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Dinner 2021


liuzhou
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6 hours ago, heidih said:

I do enjoy the pork, chive, cabbage but the smell in the office can be on the list for some with burnt microwave popcorn. Do you use head cabbage or something more akin to Napa? I agree that the group gathering to make them makes it more special like tamale making at Christmas or Banh Tet for Vietnamese Lunar New Year.

Just standard green cabbage, no chives. Some spring onion, sesame oil, soy sauce, touch of sugar, white pepper, pinch of five spice and a tiny bit of oyster sauce for the filling. We do a chive one but its generally on days where its just for the family

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Fried chicken tenders with homemade baked beans and sauteed chard (not shown, honey mustard dipping sauce)

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I always like hanger steak. Why? WiKi basically tells why:


"A hanger steak, also known as butcher's steak or hanging tenderloin, is a cut ofbeefsteak prized for its flavour. This cut is taken from the plate, which is the upper belly of the animal. In the past it was sometimes known as "butcher's steak", becausebutchers would often keep it for themselves rather than offer it for sale. This is because the general populace believed this to be a crude cut of meat, although it is actually one of the most tender."


Tender, flavorful, and fat-less. I might also add, not too expensive. What’s not to like?

 

dcarch

 

Mushroom sauce on hanger steak

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Hanger steak is delicious. It’s also a popular one at my butcher who does it in a great marinade. I have one in my freezer but am clueless as to use my big green egg. 

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I took a photo last night but our internet has been wonky so I can’t get it to properly upload. It was tacos, though, cooked outside on a little butane burner. We were at a campsite on Lake Erie with a lovely view of the lake so I had to cook outside. 
 

Tonight I found a restaurant called Dosa Place which is predominantly South Indian which is one of the SO’s most favorite things, so we had a sampling from there but by the time we got everything set up so we could eat we were far too hungry to pause for photos. They had Dosa made with wheat which our local South Indian doesn’t typically do, which was an interestingly different texture. Weirdly many of the flavors were essentially identical to our local place back home - I’m used to there being some variation just because not everyone makes things exactly the same, people tweak things. I’m wondering if there is a connection that isn’t advertised. 

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8 minutes ago, quiet1 said:

They had Dosa made with wheat which our local South Indian doesn’t typically do, which was an interestingly different texture.

 

I don't recall ever having wheat dosa, although I know they exist. What does your local place use for dosa; the traditional lentils and rice?

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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A dry, well seasoned cast iron antique hot enough to sear a two plus pound porterhouse that was SVed for four hours at 120 (I like my steak very rare).  Seared for two minutes per side.

 

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Plated with roast sweet potato and large mushroom caps roasted with butter and red wine in the caps. The caps filled with shrimp sauted in butter, garlic and mushroom stems.

 

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A nice Cabernet Sauvignon to go with.

 

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The steak was exactly how I like it.

 

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9 hours ago, dcarch said:


Tender, flavorful, and fat-less. What’s not to like?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Obviously the 'fat-less' part!  The more fat, more flavour/moisture.

 

Bring on the lard!!

 

;)

 

 

 

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Some Greek.

 

Melitzanopita - eggplant pie. Home made "rustic" (i.e. thick) phyllo. Filing of fire-roasted eggplants, feta, a little Gruyere, browned onions, some pepper, oregano, and some more spices.

The thick phyllo is crunchy-crisp (rather than papery) and substantial, with the inner layers being a bit like lasagna sheets (or sue borek). I find it works better in those kinds of pies.

 

Salad of green beans, tonato, walnuts, sirene cheese, capers.

 

Ouzo.

 

Panna cotta with honey walnuts. Some cinnamon.

 

 

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~ Shai N.

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You with the thick phyllo again! So looks like you made it - can you put recipe/method in Recipe Gullett? Must try once I can work in this kitchen again. 

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Dinner tonight was late and unusual for me. A couple of burgers.

The burgers were a mix of approximately 40% beef, 40% pork and 20% bacon. I didn't measure anything; just eyeballed it. Seasoned with sea salt and chilli flakes. Served on Chinese flat bread with tomato and shredded lettuce. More sea salt.

I'd say the burgers were the best I've ever made. Juicy and flavourful without being over-complicated.

 

Just a couple of quick cellphone snaps tonight.

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Burger No. 1. That patty was 12 cm / 4¾ inches in diameter.

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Burger No 2 - Same size

 

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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32 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Dinner tonight was late and unusual for me. A couple of burgers.

The burgers were a mix of approximately 40% beef, 40% pork and 20% bacon. I didn't measure anything; just eyeballed it. Seasoned with sea salt and chilli flakes. Served on Chinese flat bread with tomato and shredded lettuce. More sea salt.

I'd say the burgers were the best I've ever made. Juicy and flavourful without being over-complicated.

 

Just a couple of quick cellphone snaps tonight.

292316492__20210806225128.thumb.jpg.f2a8775d41e37c96d6fb971abea8a2ef.jpg

Burger No. 1. That patty was 12 cm / 4¾ inches in diameter.

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Burger No 2 - Same size

 

Love the idea of some bacon in the grind - bet it imparted a great smokey flavour and added fat for moisture!

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2 hours ago, heidih said:

You with the thick phyllo again! So looks like you made it - can you put recipe/method in Recipe Gullett? Must try once I can work in this kitchen again. 

 

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~ Shai N.

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On 8/5/2021 at 11:55 PM, liuzhou said:

 

I don't recall ever having wheat dosa, although I know they exist. What does your local place use for dosa; the traditional lentils and rice?


Yes. The wheat were called rava Dosa, I think? Thicker and lacier and a bit crunchy in bits. 
 

We got chatting with another RVer (safely distanced) and it got too late to cook, so dinner was tacos from a local chain. Not very picturesque, and there was some flavor I don’t care for, though my SO didn’t mind it. The dessert empanada was good though.

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5 minutes ago, quiet1 said:


Yes. The wheat were called rava Dosa, I think? Thicker and lacier and a bit crunchy in bits. 

 

Thanks. In my experience, they are more commonly called atta dosa (atta meaning wheat) or Godhuma dosa, but rava comes from Godhuma rava, which I thought was semolina. No doubt wiser heads will pitch in their thoughts.

 

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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Quick dinner.  Bean curds with tofu-ru (fermented tofu, spicy kind), scallions, garlic, a bit of soy, rice wine, sugar, MSG.

 

 

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~ Shai N.

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Makhlouta. A Lebanese dish with many variations - from stews to hummus like spreads. Always made with a mixture of legumes.

My take is on the variation common in Northern Israel (though not really very common), where very soft fava and chickpeas are mixed with tahini, lemon, garlic and olive oil. Served with pita much like hummus.

I opted to add some fenugreek (more common in Egyptian ful). And to keep the chickpeas on top.

Topped with an egg, home made lemony schug of sorts (green chili, garlic, lemon, coriander seeds and parsley). A generous sprinkle of cumin.

Olive oil added after the picture was taken, it's a must with fava beans (ghee also works). Pita breads, sliced vegetables and pickles.

 

 

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~ Shai N.

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Fries from our russet potatoes and shishito peppers--ONE of those peppers somewhere in there is grown by me 😁.

 

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First tomato that's not a cherry from the garden

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Big sandwiches

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Yesterday Ronnie smoked some ribs

 

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Our sweet corn this year is the best ever.  I must have sprayed the silks at exactly the right time to keep the worms out.

 

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I was hungry for macaroni salad--not Ronnie's favorite so I made baked beans for him. Okra and tomatoes too.  Perfect summer meal.

 

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Charlie has invited a lot of people over for his birthday.(which was last week) and wanted it to be all Korean BBQ food. I turned my smoker into a big grill.   I just finished grilling pork and beef and will finish putting out the rest of the stuff in a little bit. Edited to add a picture of the cake they brought. Chino is his nickname in the group.

 

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Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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