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Dinner 2021


liuzhou
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2 hours ago, weinoo said:

... this is the part of the pork chop after Significant Eater's share is sliced off

Sounds ike home    Husband gets the heart while I "suffer" with the bone and cap.    And we each think we're winners!

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eGullet member #80.

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26 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@KennethT 

 

where did you get the green peppercorns ?

Unfortunately, they're the brined ones in a jar I got at a store in Chinatown that specializes in SE Asian stuff.  But they're not nearly as good as fresh ones - but those are basically impossible to find around here.

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39 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@KennethT 

 

interesting .  so the ones I get from

 

ThaiNoodle are brined ?

 

hard for me to tell , as they are so hot.

I'd have no idea what they're getting.  Restaurants often have access to things that we consumers don't.  I had a beloved Thai place make a dish with green peppercorns and they were much more pungent than the brined ones - and also a deeper green color - so I would assume that they were not brined... but who knows where they sourced it from.  So it's certainly possible that your restaurant gets fresh ones too.  The brined ones aren't near as pungent as the fresh, and they also are a dull, light green color as opposed to a darker, more forest green color of the fresh ones.

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@KennethT 

 

ThaiNoodle's GPs look like yours

 

still mighty spicy

 

wonder how spicy fresh are

 

then I found this :

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/10/dining/fresh-green-peppercorns-are-sold-in-new-york.html

 

its probably behind a pay-wall 

 

here is the pic , for review purposes :

 

10STUFF3-superJumbo.thumb.jpg.bcfa4bdc81b03c3034383888f91f087e.jpg

 

for further review :  N.B.: the dat3e of the article :

 

""

  • Oct. 9, 2012

Peppercorns, the prized fruit of piper nigrum, a tropical vine, are used when they are still fresh and green in a number of French recipes. But until now, the only greens ones available in the United States have been canned, in brine or dried. Denis Heraud, a French filmmaker and painter, has entered the peppercorn business, importing fresh green ones that are grown on a farm in Costa Rica, with no chemicals used on the plants. “The terroir is what makes these so wonderful,” he said. “They’re the grand cru, the Lafite of pepper.” 

The peppercorns are picked in tightly clustered little branches and, if kept refrigerated in an airtight container, will maintain their color for a few days or more. Eventually they turn black, which does not affect their quality or their clean, spicy pungency. Add the fresh peppercorns to sauces (they take beautifully to butter and cream), or scatter them on fish or meat. Or, as Mr. Heraud is wont to do because he believes they are healthy, you can simply nibble a few from time to time with your tea. 

Once they blacken, the peppercorns can be dried out and, after many months, they will be suitable for a pepper mill. When ground, the dried peppercorns provide a somewhat sharper flavor and aroma than the fresher ones.

Fresh green peppercorns are sold at All Good Things, 102 Franklin Street (Church Street) for $20 an ounce (six or seven branches) and at Dean & DeLuca, 560 Broadway (Prince Street), $3 a branch. 

 

""

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They are wonderful. Only ever had them in Sydney (Oz) along with those teeny green eggplants that pop in your mouth. Eggplants between a large pea and a chickpea. It was a light curry and visually stunning as well as a delicious sensual taste adventure.

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1 hour ago, rotuts said:

@KennethT 

 

ThaiNoodle's GPs look like yours

 

still mighty spicy

 

wonder how spicy fresh are

 

then I found this :

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/10/dining/fresh-green-peppercorns-are-sold-in-new-york.html

 

its probably behind a pay-wall 

 

here is the pic , for review purposes :

 

10STUFF3-superJumbo.thumb.jpg.bcfa4bdc81b03c3034383888f91f087e.jpg

 

for further review :  N.B.: the dat3e of the article :

 

""

  • Oct. 9, 2012

Peppercorns, the prized fruit of piper nigrum, a tropical vine, are used when they are still fresh and green in a number of French recipes. But until now, the only greens ones available in the United States have been canned, in brine or dried. Denis Heraud, a French filmmaker and painter, has entered the peppercorn business, importing fresh green ones that are grown on a farm in Costa Rica, with no chemicals used on the plants. “The terroir is what makes these so wonderful,” he said. “They’re the grand cru, the Lafite of pepper.” 

The peppercorns are picked in tightly clustered little branches and, if kept refrigerated in an airtight container, will maintain their color for a few days or more. Eventually they turn black, which does not affect their quality or their clean, spicy pungency. Add the fresh peppercorns to sauces (they take beautifully to butter and cream), or scatter them on fish or meat. Or, as Mr. Heraud is wont to do because he believes they are healthy, you can simply nibble a few from time to time with your tea. 

Once they blacken, the peppercorns can be dried out and, after many months, they will be suitable for a pepper mill. When ground, the dried peppercorns provide a somewhat sharper flavor and aroma than the fresher ones.

Fresh green peppercorns are sold at All Good Things, 102 Franklin Street (Church Street) for $20 an ounce (six or seven branches) and at Dean & DeLuca, 560 Broadway (Prince Street), $3 a branch. 

 

""

Thanks.  Personally, I haven't seen any of them in stores in NYC - and D & D is definitely not the store they used to be back then!  And at $3 a branch, I don't think it's worth it for me personally.

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Until last year I had a pepper plant that supplied all of my black pepper needs. The only problem with it was that the green peppercorns were so hot that I couldn't use them. I even tried brining them and they were still too hot. Then last rainy season we had so much rain that it killed my plant. I really miss it.

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Edited by Tropicalsenior (log)
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No, I haven't joined any cult. Sometimes I like eating only vegetables in season. Damn glorious vegetables.

dHMXSTT.jpg

 

One of the rare occasions in which solid egg whites and yolks are acceptable: salted duck eggs.

MshB5W7.jpg

 

Roasted king oyster mushrooms (now available year round) and blistered jalapeños.

LQI3rPn.jpg

 

10 years and 3 months ago...

Chiloé island, Chile. One of the island's specialities is elephant garlic.

U9jkYFs.jpg

 

After checking out the market I bought a small test portion of the 3 things I wanted to take home.

oQ0fouX.jpg

 

Did the same whenever I visited a market. My rucksack weighed 5kg when I entered Chile, 4 weeks later when I left it was 10kg. The garlic, smoked goat's horn peppers, merkén and some araucaria pine kernels were the 5 extra kilos. Chile is such an unassuming country and is nobody's favourite. I love it. Never had a problem, was never hassled by anyone. This was my second visit but it sure won't be my last.

B5YxFpw.jpg

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1 hour ago, Tropicalsenior said:

Until last year I had a pepper plant that supplied all of my black pepper needs. The only problem with it was that the green peppercorns were so hot that I couldn't use them. I even tried brining them and they were still too hot. Then last rainy season we had so much rain that it killed my plant. I really miss it.

20190714_094012.thumb.jpg.11d08fe3917443b59d4c03e1fd81aab6.jpg

20190723_150428.thumb.jpg.cf6e5754f11f284295d96212d5b0cdc2.jpg

I've been considering growing them indoors in my apartment - can you tell me, how often did it fruit?  Did you have a continuous supply or did it create a flush of fruits, then nothing, then another flush, etc?

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2 minutes ago, KennethT said:

I've been considering growing them indoors in my apartment - can you tell me, how often did it fruit?  Did you have a continuous supply or did it create a flush of fruits, then nothing, then another flush, etc?

I think that they would be awfully hard to grow inside. They need a lot of sun. They grow about 6 feet tall and need a trellis to grow on. I had a crop about twice a year and it takes about two years for a plant to really get going good.

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Leftover day: Half a roasted rabbit (heavy on the garlic & rosemary side), dried black trumpets & ceps and some black olives were whipped together in a simple creamy pasta sauce and served with Maccheroni …

 

F5C2A04F-CBFC-47A9-AAA7-D9F6689CC533.thumb.jpeg.4015304e293e1c63e2a60d469c885a9f.jpeg

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17 minutes ago, btbyrd said:

Cascatelli with pistachio pesto.

 

961B2D6C-CA2D-455D-B3B6-104555727F18.thumb.jpeg.1856b083f5df3d94782e8272cf497775.jpeg


First time cooking this shape, but it lives up to the hype. Holds sauce like nobody’s business. Toothy. Forkable. Will be cooking more soon.

 

7B5DBA67-3DE5-4A10-9AEC-B381EECCE448.thumb.jpeg.18f2e414cfe046629a88d8b840a8880f.jpeg

Cool shape The color is stunning but I wonder about pistachio flavor To me it is kinda mild. Do you toast them? Just curious. ETA: basil as the herb or?

Edited by heidih (log)
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The nut flavors always work in the background, at least in the proportions I normally use. The pine nuts at the market were $20/lb and low quality, so I did what I usually do and sub pistachios o(or pumpkin seeds). These pistachios were lightly toasted and had good flavor, but the herbs, parm, and garlic are all more assertive. I used mostly basil, but also included chives, parsley, and arugula. Herbs got blanched and chilled in ice water, which makes the color pop. Added a dash of ascorbic acid to help keep it bright.

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Last night's dinner was chicken tacos.  Some of the tortillas even puffed a mite.  Prepandemic masa harina sniffed a little rancid, however that didn't seem to affect the resulting tacos.  Served with fresh salsa, avocado, wine.  Not to mention a lovely pot of Rancho Gordo Rio Zapa, one of my favorite bean varieties.

 

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