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Dinner 2021


liuzhou
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54 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Am having trouble mentally shaping

To me they look a little bit like Orecchiette. Here is a pretty decent video from YouTube. I made them once and that was enough for me. If they are truly a type of macarrones they probably used some type of extruder. This also can be made at home but it's not easy. The consistency if the pasta dough has to be so precise.

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7 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:

To me they look a little bit like Orecchiette. Here is a pretty decent video from YouTube. I made them once and that was enough for me. If they are truly a type of macarrones they probably used some type of extruder. This also can be made at home but it's not easy. The consistency if the pasta dough has to be so precise.

Thanks,Ts.   Yes, I've made Orecchiette and, like you, found them a pia, which fired my questioning if further creating a shell was practicable.   But as you say, proper dough and patience/practice are the determinants.  

eGullet member #80.

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10 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

creating a shell was practicable.

In one of our favorite restaurants in Seattle, the grandmother came in three days a week just to make their pasta. Many fine Italian restaurants have one person just to make the pasta and the speed with which they can turn them out is incredible. At my age, the speed with which I can get a package down from the grocery store shelf is good enough for me. However, if I could figure out how to make orzo it might be different.

Edited by Tropicalsenior (log)
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1 hour ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Wow!   Never heard or even imagined such a thing.   Do you think they were hand or machine made?   Am having trouble mentally shaping them.  Thanks for these.

I can certainly find out - these tasted fresh, and considering the restaurant, my guess is made in house, but could be purchased.

 

And you too can make orecchiette...

 

Edited by weinoo (log)
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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Just now, Margaret Pilgrim said:

In my dotage I have discovered/decided that Strozzapreti are my speed.    Mindless, idiot-proof, angst-free, impressive if only to me.

 

Just don't let the Catholic guilt get to you.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

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Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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On 6/18/2021 at 9:37 AM, David Ross said:

My current favorite pasta, bucatini, this time with mushrooms, spinach and lots of asiago cheese. 

 Fried Garlic Bucatini (2).JPG

And topped with my favorite form of garlic, Vietnamese Fried Garlic from the Asian store

 

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17 minutes ago, David Ross said:

And topped with my favorite form of garlic, Vietnamese Fried Garlic from the Asian store

 

That and the fried shallots are such a great pantry items. Cheap too.

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14 minutes ago, heidih said:

That and the fried shallots are such a great pantry items. Cheap too.

Yes I forgot about that big container of fried shallots I have.  The prices are almost too low.  Another one of my favorites are the pickled green peppercorns.  Perfect for a Steak au Poivre with Green Peppercorn Sauce. A tiny jar of those in a grocery store is big bucks.

 

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One of my favorites I'll be making this week is Satay with Red Curry Dipping Sauce.  I love hot dogs and hamburgers on the backyard grill, and not a brisket cook, and I like seafood grilled, but I also tire of the same dishes all summer long.  People love Satay and love putting their own skewers together.  I do pork, beef and chicken and serve it with the sauce and a quick cucumber pickle with Thai bird chiles, rice vinegar, sugar, salt and cilantro. 

Classic Thai Satay.JPG

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4 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Wow!   Never heard or even imagined such a thing.   Do you think they were hand or machine made?   Am having trouble mentally shaping them.  Thanks for these.


I was certainly wrong about them making this pasta in-house…

 

Hi Mitch, 
 
Thank you for posting your meal at Ernesto’s! Our pasta is handmade by a boutique family company in Barcelona that we get shipped and the fish is Arctic char. 
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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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2 minutes ago, weinoo said:


I was certainly wrong about them making this pasta in-house…

 

Hi Mitch, 
 
Thank you for posting your meal at Ernesto’s! Our pasta is handmade by a boutique family company in Barcelona that we get shipped and the fish is Arctic char. 

sounds fabulous!

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eGullet member #80.

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Steamed whole cauliflower

Tplmr4O.jpg

 

Spätzle with cream. Crispy-fried Speck with fresh garlic in a small bowl.

Tti3Iqw.jpg

 

Made a batch of "fauxjia" seasoning (no cumin in it!). Instead I fried fennel seeds in a dry pan then pounded to a coarse powder.

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What it looks like

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No meat in the house but I always have various tofu. "Fauxjitas" with a type of super dense tofu.

0eYqJb5.jpg

 

Greek red wine. Not bad at all.

Kibta5x.jpg

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2 hours ago, David Ross said:

One of my favorites I'll be making this week is Satay with Red Curry Dipping Sauce.  I love hot dogs and hamburgers on the backyard grill, and not a brisket cook, and I like seafood grilled, but I also tire of the same dishes all summer long.  People love Satay and love putting their own skewers together.  I do pork, beef and chicken and serve it with the sauce and a quick cucumber pickle with Thai bird chiles, rice vinegar, sugar, salt and cilantro. 

Classic Thai Satay.JPG

One of my favorite types of satay are what you would find in Singapore...  Most of the satay hawkers are muslim, so there is usually no pork but instead mutton, duck, chicken and beef are common.  The marinade is a bit spicy, and the dipping suace is usually some type of curry with a bit of shrimp paste and coconut milk but it's no nearly as thick as yours - I could drink it like a soup!

 

IMG_0329.thumb.jpg.575c51b7e26fc0d3cf2c85fc7065298f.jpg

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2 hours ago, KennethT said:

One of my favorite types of satay are what you would find in Singapore...  Most of the satay hawkers are muslim, so there is usually no pork but instead mutton, duck, chicken and beef are common.  The marinade is a bit spicy, and the dipping suace is usually some type of curry with a bit of shrimp paste and coconut milk but it's no nearly as thick as yours - I could drink it like a soup!

 

IMG_0329.thumb.jpg.575c51b7e26fc0d3cf2c85fc7065298f.jpg

Oh what I would give for a Mutton Satay!

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17 minutes ago, David Ross said:

Oh what I would give for a Mutton Satay!

me too!!!!

 

3 minutes ago, weinoo said:

In other words, it's nutton without mutton?

Chicken's got nuttin' on that mutton!

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17 minutes ago, David Ross said:

Oh what I would give for a Mutton Satay!

Also note how they cut the meat for the satay - this is very common - rather than long flat strips like we commonly see in the US, it's small chunks - maybe 3/4" in diameter by 1" long threaded on the skewer.  Makes for a juicier bite and easier to eat with chopsticks - you can use the chopsticks to slide each piece off the skewer onto the plate.

 

Or you can do it like this place did in Indonesia... this is goat (kambing) satay - it arrived already taken off of the skewer.  They use like a thick, sweet soy sauce with chilli for dipping rather than a curry:

20190705_192245.thumb.jpg.d0f3c4d92b3026f59050bb699e6cce6d.jpg

 

20190705_192336.thumb.jpg.5c72bad30b7785f3ee1c0a90a3e43dc0.jpg

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