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Food History Articles and Links


liuzhou
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A rose by any other name...

 

"Kimchi's new Chinese name has become the epicenter of a cultural war ... again"

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More than just a spicy staple served in Korean households and restaurants around the world, kimchi -- the iconic fermented vegetable dish -- has once again become the subject of a cultural feud between China and South Korea.
The latest salvo in the long-running culinary battle was fired in July, when South Korea's Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism released a notice that it's amending the official guidelines on "the appropriate foreign language" for a few Korean foods.
Among them is a stipulation that xinqi is to be the new, official Chinese name for kimchi. The old common translation, pao cai (salted fermented vegetables), would be retired.

 

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Posted (edited)

Six years ago, I opened a topic about Cameron, my newly (then) acquired pig face.

 

ph3.jpg.22da79fd7c35fd28d8b1750771445f67

 

Today I come across this article from La Crosse, Wisconsin: The La Crosse Tribune. Wednesday, 28 November 1951. Page 9, col. 3.

 

803555033_pigsface.png.b37aa68bfed1cd8bb2c55ab1766e6342.png

 

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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23 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Six years ago, I opened a topic about Cameron, my newly (then) acqured pig face.

 

ph3.jpg.22da79fd7c35fd28d8b1750771445f67

 

Today I come across this article from La Crosse, Wisconsin: The La Crosse Tribune. Wednesday, 28 November 1951. Page 9, col. 3.

 

803555033_pigsface.png.b37aa68bfed1cd8bb2c55ab1766e6342.png

 

 

In Texas this year some swine killed and ate a woman.  I bought two loin chops yesterday.

 

 

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When I ask someone where they are from, and the response is "Mexico", I say that is a big country with lots of regions. They perk up and are happy to wax poetic about their regional specialties.  

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52 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:

 

Does 'authentic' Mexican food exist?

 

https://www.bbc.com/travel/article/20210131-does-authentic-mexican-food-exist

This is a great article on the evolution of Mexican food and why so many people that love Tex-Mex food are shocked when they finally go to Mexico and eat Mexican food.

 

Not so different from all the Americans and Europeans who love Chinese food and come to China and can't find what they call Chinese food!

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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If anyone wants to take me out for my birthday, this is what I want.

Of course there are a few other things in this article that you could choose if you really want to pamper me.

BBC News - Why people pay thousands for opulent 'experience' foods https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20210823-why-people-pay-thousands-for-opulent-experience-foods

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

LOL There was a much less dire example of similar advertising in my local Yellow Pages a few years ago.

 

For those who don't know Saint John, NB (which I can safely assume to be all of you) there is a paper mill perched alongside the river just north and west of the downtown core (which here is called "uptown"), which lends that distinctive pulp-mill fragrance to a large swath of the surrounding area.

 

A popular gastropub in the uptown area is the Saint John Alehouse, owned and operated by our local celebrity chef Jesse Vergen (Canadian eG'ers may remember him for his deep runs on two seasons of Top Chef Canada, or his judging stint on Wall of Chefs). A decade or so ago, the Alehouse's Yellow Pages ad featured the slogan

 

"Uptown, Upscale, and Mostly Upwind"

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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5 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Christmas recipes from Britain during WWII rationing. More here.

 

1be071e94a4025fe7f7c0d68de2a28af.thumb.jpg.65d5f3ffd0240941b484f73fed6faf41.jpg


Thanks for the reference to WWII - could have as well been the Brexit edition for the upcoming holiday season 🤭

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7 hours ago, liuzhou said:

during WWII rationing.

It makes you really admire the resilience of our ancestors and their determination to carry on as normal as possible during hard times. I really wonder where they came up with their science behind the mincemeat recipe. If you make a small batch, you must use it within 10 days but if you double the recipe it will last 12 months. Huh?

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  • 2 weeks later...

By the 1920s, commercially distributed frozen food had been around for about 60 years, initially in Australia. Perhaps more so in the UK than the USA. Meat was exported from Australia to the UK in 1868.  Frozen chickens were imported by the UK from Russia starting in 1885.

 

It wasn't until Birdeye developed flash freezing in 1929, that it really took off en masse.

 

Of course, frozen food had been around since neolithic times.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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