Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Vessels that promote the most condensation


Recommended Posts

Which vessels allow the most condensation? Tagine vs Doufeu vs Staub? Which of the above allow significant condensation while simmering at the lowest  temperature? I am big believer of low temp cooking and was curious to get your input on which of the above will simmer at the lowest temperature while enabling the most condensation (or least steam leak). 

 

Assumptions

- All lids fit tightly

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Samer said:

 

 

Which vessels allow the most condensation? Tagine vs Doufeu vs Staub? Which of the above allow significant condensation while simmering at the lowest  temperature? I am big believer of low temp cooking and was curious to get your input on which of the above will simmer at the lowest temperature while enabling the most condensation (or least steam leak). 

 

Assumptions

- All lids fit tightly

 

An Anova Precision Oven.  A tagine lid should not fit tightly.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Staubs.  I reach for the 3 L Staub now as my first go-to, for soups, beans, braises, curries, etc.

 

As a matter of fact, when I take the lid off, I'm careful to hold it upside down so the moisture doesn't drip back into the pot.

 

1297433017_Lambcurry11-01.thumb.jpeg.8861025b2ae7a90a9f54629528986078.jpeg

 

Like this lamb curry.

 

 

  • Like 1

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to post
Share on other sites

@Samer 

 

interesting question

 

its true the Staub's have 

 

cast iron or enabled cast iron stalactites in the lid

 

40501413_1.thumb.jpg.f135686d9628161a5d09be6a60da46b0.jpg

 

I think this is meant to get more even condensation back into what you are cookiing

 

rather than a single big puddle.

 

not sure this matters that much , but the pots are a joy to use and expensive.

 

frequently , parchment paper is placed between a lid and a pot for slow braise

 

to give a tighter fit .   or a parchment paper disk is placed right on top of 

 

what's in your pot 

 

shy do you want condensation , per se ?

 

to eliminate evaporation ?  Id guess

 

not to be cheeky ,   consider traditional braise   a la oven

 

vs SV braise a la sealed vac'd bag at the temperature of your choice 

 

for comparison 

Edited by rotuts (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

It is more of a scientific question. I feel like the condensation would ensure a lower temperature of cooking even if lid is well sealed (condensate is colder than both underneath). )Like this you could

cook with no to mimimal water added and at lower temperature = moist meat. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

@weinoo 

 

excellent !

 

Im guessing you've had that pot 

 

for quite some time.

 

and its given you great personal satisfaction

 

every time you used it,

 

My Dellerins 3 mm copper pots ,

 

three of various sizes 

 

" for the oven "

 

also have done me great service

 

over 30 ++years

 

the largest , $ 15 USD at the time in France , 11 FF to the buck

 

w free AirFrance shipping  .....

 

fine cooking equipment 

 

carefully purchased 

 

are a great joy to use 

 

carefull cooking , w very fine ingredients 

 

locally obtained 

 

in an IKEA  vessel 

 

will taste the same

 

theis is a N.B.: for Younger Home Cooks'

 

after all

 

if you read this book :

 

https://www.amazon.com/Snowball-Warren-Buffett-Business-Life/dp/0553384619/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=the+snowball&qid=1608397970&sr=8-1

 

and no , its not a ' quick tip '

 

its a very well written book

 

about a very unusual person

 

who understood

 

" The Snowball "

 

just starting out ?

 

IKEA  , and then understand

 

" The SnowBall "

 

and the SB is not what's ion my front yard now

 

cheers 

 

Merry Seasonings to You All !

 

R and MC

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, rotuts said:

My Dellerins 3 mm copper pots

My DeHellerins are near and dear to my heart as well.

 

I think that specific Staub Dutch oven goes on sale a few times every year.

 

As a matter of fact...SAKS (must be 3.5 L, as it's 4 quarts)

Edited by weinoo (log)

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to post
Share on other sites

@weinoo

 

excellent

 

but

 

if you are starting out

 

use IKEA as your co-pilot

 

and invest the difference

 

you will still need 

 

" A Very Sharp Knife "

 

      Jacques Pepin 

 

and 4 all all you need 

 

initially

 

for your first 20 - 30 years

 

of cooking for your slelf

 

and your ( eventual )

 

Famiy.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Samer said:

 

 

Which vessels allow the most condensation? Tagine vs Doufeu vs Staub? Which of the above allow significant condensation while simmering at the lowest  temperature? I am big believer of low temp cooking and was curious to get your input on which of the above will simmer at the lowest temperature while enabling the most condensation (or least steam leak). 

 

Assumptions

- All lids fit tightly

 

I don't think Le Creuset makes the Doufeu anymore but it was designed to promote condensation. It had spikes like Staub as well as a recessed lid that gets filled with ice (see pic). In theory the temp differential causes water to rise within the pot and then fall back onto the food. I've never owned one so I can't comment on how well it works.

image.jpeg.59e33cab6e3f87d8df89466076550dd5.jpeg

Edited by chord (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Back then 

 

way back then

 

Western Cooking

 

FR , other meditteranian countries

 

cooked a certain way

 

now is not then

 

so there are different ways

 

to cook

 

1) in an older , very proven way

 

or

 

2) a newer , very proven way

 

for the same result

 

on your plate

 

no Modernist odd powders to buy at all

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, dcarch said:

I am not sure if this makes sense.

 

Condensation is pure water. So if water gets evaporated and not condensed back into the pot, why not just add more water?

 

dcarch

 

Well regularly checking the water level is kind of a pain. Plus you'd probably want to heat any water before adding it back to the pot as too much cold water may slow the cooking process.

 

Also some tout the "rain" of condensation like in this Staub video. That benefit though may be a little harder to swallow.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I got my two IKEA enamelled cast iron ones about 15 years ago, and they are in heavy use. I can wholeheartedly endorse them. Given their basic composition I would not foresee any wear and tear taking them out of service in the next decades, except if I really try to physically damage them. That would be no different to a Staub or Le Creuset.

 

The loss of vapour is minimal. In the beginning I used the technique of sealing the rim/lid additionally with some dough (when a stew gets finished in the oven) once or twice, but found it is hardly worth the effort. The lid is heavy and well fitting and prevents moisture loss well.

 

And just for completion sake: they do have these little condensation seeders in the lid as well ...

 

B2CC725A-EFB9-40B4-A3FC-406379A6069B.thumb.jpeg.53cc568a8d28a7c7540facec8dc9da9b.jpeg

Edited by Duvel (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, weinoo said:

Why not start with a Staub, never to be replaced, and save IKEA for candles, Swedish meatballs, and Daims?


 

Agree 100%.   As mentioned by Weinoo, the Staub goes on sale for 100 bucks each Christmas season.    It’s criminal to pass on it at that price.

 

To answer the original question.   I think a Dutch oven will work as well as anything and is the most versatile option if you are considering a purchase.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This may seem off track but with any cooking vessel with a tight lid, I have found that once the boiling starts thus steam rising, twisting the lid creates a tighter seal. Could be just anecdotal or have a physics aspect. There was a trend for a while to do vegetables that way - minimal water, very tight lid. And like @weinoo pop the lid turned immediately upside down to eliminate drip back. Steamers were trending too, but this allowed some butter or addition of choice. I think Elizabeth Schneider popularised the method when writing for the LA Times. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, rotuts said:

its true the Staub's have 

 

2 hours ago, Duvel said:

That would be no different to a Staub or Le Creuset.

 

Except the Staub says Made in France. And is cooler than the IEKA ones.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, heidih said:

twisting the lid creates a tighter seal. Could be just anecdotal or have a physics aspect.

 

Well the physics says, a 12 inch lid has 144 square inch of surface area.  Boiling water can easily give you more than a lb/sq in of pressure ( a pressure cooker cooks at 15 ibs /sq. in.) So if the boiling water gives you 1 lb/sq in of vapor pressure, your 12 inch lid will need to be at least 144 lbs heavy to keep the steam inside.

 

dcarch

Edited by dcarch (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, dcarch said:

 

Well the physics says, a 12 inch lid has 144 square inch of surface area.  Boiling water can easily give you more than a lb/sq in of pressure ( a pressure cooker cooks at 15 ibs /sq. in.) So if the boiling water gives you 1 lb/sq in of vapor pressure, your 12 inch lid will need to be at least 144 lbs heavy to keep the steam inside.

 

dcarch

 

Oh well I believe in Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny though I am usually the understudy. Mind = powerfully creative organ ;)

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, weinoo said:

Except the Staub says Made in France. And is cooler than the IEKA ones.


That might be a USP in the US ... YMMV.

 

Just to add:

 

 

D06AD8A7-77C9-4201-8074-DCBEDA8D5C69.jpeg

47BE2714-327B-457A-921F-F079AE626070.jpeg

Edited by Duvel (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

A riddle:

 

Someone comes to me and says: I have two enameled cast-iron Dutch ovens. They are both brand new. They are both the same size, the same color, and you can have one of them for free. One is a Staub. One is an IKEA. Which one do you want?

 

 

THE STAUB!

  • Like 2

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...