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Gingerbread man pan


highchef
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I own this pan, which I bought 30 years ago in a general store in Fredericksburg Tx. It’s heavy cast aluminum. I love him, but I have issues every time I try to make a gingerbread in it. If the recipe isn’t dense enough, it falls apart at the arms and legs. If it rises and not pressed down, the head cracks at the neck. I have a tasty recipe, but can’t get it to work, and I’m thinking because it uses hot water it makes the cake too light. The grands like the lighter cake as opposed to the denser one, but I’m thinking there must be a trick to make this guy come out intact. Never once has it popped out intact. I can fix the head with a tie, but there must be a way, or another recipe that would be tasty and keep him intact. Any ideas? It will hold a bit less than a standard 9x13 pan, without going over. I spray the heck out of this pan, but I think it’s the recipe that needs to be changed out...
 

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My gingerbread recipe also uses hot water and with all the molasses in it - it's pretty sticky. I don't think I've ever turned it out before cutting it - it gets cut in the pan. I have a pan spray that I really like and it seems to work where others fail - but I'm not sure how easy it is to get your hands on. I got my first and second can as samples at the PMCA and then figured out how to buy a couple of cases of it for @Alleguede's bakery guaranteeing my supply for life!

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I wonder if the Clear Oil is the same stuff Wilton sells. I’ll check it out, thanks! 
and btw, I have tried to find this pan for a friend who fell in love with him, but no luck! Even tracked down the general store in Fredericksburg but they had no idea...30 years , things change.

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1 hour ago, highchef said:

If I find another, I’ll let you know. After my last search, I figured I must be the only person who has one!

oh, Kerry! I think I know the problem! It’s a jello mold!?

 

To be honest he creeps me out as a gingerbread man. But he would be creepier still as a jello man.

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What does the inside of the pan look like and have you ever used crisco (applied with a brush) and floured the pan before baking?

 

Edited to add:  Have you ever baked a non-gingerbread recipe in the pan, just to see what happens?

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