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Your favorite mushroom dishes


helenas
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I'm always excited when Jinmyo posts her next mushroom dish on the Dinner thread. Now there are also Ed's wonderful shiitakes.

My other favorite recipe is from "One Potato, Two Potato" book, which is slow-roasted shiitakes(about an hour in F300 oven). Lately i started to prepare it using half oyster mushrooms/half shiitakes, and i think it's an improvement as oysters added a needed texture.

What's your favorite fresh mushroom dish? Especially employing the usual suspects: buttons, creminis, shiitakes and oysters.

thank you

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I made a wonderful wild mushroom stuffing for Thanksgiving and Xmas this year and last!

It's quite a hit:

http://www.foodporn.com/amateur/dec2001/pa...es/DSCN0004.htm

And i don't really have a recipe for this one but pizza is a great treatment of the mushrooms if you have a huge haul!

http://www.foodporn.com/hardcore/november2...es/DSCN0054.htm

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I was intoduced to mushrooms quite late in life as my mother hates them.

I do remember loving these marinated mushrooms that were always part of my grandmother's antipasto platter.

Now I sautee mushrooms and put them everywhere, risotto, pasta, pizza. etc My frienda nd I once made a pizza with sauteed wild mushrooms, goat cheese and topped with arugula when it was pulled out of the oven, best pizza I ever had!

I am going to give roasting a try, but soemtimes I just love the bite of a raw white mushroom. I often make a mushroom salad with a lemon and EVOO dressing and shavings of parmasean.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Classic sauteed mushrooms on toast

1) Use as many different varieties as possible. Variety is the spice of rice

2) Cook in hot oil in small batches. Get them golden on the caps if poss

3) Add a splash of double cream at the end, then minced garlic and parsley AT THE LAST MINUTE

4) Don't cook more than half a minute after adding garlic and parsley. Serve on toasted bread.

J

More Cookbooks than Sense - my new Cookbook blog!
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I don't have a favourite dish but I do have a favourite method: roasting.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Queso Fundido con Chorizo y Hongos...

Queso Oaxaca (a Mexican mozarella-type cheese), sliced

Chorizo

Mushrooms - brushed & thickly sliced

Fresh flour tortillas

Pico de Gallo

Guacamole

In skillet, brown loose chorizo, crumbling to break apart any large pieces. When fairly brown, add mushrooms, trying to keep mushrooms on one half of pan and chorizo on other. Saute until mushrooms are cooked in the chorizo juices.

Into shallow flameproof ramekin (I have the small, two-handled Calphalon paella dish that I use for this) put chorizo, pushing it to one side. Then, put mushrooms in a pile on the other side of the dish leaving a kind of empty spot in the middle.

Layer the cheese on, primarily in the middle of the dish. Run dish under broiler until cheese is hot and bubbly.

Serve immediately: set sizzling oven pan on trivet on table. Have tortillas slightly grilled and hot and ready to go; ditto a bowl of pico and a bowl of guacamole.

Provide a serving fork. The deal is that you hold a warm tortilla in your hand and with the fork, dig into the melted cheese and chorizo and mushrooms and scoop some of it up and onto your tortilla, which you then fold over and eat like a soft taco (which, of course, it is). Add as much pico and/or guacamole as you like.

Wash down with a cold beer.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Polenta with wild mushrooms based on the recipe in Debra Ponzek's excellent book, French Food American Accent. The reason I like this version of

polenta is that it is very soft and creamy, using finely ground corn meal means

that you don't have to cook this very long. The wild mushrooms sauteed first,

then simmered in stock reach a depth of flavor, that is enhanced by the use

of truffle oil in the polenta, or if you are richer than I am, you can shave truffles

over the top, the recipe is on page 120

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I've just roasted whole cremini, lashed with EVOO, rosemary, kosher salt and fresh pepper at 400f for twenty minutes. I then deglazed the pan with a Belgian beer that has notes of cardomum and orange, threw this and the mushrooms into some sauteed Swiss chard, added some cream.

This with slices of a very rare rib steak and grilled crostini rubbed with garlic.

I'm eating this at my desk.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I grew up thinking morels WERE mushrooms, never saw another kind except canned until I left home. The only way we ate them was this: my mother soaked them in salt water to get rid of the pesky varmits that always hid in the cracks. She then patted them dry, dipped in beaten egg and cracker crumbs (not too fine) and sauteed in butter until golden brown.

We ate with bread and more butter, and reveled in the richness.

My most popular mushroom dish is Mushroom Stuffed Squash: a stuffing of finely chopped button mushrooms, butter, onion, garlic, breadcrumbs and Parmesan or Romano spread over tiny summer squash halves and baked.

Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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My most popular mushroom dish is Mushroom Stuffed Squash:  a stuffing of finely chopped button mushrooms, butter, onion, garlic, breadcrumbs and Parmesan or Romano spread over tiny summer squash halves and baked.

I think this sounds absolutely wonderful.

Do you have an actual recipe for it, or is it just something you "do"? If you know what I mean.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I grew up in the forties and fifties in northern rural Illinois, in "the little bump on the big bump" eight miles from the Mississippi.

Here's the mushroom squash recipe. The reason it appears in this form is because I've copied it from my cookbook manuscript. I just got the proofs back this week, and am starting to get excited. Enjoy.

Mushroom Squash

***Unique/Original

This recipe is one of a trio of very similar recipes which I use constantly: the mushroom stuffing for Rock Cornish hens, the mushroom mixture spread over the top in this squash favorite, and a filling for mushroom appetizers in cream cheese pastry or filo pastry. The poultry version is seasoned with thyme and has lots of chopped onion; the pastry filling is bound by egg and substitutes green onion; this one is given an Italian flavor with the additions of garlic and cheese. I created one of them, although I can't remember which, and the other two are variations; mushroom lovers adore all.

I served this at a buffet supper once, and it was the most popular dish of all!

9 small or 12-16 tiny small yellow crookneck squash

1/2 cup butter

1 onion, grated

12 ounces mushrooms, washed and finely chopped

1 large clove garlic, minced or pressed

1 1/2 cups fresh bread crumbs

Salt and freshly ground pepper

Grated Romano or Parmesan cheese, about 1/2 cup

Scrub squash and cut in half lengthwise. Place, cut side up, on a buttered baking dish just large enough to hold squash in a single layer when crowded tightly. Lightly salt and pepper.

Melt butter in a large skillet or saucepan over medium heat and cook onion a few minutes. Add mushrooms and garlic, and cook rapidly until almost all liquid has evaporated. Remove from heat, stir in breadcrumbs and season to taste with salt and pepper. Spread mixture evenly over squash and sprinkle top with cheese.

Bake 30-45 minutes at 350 degrees, or until squash is tender when pierced with a fork.

Oven temperature: 350 degrees

Yield: 8 servings (or fewer; quantities are from a multi-course menu with other vegetables)

Yes, I wash mushrooms. That extra flavor you save by wiping is often dirt.

Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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Thank you very, very much for the recipe, and congratulations on the book!!

Here's how I do my mushrooms. I have a big wad of paper towels handy by the sink, and then turn the water on. I quickly wash each mushroom, getting off as much dirt as I can under the running water. Then I immediately dry each one off after I wash them.

They don't really have time to absorb much water that way. Of course, I never let them sit in water, either. I had mushrooms at a friend's house last night on her crudite platter. She had clearly let the mushrooms sit in water because they tasted just like you were trying to chew your way through little round gray sponges.

Actually, I had quite a row with myself over this. I mean, should I tell her or not. Hurt feelings vs soggy mushrooms...hurt feelings vs soggy mushrooms...hurt feelings vs soggy mushrooms. I decided to tell her, although not then, not at the time, not in the middle of the party. I'm going to tell her later, when it's just the two of us.

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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a mushroom bread pudding, with Gruyere.

Thanks for an inspiration, dude.

tomorrow night I'm thinking of a savory mushroom flan, as an app or possibly a main.

--------

g. johnson's pasta with mushrooms (which I'd like to replicate one of these days)

ditto with Ed's shiitakes.

as a filling for ravioli

as a filling for omelettes

as a topping for bruschetta

to name a few...

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