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Culinary Terms that Should be Banned!


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The entree thing! You don't have to speak French to see the word "enter" in there.

 

Previously discussed here but I continue to see and hear it -  "crack" to describe food. Pray you never see the inside of a crack house.

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2 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Fresser, I believe.

 

Pedantic, I know.

 

Yes but that is more Nero Wolfe eater; more gourmand - at least in my linguistic world. . Like you say it about an animal but us humans are so much more refined...right...

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Good job LZ, love the passion and anger.  Went to a friend's once (in Brooklyn no less) for a 'grill-out' which translated to defrosted hot dogs and hamburgers scorched on a gas bbq.  I thanked him for these yummy, carefully curated entrees with a promise to return the favor in a timely manner.  I offered, in contrast, an indoor meal or so he could understand, a 'grill-in'.    

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That wasn't chicken

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3 hours ago, weinoo said:

And here I thought they were harvesting ice from a mountain top!

No but from fresh water ponds and storing it.  On little old Shelter Island we  had 3 ice houses in the late 1800s.

 

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

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This is more a regional attribute, but I abhor throwing the word "barbecue" around indiscriminately. "A barbecue" is a sandwich made with pulled smoked pork, preferably with a topping of slaw; it is NOT:

(a) an event at which you cook hamburgers and hot dogs on a grill while attired in shorts, black socks and sandals.

(b) a sandwich made with smoked chicken, or lamb, or any other sort of meat other than pork or beef, and I will only reluctantly grant beef.

(c) in its verb form, the act of cooking anything on a grill unless said grill is set up as a smoker.

 

Ribs slow smoked over a low fire are barbecued ribs (either pork or beef); brisket smoked over a low fire is barbecued brisket; fish smoked over a low fire is smoked...well, you get my drift.

 

In the purest Mid-South form, barbecue (noun) is smoked pulled pork. Period. In all other uses, barbecue(d) is an adjective or a verb.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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I've never heard "a barbecue" used to refer to a barbecue sandwich, but agree on all other points. I could sure go for one, whatever they call it. I'm afraid the ship has sailed on "entree" as the English word for "main course" although it is nonsensical. My personal peeve is calling any cocktail served in a martini glass "a martini" - there must be gin and vermouth in it to be a martini, that concoction made out of neon-colored liqueur and vodka is not a martini no matter what glass you put it in. I'm afraid that ship has sailed as well, though.

 

(I also hate martini glasses, because I'm too much of a klutz to drink out of a full one without spilling, but that's a topic for another day.)

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"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

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5 minutes ago, munchymom said:

My personal peeve is calling any cocktail served in a martini glass "a martini" - there must be gin and vermouth in it to be a martini,

I go right along with this, and I'm sure it has been ranted about in the past.

 

Nick & Nora glasses are nice for martinis.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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I grew up in Los Angeles. To us BBQ was outside, on a grill, preferably over charcoal. Now I guess it is called "grilling". Not a word we knew and we did not know Southern American Q. So regional?  This is my old Weber - granted fire off to sde as it was a slow Q  of pork neck not a quickie. . I m so goofy as a kid I thought the "bar" was cuz of the bar like marks from the grill! I have read abut the barbacoa derivation. 

post-52659-0-72529800-1304728169.jpg

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10 minutes ago, weinoo said:

I go right along with this, and I'm sure it has been ranted about in the past.

 

Nick & Nora glasses are nice for martinis.

My GF and I are planning a Thin Man marathon at some point over the holidays. :)

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Apps or "appys". >:(

"Apps" is short for "applications" and you will find those on your smart phone.

Appetizers are what you eat/serve before dinner.

 

and another:

"Sammies" instead of sandwiches. Are we children who can't say big words anymore? Please. Just, no.

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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10 minutes ago, Toliver said:

Apps or "appys". >:(

"Apps" is short for "applications" and you will find those on your smart phone.

Appetizers are what you eat/serve before dinner.

 

and another:

"Sammies" instead of sandwiches. Are we children who can't say big words anymore? Please. Just, no.

But the latter is cultural I think. I do not say it - not my culture. If someone from Oz or NZ does - that is their term.  And this https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhyming_slang

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2 hours ago, kayb said:

This is more a regional attribute, but I abhor throwing the word "barbecue" around indiscriminately. "A barbecue" is a sandwich made with pulled smoked pork, preferably with a topping of slaw; it is NOT:

(a) an event at which you cook hamburgers and hot dogs on a grill while attired in shorts, black socks and sandals.

(b) a sandwich made with smoked chicken, or lamb, or any other sort of meat other than pork or beef, and I will only reluctantly grant beef.

(c) in its verb form, the act of cooking anything on a grill unless said grill is set up as a smoker.

Agree c. partially b. but not a.   If not a bbq what do you call it?  A picnic? A grilling event? Nah

That wasn't chicken

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52 minutes ago, Toliver said:

 

 

and another:

"Sammies" instead of sandwiches. Are we children who can't say big words anymore? Please. Just, no.

 

Popularized by another one of my (least) favorites on her cooking/tv shows...Rachael Ray. Feh.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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14 hours ago, liuzhou said:

7. Bánh Mi


I'm sorry, but bunging random ingredients into a baguette does not make a bánh mi in my book. I frequently have bacon, lettuce and tomato (BLT) sandwiches for breakfeast using baguettes, but would never call them bánh mi as some idiot did on a YouTube video I unfortunately stumbled upon recently.

 

I am all for variation, but at least stick with something that may be vaguely recognisable to a passing Vietnamese person.

 

Preach!

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PastaMeshugana

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"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

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16 minutes ago, heidih said:

No I think Pandemic has us just a touch bored


That's ok, I wasn't excluding myself from that "we." I have a few I could toss in the mix. :D

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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7 hours ago, kayb said:

This is more a regional attribute, but I abhor throwing the word "barbecue" around indiscriminately. "A barbecue" is a sandwich made with pulled smoked pork, preferably with a topping of slaw; it is NOT:

(a) an event at which you cook hamburgers and hot dogs on a grill while attired in shorts, black socks and sandals.

(b) a sandwich made with smoked chicken, or lamb, or any other sort of meat other than pork or beef, and I will only reluctantly grant beef.

(c) in its verb form, the act of cooking anything on a grill unless said grill is set up as a smoker.

 

Ribs slow smoked over a low fire are barbecued ribs (either pork or beef); brisket smoked over a low fire is barbecued brisket; fish smoked over a low fire is smoked...well, you get my drift.

 

In the purest Mid-South form, barbecue (noun) is smoked pulled pork. Period. In all other uses, barbecue(d) is an adjective or a verb.

 

Language history is not with you. The original meeaning of barbecue as a noun was

 

Quote

1 A rude wooden framework, used in America for sleeping on, and for supporting above a fire meat that is to be smoked or dried.

 

This dates from the late 17th century.

A later 18th century meaning is

 

Quote

A large social entertainment, usually in the open air, at which animals are roasted whole, and other provisions liberally supplied. Also attrib. orig. U.S.

 

 

Your preference is more modern.

Defintions from OED.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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5 hours ago, Eatmywords said:

Agree c. partially b. but not a.   If not a bbq what do you call it?  A picnic? A grilling event? Nah

 

A cookout.

 

3 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

That would be a cookout.  In the US south, we even have a hamburger/hotdog stand named that.  😁

 

See?

 

12 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

Language history is not with you. The original meeaning of barbecue as a noun was

 

 

This dates from the late 17th century.

A later 18th century meaning is

 

 

Your preference is more modern.

Defintions from OED.

 

I would be curious to know what region of the country was used as the standard for that. 

 

@munchymom, I promise, you walk into any barbecue joint down here and tell them you want a barbecue, and you'll get a sandwich. If you want the meat on a plate with beans, slaw and fries, you ask for a barbecue plate. They may then ask you if you want a sandwich plate or a pork plate.

 

I would also note that I am glad there is one other person out there who has issues with spilling martinis from a martini glass. And that would be before I've consumed the first one. Agreed on the flavored and odd-colored ones, but as someone who has an aversion to most gins (I finally found one I can drink), I am partial to vodka martinis. But I recognize that if I want one I have to specify vodka as the liquor. Is there another name for vodka shaken with a hint of vermouth and some olive juice, and garnished with an olive on a toothpick?

 

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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6 minutes ago, kayb said:

I would be curious to know what region of the country was used as the standard for that. 

 

Here are some of the early citations

 

Quote

1733 B. Lynde Diary (1880) 138 Fair and hot; Browne, barbacue; hack overset.    1809 W. Irving Knickerb. iv. ix. (1849) 240 Engaged in a great ‘barbecue,’ a kind of festivity or carouse much practised in Merryland.    1815 Salem (Mass.) Gaz. 30 June 3/2 An elegant Barbacue Dinner.    1881 H. Pierson In Brush 90 On any occasion when the barbecue feast was to be the agreeable conclusion.    1884 Boston (Mass.) Jrnl. 27 Oct. 2/3 At the Brooklyn barbecue, which Governor Cleveland recently attended, 5000 kegs of beer were dispensed.    1935 Words Mar. 6/2 Today the American countryside is heavily sprinkled with barbecue stands.    1938 D. Runyon Take it Easy 302 They are down in Florida running a barbecue stand.  

 

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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