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Keith_W
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Not "funny, funny," as such, but a couple of days ago I saw someone post on Twitter about a collapsible electric kettle, which the OP described as being perfect for travelers who wanted to make tea or coffee in their hotel rooms.

 

A commenter asked "Don't the hotel rooms have kettles, where you are?"

 

The wordless response was a TikTok "travel hack" video, of an enthusiastic 20-something using the hotel's kettle to boil his socks and underwear during a long stay.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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6 hours ago, lindag said:

AA13Gwer.img?w=800&h=415&q=60&m=2&f=jpg

I would love it if the owner of the syndication rights pulled together a book of just restaurant-related Hermans (there were a lot of those). I'd buy it in a heartbeat.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Yup, that's... enigmatic.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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On 11/11/2022 at 8:29 AM, gulfporter said:

I bought a small kitchen torch from Amazon and this is from the box.   ISO a recipe for roasting teeth molds.  

 

 

torch.jpg

 

Like to see someone weld with this or try to use it as a soldering iron (re. repairing household appliance).

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I am posting this because it’s funny and I remember it every time I make a dish that I’ve never heard of and has ingredients that I will have to find substitutes for things I have never tasted and someone who is very much a fan of the food asks me questions about how I did it, as happened yesterday.  I have a dread that I will sound goofy.  A little background first though.  In the 1990’s I posted a recipe I made for French Onion Soup.  It took a couple days to make because I made the stock from a La Technique recipe for stock (Part of the recipe for consommé ) and another recipe for caramelizing  onions.  A few days later someone told us about how she used my recipe. This is what was said:

 

I made Norm's French onion soup last weekend for guests and it was delicous! I even broke down and bought a bottle of sherry. I was confused in the store wether to get the cream sherry or plain sherry so I went with the cream. I mean what can go wrong with anything that has cream in it's name? LOL I didn't have beef bones and 6 hours to make my own stock. I found beef stock at the grocery but it was $3.25 for what looked like less than a quart! No way am I going to pay that much for stock, plus I recalled I have a small jar of demi glace from France in my cupboard I had indulged in but never opened yet. So I used regular canned beef broth and demi glace to taste. The recipe says it takes about an hour to cook the onions. I think I had my temp too low because it took me closer to 2 hours and I had to turn up the heat toward the end to get the brown carmel color. No problem though... I had plenty of kitchen chores to do and just needed to stir the onions ever so often. I toasted rustic bread slices on one side, buttered and sprinkled granular garlic on the other side, then toasted that side. I floated those on top of the soup and grated over some Edam cheese. The market I had been shopping in had their guyere cheese over priced in my opinion (6oz for $7.65!!!) so I substituted Edam. I hate shopping a regular grocery when imported or gourmet ingredients are on my list!!! Sams club is great for reasonable imported cheeses but I didn't have time to run by there. Edam cheese is a great melting cheese so it turned out fine. The soup was a hit. My dinner menu was French onion soup, my open face gyro type sandwich, and hot blueberry cobbler for dessert. I swear I have bruises on my back from all the complements I got for that dinner. The rich soup was nicely balanced by the fresh cucumbers, tomatoes, and garlicky yogurt of the gyro sandwich. And the sweet warm cobbler can't be beat on a winter night. Thanks again Norm for your delicous recipe and inspiration!

 

(name deleted) I thought a nice red wine would taste great in the soup too. I almost added some but I do try to stick to the recipe if it's the first time I'm trying it. I also thought a touch of soy sauce would have expanded the flavor levels too. Next time I'll get a bit bolder and try some variations. The thing I most liked about the soup was it's layers of flavors. The broth is so exotic tasting I just loved it, and Sunday morning when I woke up all I could think about was the leftover soup in the fridge. Ate the rest for breakfast!!!

Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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3 hours ago, Norm Matthews said:

I am posting this because it’s funny and I remember it every time I make a dish that I’ve never heard of and has ingredients that I will have to find substitutes for things I have never tasted and someone who is very much a fan of the food asks me questions about how I did it, as happened yesterday.  I have a dread that I will sound goofy.  A little background first though.  In the 1990’s I posted a recipe I made for French Onion Soup.  It took a couple days to make because I made the stock from a La Technique recipe for bouillon and another recipe for caramelizing  onions.  A few days later someone told us about how she used my recipe. This is what was said:

 

I made Norm's French onion soup last weekend for guests and it was delicous! I even broke down and bought a bottle of sherry. I was confused in the store wether to get the cream sherry or plain sherry so I went with the cream. I mean what can go wrong with anything that has cream in it's name? LOL I didn't have beef bones and 6 hours to make my own stock. I found beef stock at the grocery but it was $3.25 for what looked like less than a quart! No way am I going to pay that much for stock, plus I recalled I have a small jar of demi glace from France in my cupboard I had indulged in but never opened yet. So I used regular canned beef broth and demi glace to taste. The recipe says it takes about an hour to cook the onions. I think I had my temp too low because it took me closer to 2 hours and I had to turn up the heat toward the end to get the brown carmel color. No problem though... I had plenty of kitchen chores to do and just needed to stir the onions ever so often. I toasted rustic bread slices on one side, buttered and sprinkled granular garlic on the other side, then toasted that side. I floated those on top of the soup and grated over some Edam cheese. The market I had been shopping in had their guyere cheese over priced in my opinion (6oz for $7.65!!!) so I substituted Edam. I hate shopping a regular grocery when imported or gourmet ingredients are on my list!!! Sams club is great for reasonable imported cheeses but I didn't have time to run by there. Edam cheese is a great melting cheese so it turned out fine. The soup was a hit. My dinner menu was French onion soup, my open face gyro type sandwich, and hot blueberry cobbler for dessert. I swear I have bruises on my back from all the complements I got for that dinner. The rich soup was nicely balanced by the fresh cucumbers, tomatoes, and garlicky yogurt of the gyro sandwich. And the sweet warm cobbler can't be beat on a winter night. Thanks again Norm for your delicous recipe and inspiration!

 

(name deleted) I thought a nice red wine would taste great in the soup too. I almost added some but I do try to stick to the recipe if it's the first time I'm trying it. I also thought a touch of soy sauce would have expanded the flavor levels too. Next time I'll get a bit bolder and try some variations. The thing I most liked about the soup was it's layers of flavors. The broth is so exotic tasting I just loved it, and Sunday morning when I woke up all I could think about was the leftover soup in the fridge. Ate the rest for breakfast!!!

 

Oh Norm, this is priceless. How on earth did you respond?

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Saw this on Twitter:

3DB439AF-2FFF-451E-AB59-D7086B6FF004.thumb.jpeg.d7c8c25b4b9e4b014925b835c3aaa4b9.jpeg

I used to stop into the Archie McPhee store for grins when I was in Seattle for work so I went to their website to see if this was real. Indeed, they also offer candy canes in flavors that range from hot dog, ketchup and bacon (all kind of alarming as they look like regular red & white stripe canes), sardine, kale, pho, brisket, and more. 

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51 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

I used to stop into the Archie McPhee store for grins when I was in Seattle for work so I went to their website to see if this was real. Indeed, they also offer candy canes in flavors that range from hot dog, ketchup and bacon (all kind of alarming as they look like regular red & white stripe canes), sardine, kale, pho, brisket, and more. 

 

Looks like a fun store, though the candy canes don't really appeal to me. (Mac 'n cheese, for example, ha) But as they say, "We make weird."  🙂

 

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29 minutes ago, FauxPas said:

 

Looks like a fun store, though the candy canes don't really appeal to me. (Mac 'n cheese, for example, ha) But as they say, "We make weird."  🙂

 

Not sure if this is still the case but it was kind of a touristy place. Some of the gag items were quite witty and others just plain silly but fun to browse and I found several fun gifts there. 
Edited to add that if you are in need of a rubber chicken, this is a go-to!

Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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5 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

Not sure if this is still the case but it was kind of a touristy place. Some of the gag items were quite witty and others just plain silly but fun to browse and I found several fun gifts there. 

Ya I think the Caesar salad one would be fun for my nephew who went through a Caesar salad phase - his order at any restaurant. A gag gift as you note.

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2 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

Saw this on Twitter:

3DB439AF-2FFF-451E-AB59-D7086B6FF004.thumb.jpeg.d7c8c25b4b9e4b014925b835c3aaa4b9.jpeg

I used to stop into the Archie McPhee store for grins when I was in Seattle for work so I went to their website to see if this was real. Indeed, they also offer candy canes in flavors that range from hot dog, ketchup and bacon (all kind of alarming as they look like regular red & white stripe canes), sardine, kale, pho, brisket, and more. 

 

Shades of Bertie Botts' Every Flavor Beans, from the Harry Potter series!

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