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btbyrd

btbyrd

I agree with jimb0's post above, but would elaborate since you're immunocompromised (or at least pregnant). There's a difference between pasteurized and "safe to eat." If you're willing to eat a conventionally cooked medium-rare steak or a soft boiled egg (that didn't start out pasteurized) then you should have no qualms about eating food prepared SV according to recipes and guidelines from reputable sources (like ChefSteps, Anova, Modernist Cuisine, Doug Baldwin, and America's Test Kitchen). It is just as safe to eat as conventionally prepared food. But if you're trying to abide by strict guidelines in avoiding pathogens, SV offers you the additional advantage of being able to pasteurize foods that you couldn't normally consume (like a medium-rare steak). If you're looking for pasteurization times/temps, Doug Baldwin's Practical Guide to SV offers pasteurization tables for fish, poultry, and meat. Most SV ice cream base recipes (like those from ChefSteps and Anova) have you cook the base at 185F for an hour, after which it's going to be pasteurized (just be sure to agitate the bag a few times during cooking). Since you mentioned curds, I'll add that the same thing is true of ChefStep's lemon curd recipe (which cooks at 75C for an hour).

 

All that's to say, if you already have a Joule, I wouldn't go through the bother and expense of returning it in favor of the Breville/Polyscience unit. For the novice, the Joule is extremely helpful with its visual doneness features and in-app recipes. And if pasteurization is a concern, you can easily look up most of that information in tables. I realize that SV can be daunting to the beginner, but if you've got good recipes (many of which are in the Joule app) and some good online resources, there's no need to fear the technique -- even from a safety standpoint.

btbyrd

btbyrd

I agree with jimb0's post above, but would elaborate since you're immunocompromised (or at least pregnant). There's a difference between pasteurized and "safe to eat." If you're willing to eat a conventionally-cooked medium-rare steak or a soft boiled egg (that didn't start out pasteurized) then you should have no qualms about eating food prepared SV according to recipes and guidelines from reputable sources (like ChefSteps, Anova, Modernist Cuisine, Doug Baldwin, and America's Test Kitchen). It is just as safe to eat as conventionally prepared food. But if you're trying to abide by strict guidelines in avoiding pathogens, SV offers you the additional advantage of being able to pasteurize foods that you couldn't normally consume (like a medium-rare steak). If you're looking for pasteurization times/temps, Doug Baldwin's Practical Guide to SV offers pasteurization tables for fish, poultry, and meat. Most SV ice cream base recipes (like those from ChefSteps and Anova) have you cook the base at 185F for an hour, after which it's going to be pasteurized (just be sure to agitate the bag a few times during cooking). Since you mentioned curds, I'll add that the same thing is true of ChefStep's lemon curd recipe (which cooks at 75C for an hour).

 

All that's to say, if you already have a Joule, I wouldn't go through the bother and expense of returning it in favor of the Breville/Polyscience unit. For the novice, the Joule is extremely helpful with its visual doneness features and in-app recipes. And if pasteurization is a concern, you can easily look up most of that information in tables. I realize that SV can be daunting to the beginner, but if you've got good recipes (many of which are in the Joule app) and some good online resources, there's no need to fear the technique -- even from a safety standpoint.

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