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Vintage Cooking Booklets and Pamphlets


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3 hours ago, Smithy said:

It's interesting to see Mazola described as "liquid shortening". Is it the same product that we now call Mazola corn oil, or were there changes made?

 

I'm guessing Mazola was trying to compete with Crisco and remind people that you could fry chicken, etc., in Mazola. IMO, it's probably the same product.

 

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7 hours ago, MokaPot said:

 

I'm guessing Mazola was trying to compete with Crisco and remind people that you could fry chicken, etc., in Mazola. IMO, it's probably the same product.

 

I remember making quite excellent pie crust with corn oil.   Corn oil and milk, if I remember correctly.    And my still favorite carrot cake is made with oil.   

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20 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

The mention of "salad oil" reminds me of my mom years ago searching every grocery store she went into looking for "salad oil".  She would not believe that it was the same thing as vegetable oil and swore it tasted different.  😁

My Mother was the same, she used salad oil.

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13 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

I remember making quite excellent pie crust with corn oil.   Corn oil and milk, if I remember correctly.    And my still favorite carrot cake is made with oil.   

Me too, my best carrot cake I've been making for decades uses corn oil.  Keeps it really moist. 

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39 minutes ago, David Ross said:

Me too, my best carrot cake I've been making for decades uses corn oil.  Keeps it really moist. 

Ditto on the pumpkin and carrot cakes. Maybe the term shortening is associated with baking so they were getting you used to concept of oil in baked goods.

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A personal bias: I stay away from corn oil. When baking cakes, if I want a neutral oil I like to use Grapeseed. If I don't have any I will use Sunflower oil instead, but I think the flavor or Grapeseed oil is more appealing. I know there are downsides and upsides to various vegetable oils, some related to agribusiness practices and some related to health, and truthfully I don't know how to make much sense of it. 

 

Olive oil seems to be the healthiest choice, but that's a very specific choice when it comes to cakes. Canola is frequently specified for a variety of recipes and often for deep frying. But when it comes to Canola oil I'm like those people who think cilantro tastes like soap (not me!). To me Canola oil smells like fish, so I stay away from it.

 

And I agree that carrot cake often benefits from oil rather than butter, but it need not be corn oil to get the same results.

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19 minutes ago, Katie Meadow said:

And I agree that carrot cake often benefits from oil rather than butter, but it need not be corn oil to get the same results.

I just use vegetable oil and the one in the pantry from Kroger is soybean. After doing the olive oil orange cake I moved into olive with spice cake so sure it would be good with the carrot & pumpkin.  When it comes to vegetable oil I have to give props to Wesson for using Florence Henderson and her demonstration of how little is absorbed and you get a crisp crust. I think she was ith them for 25 years!  

 

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4 hours ago, heidih said:

I just use vegetable oil and the one in the pantry from Kroger is soybean. After doing the olive oil orange cake I moved into olive with spice cake so sure it would be good with the carrot & pumpkin.  When it comes to vegetable oil I have to give props to Wesson for using Florence Henderson and her demonstration of how little is absorbed and you get a crisp crust. I think she was ith them for 25 years!  

 

Looking closely she barely took a bit of that chicken, but it does look delicious to me.  

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12 minutes ago, David Ross said:

Looking closely she barely took a bit of that chicken, but it does look delicious to me.  

Poor dear said in an interview they would do 25 or more takes! They did get the crunch sound in there and maybe not on the one I linked but they did used to mention the right frying temp was a key though they credited the oil and not the cook . 

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On 1/14/2021 at 11:58 AM, Katie Meadow said:

A personal bias: I stay away from corn oil. When baking cakes, if I want a neutral oil I like to use Grapeseed. If I don't have any I will use Sunflower oil instead, but I think the flavor or Grapeseed oil is more appealing. I know there are downsides and upsides to various vegetable oils, some related to agribusiness practices and some related to health, and truthfully I don't know how to make much sense of it. 

 

Olive oil seems to be the healthiest choice, but that's a very specific choice when it comes to cakes. Canola is frequently specified for a variety of recipes and often for deep frying. But when it comes to Canola oil I'm like those people who think cilantro tastes like soap (not me!). To me Canola oil smells like fish, so I stay away from it.

 

And I agree that carrot cake often benefits from oil rather than butter, but it need not be corn oil to get the same results.

 

My bias, when baking cakes, if I want a neutral oil I use a different recipe.*  Though seriously, when I want a neutral cooking oil grapeseed is my choice.  The thought of Canola (sorry Canadians) makes me gag.  Canola tastes rancid even if it's not.  (Unlike girl scouts and girl scout cookies.)  For deep frying purposes I choose peanut oil.  I also keep sunflower oil on hand for many Georgian recipes that call for it.  Much olive oil passes my lips but I would not pretend it's neutral.

 

 

*I can't abide oil based cakes in general.  God created butter for a reason.

 

 

 

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9 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I can't abide oil based cakes in general.  God created butter for a reason.

Exactly what I learned from Nick Malgieri.

 

However, cakes specifically based on (good) olive oil because of where they are made and whose recipe it is, can be good.

 

Penelope Casas and Marcella Hazan are two I can think of.

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