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Vintage Cooking Booklets and Pamphlets


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OK, I’ll ask.... what IS it? A harmless cake or a frosted terrine of some sort?

Edited by BetD (log)
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"There are no mistakes in bread baking, only more bread crumbs"

*Bernard Clayton, Jr.

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Just a few of mine to add to the mix....

 

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"There are no mistakes in bread baking, only more bread crumbs"

*Bernard Clayton, Jr.

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1 hour ago, Kim Shook said:

1950 GE fridge.  Did mother’s really do matching mother/daughter outfits:

You should have seen my mom and I in the late 70's for Easter.......

 

 

I'm loving these....I'm seeing a bunch that I also have but also so many new ones!  Thanks all for sharing :) 

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33 minutes ago, Shelby said:

You should have seen my mom and I in the late 70's for Easter.......

 

 

I'm loving these....I'm seeing a bunch that I also have but also so many new ones!  Thanks all for sharing :) 

Oh yes mm + daughters. When someone brought us kilts (really red plaid) from a Scotland trip we were a sight to behold. The leather straps and giant safety pin.... I think the pattern companies like McCall, Simplicity, and Butterick even had taylored one to include adult & kid sizes. 

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Just now, heidih said:

McCall, Simplicity, and Butterick

Yeah, I'm sure either my mom or great grandmother made ours out of one of those patterns.  I remember being so cold (always cold in KS for Easter).  White fabric with pink rose buds (I think).  My mom may tell me I'm delusional lol.

 

And back to food....always a jello salad that looks very similar to a lot of things in these booklets lol.

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28 minutes ago, Shelby said:

And back to food....always a jello salad that looks very similar to a lot of things in these booklets lol.

Ahh Jello molds. A whole nother specialty topic. For some reason as a teen I had a beautiful fish one with lots of detail. Copper colored - I preferred it as wall decor. Had a little ring on one end to hang.  The book,ets and cookbooks made jello look so appealing - shimmery, glass like, and colorful.

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11 hours ago, Anna N said:

I have never eaten an MRE but I’ve always been fascinated by the concept of “meals ready to eat”. If I put my mind to it I can come up with many such meals that will be fast, tasty, nutritious and miles ahead of anything in the booklet. Think cheese and crackers, almost anything on toast. Nigel Slater is my go-to for MREs. I just forget to consult him often enough. And no matter what I say, if I see those initials my heart will beat a little faster and I will be unable to resist a little research. 

 

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/156507-mres-military-meals-ready-to-eat/?tab=comments#elShareItem_1648583589_menu

 

So sad they never continued with the topic.  I'm sure somewhere Mort Walker is smiling.

 

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13 hours ago, Anna N said:

I have never eaten an MRE but I’ve always been fascinated by the concept of “meals ready to eat”. If I put my mind to it I can come up with many such meals that will be fast, tasty, nutritious and miles ahead of anything in the booklet. Think cheese and crackers, almost anything on toast. Nigel Slater is my go-to for MREs. I just forget to consult him often enough. And no matter what I say, if I see those initials my heart will beat a little faster and I will be unable to resist a little research. 

If only Nigel Slater designed MREs for the armed forces. You may not have had an MRE as provided by the military, but I know you've had Spam, and that's the closest civilian relative I can think of. No toasters in the trenches--too much noise when they pop up. A dead giveaway if the toast flies out above ground.

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20 minutes ago, Katie Meadow said:

No toasters in the trenches--too much noise when they pop up. A dead giveaway if the toast flies out above ground.

 

You don't need a toaster to make toast!

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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5 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/156507-mres-military-meals-ready-to-eat/?tab=comments#elShareItem_1648583589_menu

 

So sad they never continued with the topic.  I'm sure somewhere Mort Walker is smiling.

 

Thanks. I was aware that that topic existed. I even remember seeing MRE’s at one point being offered at Costco. However, I don’t want a month’s worth! 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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3 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

As long as you have an APO.

 

 

Or a toasting fork and a flame. I very much doubt that any soldiers in the trenches in WW1 had ever even seen a pop-up toaster, largely because they hadn't yet been invented!

My mother still has her toasting fork and I have happy memories of making toast over the fire in the 1950s. She doesn't have an open fire now!

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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14 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

Or a toasting fork and a flame. I very much doubt that any soldiers in the trenches in WW1 had ever even seen a pop-up toaster, largely because they hadn't yet been invented!

My mother still has her toasting fork and I have happy memories of making toast over the fire in the 1950s. She doesn't have an open fire now!

Not sure how accurate my memory is but I believe that a toasting fork was an integral part of fireplace accoutrements back in the day. Like you I can recall toasting bread in front of the coal fire. I have no recollection of toasters of any sort. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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6 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Not sure how accurate my memory is but I believe that a toasting fork was an integral part of fireplace accoutrements back in the day. Like you I can recall toasting bread in front of the coal fire. I have no recollection of toasters of any sort. 

 

Exactly

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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6 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

Or a toasting fork and a flame. I very much doubt that any soldiers in the trenches in WW1 had ever even seen a pop-up toaster, largely because they hadn't yet been invented!

My mother still has her toasting fork and I have happy memories of making toast over the fire in the 1950s. She doesn't have an open fire now!

No personal electrical appliances in the trenches? Who knew? Not even a silent Sunbeam stealth toaster? Wherever you were hunkered down, if you were packing MRE's you probably didn't have sliced bread, either. Maybe a toast fork can be weaponized, because it wouldn't be very useful without a fire, which you also couldn't have. 

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9 hours ago, Anna N said:

Thanks. I was aware that that topic existed. I even remember seeing MRE’s at one point being offered at Costco. However, I don’t want a month’s worth! 

 

2021 could get worse.

 

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28 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

2021 could get worse.

 

And you suspect that MREs could improve it? 😂

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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  • 2 weeks later...

Jane Ashley's Newest Recipes for Better Meals, 1952.  Sponsored by the Corn Products Refining Company of NY.  There isn't a section devoted to what refined corn products are, but in the recipes you can see corn syrup, corn oil, corn starch and margarine.  The recipes look to be easy to prepare in the style of the times geared toward busy housewives.  

Vintage Cooking Booklets #1.jpeg

 

Vintage Cooking Booklets #2.jpeg

 

Vintage Cooking Booklets #3.jpeg

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It's interesting to see Mazola described as "liquid shortening". Is it the same product that we now call Mazola corn oil, or were there changes made?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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21 minutes ago, Smithy said:

It's interesting to see Mazola described as "liquid shortening". Is it the same product that we now call Mazola corn oil, or were there changes made?

That's what I think.  It reads like an attempt to come up with a term that will make it sound more appealing or something.

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3 hours ago, David Ross said:

Jane Ashley's Newest Recipes for Better Meals, 1952.  Sponsored by the Corn Products Refining Company of NY.  There isn't a section devoted to what refined corn products are, but in the recipes you can see corn syrup, corn oil, corn starch and margarine.  The recipes look to be easy to prepare in the style of the times geared toward busy housewives.  

Vintage Cooking Booklets #1.jpeg

 

Vintage Cooking Booklets #2.jpeg

 

Vintage Cooking Booklets #3.jpeg

The mention of "salad oil" reminds me of my mom years ago searching every grocery store she went into looking for "salad oil".  She would not believe that it was the same thing as vegetable oil and swore it tasted different.  😁

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