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Ganache: Tips, Techniques & Troubleshooting


schneich
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@pastrygirl@Jim D.Yes the goal is to keep the original fruit flavor as much as possible. I did not enjoy some of the fillings I made when I had to dilute it with cream/white chocolate.

 

Ill explore the pate de fruit and pdf guide that has recipes for fruit fillings, thank you.

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35 minutes ago, MikanPotatos said:

Yes the goal is to keep the original fruit flavor as much as possible. I did not enjoy some of the fillings I made when I had to dilute it with cream/white chocolate.

 

What did you use to flavor them?

 

Do look at Valrhona, the raspberry and yuzu are particularly intense. 

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On 5/18/2021 at 4:40 AM, MikanPotatos said:

Does anyone have any advice when creating a ganache with sour flavors such as fruit and you dont want to combine it with cream and chocolate. How would you be able to make a filling thick enough for it to be piped into a shell.

I agree with Jim. If you don't want cream, nor chocolate it's no longer a ganache. You could try to make a fruit 'ganache' from fruit puree with cocoa butter (and sugar) with the help of an emulsifier. Your best option is to make pate de fruit (PDF), which you can make both liquid and solid. Or fruit gel or syrup. Usually PDF is made solid into frames, then cut, then enrobed.

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On 5/17/2021 at 10:40 PM, MikanPotatos said:

Does anyone have any advice when creating a ganache with sour flavors such as fruit and you dont want to combine it with cream and chocolate. How would you be able to make a filling thick enough for it to be piped into a shell.

How about a buttercream filling

 

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  • 3 months later...

I make a filling that aims to mimic the tastes and texture of crème brûlée.  To get the crunch, I make a caramel (just sugar and water), let it harden, then grind it in a small food processor.  I put a 1/2 tsp. or so in the bottom of each cavity, then cover it with melted chocolate (with a little coconut oil to keep it from hardening too much).  On top of that I add a vanilla butter ganache (Greweling's eggnog but with no nutmeg or rum, just more vanilla).  The issue is the caramel bits.  In my notes on this recipe, I say sternly, "Don't attempt this on a humid day."  But recently it seems, regardless of the humidity, the ground caramel sticks together and forms a more or less solid mass in the bottom of the cavities before I can seal it with the white chocolate.  It makes for a less than ideal mouthfeel, more chewy than crunchy.  Can anyone think of something that might keep the bits separate?  Confectioner's sugar maybe?  I tried it, and it made a mess.  Am I simply limited to making this only in the dead of winter when the humidity is something like 30%?

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22 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

I make a filling that aims to mimic the tastes and texture of crème brûlée.  To get the crunch, I make a caramel (just sugar and water), let it harden, then grind it in a small food processor.  I put a 1/2 tsp. or so in the bottom of each cavity, then cover it with melted chocolate (with a little coconut oil to keep it from hardening too much).  On top of that I add a vanilla butter ganache (Greweling's eggnog but with no nutmeg or rum, just more vanilla).  The issue is the caramel bits.  In my notes on this recipe, I say sternly, "Don't attempt this on a humid day."  But recently it seems, regardless of the humidity, the ground caramel sticks together and forms a more or less solid mass in the bottom of the cavities before I can seal it with the white chocolate.  It makes for a less than ideal mouthfeel, more chewy than crunchy.  Can anyone think of something that might keep the bits separate?  Confectioner's sugar maybe?  I tried it, and it made a mess.  Am I simply limited to making this only in the dead of winter when the humidity is something like 30%?

Spread out and spray with plain cocoa butter?

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5 hours ago, Jim D. said:

 

Good idea.  It would be a mess, but part of what we do for our art!  Thanks.

What I've done for pop rocks is to put the pieces in a fine sieve and pour thinned chocolate over the top. Shake it around while the chocolate sets up.

 

I'm sure caramel bits would work similarly.

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8 hours ago, jbates said:

What I've done for pop rocks is to put the pieces in a fine sieve and pour thinned chocolate over the top. Shake it around while the chocolate sets up.

 

I'm sure caramel bits would work similarly.

 

That is an excellent idea.   Thank you.

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40 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

@Jim D. You could try adding fat to the caramel, making more of a butter crunch or English toffee. I think that would help. 

 

Thanks, I'll look into those ideas.  I ate one of the crème brûlée bonbons.  Once the caramel bits and buttercream plus dark chocolate shell get into the mouth, it all melts together.  To my relief (since these bonbons were requested for a wedding), there is some crunch and not too much gumminess.  I can tell it isn't exactly what was intended, but I don't think most people will notice.  I have some time to explore this before I do it again.  Sometimes, I should add, it works beautifully.  Those times must have been in January or February!

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