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Cooking with "This Will Make It Taste Good", by Vivian Howard


Shelby
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28 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@blue_dolphin 

 

interesting points about crispy-ness

 

what about browning for the maillard'd flavors ?

 

streamed colorful veg might be excellent ,

 

but browning them might give the dish something w more depth ?

 

That is where I stick them on a piece of foil after light oil coat and tuck under broiler. Caution - do not walk away or turn your back - but ti does get you the mentioned flavor boost. 

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This is my day off, and normally I'd be absolved from hauling books.  Thanks to amazon it was not to be.  The box was more than I could lift upstairs.  This Will Make It Taste Good is currently quarantining with its new friends.  I have plenty to read in the meantime.

 

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On 11/14/2020 at 9:07 AM, Anna N said:

I am hoping somebody will address this. Is it just me? I have read up on sauerkraut making and it seems the smell is a major problem for a lot of people. To put it in context, I love pickled daikon but I absolutely refuse to make it because it smells so bad to me. Even in a well sealed jar it seems to take over my whole refrigerator. Am I being overly sensitive to these smells? 

My father once made sauerkraut.   It started in a kitchen corner, migrated to an enclosed back porch before being banished to a free-standing garage.   I remember its stench and its journey but never eating any.

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On 11/13/2020 at 4:04 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:Does this mean I will have to buy a blender?

I am well served by a GOOD immersion blender.   Heartily rec a Bamix Pro.   -> silky smooth soups and sauces. No need to strain or sieve even when recipe says to.

 

 

 

 

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On 11/11/2020 at 6:18 AM, Maison Rustique said:

Trader Joe's sells a kraut that has Persian cucumbers in it--it is one of my favorite krauts!

 

With my zero level of experience eating sauerkraut, I was still a bit wary of whether or not mine was on track.  I decided to follow @Maison Rustique's recommendation and bought a jar of the Trader Joe's stuff.  I did a side by side taste test and they taste very similar.  The TJ's version lists garlic in the ingredients and I can taste it but it's not overwhelming.  I'm sure this would be a good sub in Vivian's recipes if you happen live in Trader Joe's land and don't want to make your own kraut. 

 

IMG_3305.thumb.jpeg.42fc4d2cd134d96c315be40eff1aee09.jpeg

 

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@blue_dolphin 

 

I have a  jar of TJ's in the refrigerator.  its been there for " Some Time "

 

but not opened .   i plan to 'refresh' this jar on a T's Blitz if I can remember

 

and use it for the sweet potato // bacon // kraut chowder.

 

thanks for letting us know it's similar.

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So I finally gathered up sufficient courage to dispose of my rotting cabbage. And now I have nothing but regret. I think it was probably perfectly fine. I was expecting the stench to be overwhelming but instead it was much, much less obvious and of a different nature altogether. But this information did not reach my very slow brain until it was much too late and the cabbage was not salvageable.

 

I am encouraged and will try this again when I can get some more cabbage and this time a  cucumber.   
 

Not quite sure how I will handle the ambient temperature issue. I have no garage and can no longer access the basement so finding a cool spot is going to be particularly challenging. 
 

Damn. Again!

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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4 hours ago, Anna N said:

Not quite sure how I will handle the ambient temperature issue. I have no garage and can no longer access the basement so finding a cool spot is going to be particularly challenging. 
 

 

A closet floor on an outer wall on the windward side of your home is probably the best bet. I've done that.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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3 hours ago, Anna N said:

So I finally gathered up sufficient courage to dispose of my rotting cabbage. And now I have nothing but regret. I think it was probably perfectly fine. I was expecting the stench to be overwhelming but instead it was much, much less obvious and of a different nature altogether. But this information did not reach my very slow brain until it was much too late and the cabbage was not salvageable.

 

I am encouraged and will try this again when I can get some more cabbage and this time a  cucumber.   
 

Not quite sure how I will handle the ambient temperature issue. I have no garage and can no longer access the basement so finding a cool spot is going to be particularly challenging. 
 

Damn. Again!

 

Drat! I know how you feel because I threw out a jar of salt preserved oranges not long ago.  They'd bubbled quite a bit early on (I think because the oranges are sweeter that lemons so more fuel for the microbes) and enough of the brine was pushed out of the jar that the top segments weren't completely submerged. By the time I noticed, some of the top segments had started to discolor.  Out of laziness, and assuming everything had gone bad, I cleaned up the overflow and set the jar aside to discard.  

I should have:

a) been more attentive to pick this up and 

b) topped it off with fresh lemon juice/salt brine to keep everything submerged.  

Anyway, as I upended the jar over the bin, I was greeted by the most delightful citrus aroma as I looked sadly down on the beautiful and aromatic orange segments now nestled atop a pile of used cat litter. 

Live and learn.  

 

Not sure what your ambient temps are like.  Vivian says around 70°F.  That kraut website I mentioned above says:

Quote

The ideal fermentation temperature is between 65 and 75°F (18–23°C). The lower the temperature, the slower the fermentation. The higher the temperature, the faster the fermentation. Ideally, you want the temperature to be somewhat stable, not fluctuating more than 5 degrees in either direction.

I'm challenged by the stable part. Like why is it summer again today (89°F) after a week of overnight freeze advisories? Sheesh!

 

Moving on, today, I had a lovely summer lunch of the Caesar Me Convinced p 222.   Herbdacious p 206 flavors the dressing.

1386171939_IMG_3309(1).thumb.jpeg.3b64145fa2202f62494d9cbdb30eeb73.jpeg

I made a half batch of the dressing.  Mine is green, rather than yellow as the book photo shows.  Not surprising given how bright green the Herbdacious is.  Mine is also more of a paste, not something that is easily "drizzled" into the food processor or blender but I did my best and it's very good.  Very, very good. 

Vivian says this is best on the day it's made.  Not sure whether I'd test that and try it tomorrow or eat another salad for dinner!

 

For the croutons, I followed one of the Herbdacious "No Brainer" tips and tossed some torn bread with it before toasting.  Here they are pre-toast:

IMG_3303.thumb.jpeg.3a63af7da775825cc888d77ad8bb7182.jpeg

 

And, for those still reading, my plumber arrived promptly at 7 AM as scheduled and I now have a new water heater, a freely draining sink and a shower valve that actually works.  I've got a load of wash in the dryer and another in the washer, I'm ever so excited about loading all food processor parts used above into the dishwasher and running it.  I'm going to give the kitchen a good scrubbing and then take a nice hot shower!

 

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@blue_dolphinThat looks absolutely scrumptious.  I need to make the herb thing.  I'm trying so hard not to go to the store, but since we're doing turkey day for the two of us, I need to sit down and see if there is anything I really need...

 

SO glad you got all your things repaired.  I know that's a load off of your mind!!

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7 minutes ago, Shelby said:

@blue_dolphinWhat herb did you use to round out the Herbdacious?  I know I can get dill, mint and cilantro but I don't think I can find chervil.

 In addition to the basil and parsley, I used a mix of mint, cilantro and dill. I was pretty generous with them because I had barely enough basil.  I think you can use what you like. I've got a ton of dill left and wondering how this would be with that as the main herb. 

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9 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

 In addition to the basil and parsley, I used a mix of mint, cilantro and dill. I was pretty generous with them because I had barely enough basil.  I think you can use what you like. I've got a ton of dill left and wondering how this would be with that as the main herb. 

A mix is smart.....I don't want it to be too herb heavy towards Italian (basil) or Mexican (cilantro).  I really want to go to the Asian Market but that would mean 3 stops tomorrow and that's not smart around here.

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1 hour ago, chromedome said:

 

A closet floor on an outer wall on the windward side of your home is probably the best bet. I've done that.

Yeah maybe.  I live in a stacked townhouse which means there is a dwelling above me and that two walls are shared with houses on either side of me. I have a front and a back door but as you can imagine, I am well insulated so it’s hard to find anywhere where the temperature differs. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 hour ago, blue_dolphin said:

I'm going to give the kitchen a good scrubbing and then take a nice hot shower!

That is wonderful news. I’m so happy for you. 
 

I would be inclined to grill the romaine halves. Just a thought. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I peeled some campari tomatoes to try the first batch of RW.  Mistake.  But with a happy ending.  The tomatoes just disintegrated into juice during the pickling.  So I added halved cherry tomatoes to make up for the lost chunks, which stretched the recipe to more than 2 quarts.   I have a lot of jar juice, which I just used to make a divine RW Bloody Mary.  RWBM.  I have a ice tea spoon in the Bloody Mary to snag the floating tomato halves and scallion pieces as I drink.  I went easy on the hot stuff for the first go.   I think I will keep it mild for the next batch.  Leave the tomato skins on unless you want juice.

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4 minutes ago, Anna N said:

That is wonderful news. I’m so happy for you. 
 

I would be inclined to grill the romaine halves. Just a thought. 

Grilled romaine is astounding!    Dress as you choose, balsamic and oil or a complex herbal, like Gribiche or Green Goddess or even ranch or thousand island.   You can't go wrong.

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5 minutes ago, lemniscate said:

I peeled some campari tomatoes to try the first batch of RW.  Mistake.  But with a happy ending.  The tomatoes just disintegrated into juice during the pickling.  So I added halved cherry tomatoes to make up for the lost chunks, which stretched the recipe to more than 2 quarts.   I have a lot of jar juice, which I just used to make a divine RW Bloody Mary.  RWBM.  I have a ice tea spoon in the BM to snag the floating tomato halves and scallion pieces as I drink.  I went easy on the hot stuff for the first go.   I think I will keep it mild for the next batch.  Leave the tomato skins on unless you want juice.

i would think that this is a function of ripeness.   I frequently blanch and peel Campari tomatoes without hazard.

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12 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

i would think that this is a function of ripeness.   I frequently blanch and peel Campari tomatoes without hazard.

Yep, I remember they were pretty ripe.  Vivian suggests sturdier romas, but I just use what is on the counter.  I'm all in on this tasty tomato brine juice though.  

 

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41 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I've started reading.  I note Whole Foods sells three offerings of Castelvetrano olives.  But I've already had my Whole Foods delivery for the day.  SupermarketItaly, my usual source for items like this has eight to choose from.  So confusing.

 

Keep reading. Many recipes with no olives to trouble you.

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I have to step in here to expose my Philistine refusal to circumscribe my cooking by recipe's demands for esoteric ingredients.    Call for green olives and I can pull a quality product from my larder; demand Castelvetrano and I need to stop, shop, order and wait for a jar which may...OR MAY NOT... substantially augment the quality of my eventual product.    So...I will try an interesting recipe with the most appropriate product from my pantry.    Judge the general gist of the recipe, and how my product melded into the ingredient mix.   Only after that point will I decide whether the ultra product is worthwhile.   

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