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Clam Soup with Mustard Greens


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Clam Soup with Mustard Greens - 车螺芥菜汤

 

1604614114_ClamandMustardGreenSoup800.jpg.1351458b75553517b4473f4e586dbbb2.jpg
 
This is a popular, light but peppery soup available in most restaurants here (even if its not listed on the menu). Also, very easy to make at home.


Ingredients


Clams. (around 8 to 10 per person. Some restaurants are stingy with the clams, but I like to be more generous). Fresh live clams are always used in China, but if, not available, I suppose frozen clams could be used. Not canned. The most common clams here are relatively small. Littleneck clams may be a good substitute in terms of size.
 
Stock. Chicken, fish or clam stock are preferable. Stock made from cubes or bouillon powder is acceptable, although fresh is always best.


Mustard Greens. (There are various types of mustard green. Those used here are  芥菜 , Mandarin: jiè cài; Cantonese: gai choy). Use a good handful per person. Remove the thick stems, to be used in another dish.)


Garlic. (to taste)


Chile. (One or two fresh hot red chiles are optional).


Salt.


MSG (optional). If you have used a stock cube or bouillon powder for the stock, omit the MSG. The cubes and power already have enough.


White pepper (freshly ground. I recommend adding what you consider to be slightly too much pepper, then adding half that again. The soup should be peppery, although of course everything is variable to taste.)


Method


Bring your stock to a boil. Add salt to taste along with MSG if using.


Finely chop the garlic and chile if using. Add to stock and simmer for about five minutes.


Make sure all the clams are tightly closed, discarding any which are open - they are dead and should not be eaten.


The clams will begin to pop open fairly quickly. Remove the open ones as quickly as possible and keep to one side while the others catch up. One or two clams may never open. These should also be discarded. When you have all the clams fished out of the boiling stock, roughly the tear the mustard leaves in two and drop them into the stock. Simmer for one minute. Put all the clams back into the stock and when it comes back to the boil, take off the heat and serve.

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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