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Corn Starch sauce turns watery/ savable for reheating?


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Wife away, so I went out to eat Asian.  BTW  not that easy to dine in now

 

Nothing special/  lets say it was a pepper beef/ spicy eggplant , what ever.

 

Ate it with a nice velveting sauce at restaurant/home.  But this always happens to me.

 

Go to eat it the next day and the sauce is water or watery.   Basically

 

Remedies?   

Its good to have Morels

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You could reheat it stovetop, and then add a touch more slurry. Or, as I often do, just drain off most of the sauce before reheating.

 

So many of these Chinese/American places overuse the cornstarch.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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It is a strange thing to re-heat and really who wants a gloppy starchy sauce, My personal preference is arrowroot. But that is not your point.  Cornstarch is a fickle ingredient via heat.

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Use modified cornstarch. I use a product called E-Z Gel. You can buy a 1lb package for $10 on amazon. It will last you a long time if you only use it for sauces you intend to refrigerate and reheat. It works great for making dipping sauces as well, and gravies.

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1 hour ago, FeChef said:

Use modified cornstarch. I use a product called E-Z Gel. You can buy a 1lb package for $10 on amazon. It will last you a long time if you only use it for sauces you intend to refrigerate and reheat. It works great for making dipping sauces as well, and gravies.

 

the problem is with leftover (mostly) Chinese restaurant food, not with food being made at home.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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On 8/26/2020 at 2:52 PM, weinoo said:

 

the problem is with leftover (mostly) Chinese restaurant food, not with food being made at home.

My solution still applies because E-Z Gel will thicken even cold liquids. I use it all the time with leftover chinese food.

Edited by FeChef (log)
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