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Hi all,

 

Hopefully someone can help me with this? :)

 

I really enjoy making tartalettes of sorts. When baking the dough rises a lot meaning that there is not really a lot of space to fill with something nice.

I am using glutenfree flour (Peak's All Purpose) and have tried blind baking them. But from my first blind baking try, it seems that the bottom stays raw. Have put it back in the oven 'unblinded' (can i use this term? :)) but still its not the way i want it.

 

Could sure use some tips on how to get these tartalettes nice and thin.

Thanks in advance to anyone who tries to help, i appreciate it.


regards

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What are you using as a blind bake filling? Many use beans,but I find that they are too big and don't press enough, so I use sugar.

Are you docking them well? Many holes are important for releasing air.

I'm not family with GF flour. But maybe try reducing the amount of liquids. More water results in more puffing.

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~ Shai N.

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11 minutes ago, shain said:

What are you using as a blind bake filling? Many use beans,but I find that they are too big and don't press enough, so I use sugar.

 

Interesting!  And the toasted sugar could be a tasty extra bonus.  I dislike the smell of baking beans so I use rice. 

 

 

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Seems like you are using the wrong recipe. If you post recipe and cooking method (temperature and time) then it's easier to try to help you.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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16 hours ago, teonzo said:

Seems like you are using the wrong recipe. If you post recipe and cooking method (temperature and time) then it's easier to try to help you.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Hi Teo,

 

I am using this recipe:

- 120gr Flower

- 50gr powdered sugar

- 20gr almondflower

- little bit of salt

- 75gr cold butter

- 1tablespoon ei

 

baking it for 12 minutes blind on 170 celsius convection oven. Thanks in advance!

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18 hours ago, shain said:

What are you using as a blind bake filling? Many use beans,but I find that they are too big and don't press enough, so I use sugar.

Are you docking them well? Many holes are important for releasing air.

I'm not family with GF flour. But maybe try reducing the amount of liquids. More water results in more puffing.

Hi Shain,

 

I am using baking beans made which are not edible beans (stone hard pebbles).

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1 hour ago, Paullie said:

Hi Shain,

 

I am using baking beans made which are not edible beans (stone hard pebbles).

 

Those are often better, just make sure they are heavy and dense enough to apply strong, even pressure.

~ Shai N.

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23 hours ago, shain said:

What are you using as a blind bake filling? Many use beans,but I find that they are too big and don't press enough, so I use sugar.

 

Doesn't the sugar melt at that temperature? If not, why not? Does the dough insulate it?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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1 hour ago, Smithy said:

 

Doesn't the sugar melt at that temperature? If not, why not? Does the dough insulate it?

 

Sugar does not melt.  It decomposes at 186C.*  @Paullie is baking at 170C so should be no problem.

 

 

*which is how the Harvard cooking class wanted you to test your oven.

 

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35 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Sugar does not melt.  It decomposes at 186C.*  @Paullie is baking at 170C so should be no problem.

 

 

*which is how the Harvard cooking class wanted you to test your oven.

 

 

I remembered the 366F and the test, which was when I discovered that my oven wildly overshoots its target temperature. I hadn't remembered that it's decomposition instead of melting, as such. I also hadn't noticed the 170C baking temp, which makes my question moot. Thanks for the corrections.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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22 hours ago, Paullie said:

- 1tablespoon ei

 

I suppose you forgot to translate this from your native language and it should be water, right?

 

When writing a recipe you should write not only the list of ingredients, but everything, including the method you use for making the dough. You are asking for help, it's your interest to put the other people in the best conditions to help you.

 

First of all, you are not using a chemical leavener, this is a good start.
If your dough rises a lot during baking then it means there are lots of little air bubbles in the raw dough that expand during baking and traps the vapor that forms during baking.
The most probable causes are:
- wrong mixing method, you are overworking it (if you are creaming the butter even worse);
- almond flour, it helps a lot to add air bubbles since it's much coarser than the other flours;
- too much water that becomes vapor;
- xanthan gum, gluten free flours usually include xanthan gum, if you overmix it with water then you end up with lots of bubbles.
My suggestion is this one. Take out the almond flour. Put the gluten free flour with cold butter in a food processor, blitz to get a fine powder (no butter pieces), it takes less than 10 seconds. Add sugar and salt, blitz for a couple of seconds. Add water (the minimum possible, 1 tablespoon is about 15 g, for that amount of flour 10 g should be enough) and mix until a dough starts forming (10-15 seconds). Done. If you have a vacuum chamber machine, then put the dough in it (no bag, just the dough) and run a cycle to get out all the air bubbles.
If you want thin crust, you need to roll it thin.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Teo

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On 8/17/2020 at 1:27 PM, teonzo said:

 

I suppose you forgot to translate this from your native language and it should be water, right?

 

When writing a recipe you should write not only the list of ingredients, but everything, including the method you use for making the dough. You are asking for help, it's your interest to put the other people in the best conditions to help you.

 

First of all, you are not using a chemical leavener, this is a good start.
If your dough rises a lot during baking then it means there are lots of little air bubbles in the raw dough that expand during baking and traps the vapor that forms during baking.
The most probable causes are:
- wrong mixing method, you are overworking it (if you are creaming the butter even worse);
- almond flour, it helps a lot to add air bubbles since it's much coarser than the other flours;
- too much water that becomes vapor;
- xanthan gum, gluten free flours usually include xanthan gum, if you overmix it with water then you end up with lots of bubbles.
My suggestion is this one. Take out the almond flour. Put the gluten free flour with cold butter in a food processor, blitz to get a fine powder (no butter pieces), it takes less than 10 seconds. Add sugar and salt, blitz for a couple of seconds. Add water (the minimum possible, 1 tablespoon is about 15 g, for that amount of flour 10 g should be enough) and mix until a dough starts forming (10-15 seconds). Done. If you have a vacuum chamber machine, then put the dough in it (no bag, just the dough) and run a cycle to get out all the air bubbles.
If you want thin crust, you need to roll it thin.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Hi Teo,

 

Thanks for your advice, I will surely try it with the almond flour removed.

 

The 'Ei' part is Egg (it's dutch i forgot to translate). So no water is added in my recipe.

I normally put together the flours, salt, sugar and butter. Then kneed everything by hand into a sort of crumble dough. Then I add a tablespoon of egg and roll everything into a ball and put it in the fridge for an hour. I think that using a food processor is also a good trick and will surely try it next with the removed almond flour. The recipe i have is not a glutenfree recipe by default, i just replaced the flour.

 

Thanks for your advice I really appreciate it.

 

Regards!

 

PS.

- wrong mixing method, you are overworking it (if you are creaming the butter even worse);

This could also be the case for me... will be sure to keep this one in mind

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