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TicTac

Shrimp in Lobster Sauce

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A quick query of the boards did not return any results on the topic (apologies if I missed it!).

 

After doing a bit of research on this recipe which I have enjoyed a few times in the past at restaurants, I realized what I had suspected all along - there is no trace of lobster anywhere to be found!

 

Wonder why they would call it that then...

 

Anyhoooo...loving both shrimp and lobster, and having both some Argentinian shrimp and lobster stock in the freezer, I thought I might take a stab at making this dish, well; legit!

 

I have some fresh dug from the garden baby potatoes that I am contemplating cooking in the lobster stock as I reduce it by half, I think that might be nice.

 

Also toying with the herbs for this dish, traditionally its just green onion, but I am thinking a bay leaf, some parsley and chives would work as well...might have to sub white wine for shaoxing...

 

Would love to hear any experiences with this recipe and any brainstorming as to how to elevate it even further!

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Ummm google presents  https://thewoksoflife.com/shrimp-lobster-sauce/   https://www.food.com/recipe/chinese-lobster-sauce-323257   https://rasamalaysia.com/shrimp-with-lobster-sauce/

No lobster involved - like fish fragrant eggplant - no fish. But since you have lobster stock and lovely new potatoes - I say experiment to your own taste. 

From Fuchsia Dunlop They call this complex flavor “fish-fragrant” because it draws on the seasonings used in Sichuanese fish cooking, so it is supposed to recall to those who eat it the taste of fish.


Edited by heidih (log)
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I read all those recipes which led me to the post above -

 

Very strange (and misleading) dish names!  Fish Fragrant eggplant, to me at least, sounds like a bit of a turn-off (I have had the dish and enjoyed it). 

 

Was curious if anyone ever tried to create a 'real' version of the named dish!

 

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, TicTac said:

Very strange (and misleading) dish names!  Fish Fragrant eggplant, to me at least, sounds like a bit of a turn-off (I have had the dish and enjoyed it). 

 

 

It isn't misleading in Chinese. It's kind of a bad translation, but I've never really been able to improve it.

 

It refers to the dish including flavourings which were considered more common in fish dishes. 

 

Today, it is more associated with the eggplant dish.


Edited by liuzhou (log)

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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I'm guessing you came upon the history of the missing lobster?   Wiki - "Lobster sauce" was invented in North America by Chinese restaurateurs inspired by a method of preparing lobster in Cantonese cuisine where ginger, green onions, and soy sauce were used as stir-fry seasoning.[1] The seasoning mixture was made into a sauce that was used in cooking lobster. Due to the cost of serving lobster for restaurateurs and their customers, shrimp was eventually substituted in the recipe resulting in a dish commonly known as "Shrimp with Lobster Sauce" (Chinese: 蝦龍糊).[2][1]

 

I don't see ginger in the 3 recipes above as mentioned in the wiki but I'd grate some in during stir fry and prob add a bit more heat in addition to the white pepper.  I want to make this now too  : )

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That wasn't chicken

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Well back in the day in America when "Chinese food" was being developed by enterprising immigrants there was little fresh ginger. - but yes needed. But as the original poster noted he or she has some great ingredients that can be purposed for an interesting and unique to that person dish.  I am the idiot who posted a recipe for osso buco that included cream sherry. We have had authenticity discussions before and it is like having a political discussion - waste of time ;)   

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Interesting roots of the dish!

 

Makes sense.

 

This is not by any means meant to be an 'authenticity' discussion, rather - how can I make this dish, that sounds so good by name, into an actual reality!  lol.

 

It will happen, whether it will taste good is to be seen....but how can it not, given the players involved!!!

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Yea, that's where I was going,.  Take the standard, which I've enjoyed, but always felt could benefit from a bit of tweaking.  Any crab meat in the freezer? 🧐 


Edited by Eatmywords (log)

That wasn't chicken

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1 hour ago, Eatmywords said:

Yea, that's where I was going,.  Take the standard, which I've enjoyed, but always felt could benefit from a bit of tweaking.  Any crab meat in the freezer? 🧐 

 

Sadly, no.  Not a typical item found in my house, as my wife is allergic to shellfish - only recently have I carefully prepared clams (then frozen for future use) and bought frozen Argentine shrimp for outdoor grilling.

 

Oddly enough, she is fine with the smell of steamed lobster (score for me!!).

 

So far, additions to the dish include garlic scapes, some fresh Egyptian onions and fresh bay leaf.  We will see where we travel down the flavor path from there....

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Not loving the bay  leaf - but that is my quirk  I find it too strong with seafood unless tons of garlic and tomato are taking charge


Edited by heidih (log)

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Fair do's

 

Admittedly I did not it want to detract from the subtle nuances of the lobster stock so I only put about 1/4 of a fresh leaf in.

 

Potatoes turned out very nice, certainly can taste the lobster stock.  I started them in it from an ice cold stock - makes for nice even tater cooking.

 

Just waiting for the rest of the crew to return from the pool then I will begin execution!

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Interesting on starting from cold - more absorption maybe. The pool does whet appetite :)

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Cooking taters from cold makes for a more even and gentle cook - a trick I learned from our late friend Mr. Bocuse.

 

the parsley was superfluous, but the rest of the dish was quite tasty albeit mild...

8406AFF9-B37C-4D9A-B61C-9C9DD5D557BB.thumb.jpeg.2079c1b10085b018f69f5afd8aefdf7f.jpeg

 

 

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11 hours ago, TicTac said:

 the rest of the dish was quite tasty albeit mild...

 

 

As I was going through the recipes, I noticed that two had soy sauce in varying amounts, but none had msg.  I think, in terms of aesthetics, soy sauce is too dark for lobster sauce, but it could definitely use more umami than the stock provides. Bouillon might be better than pure Accent.  I've always considered lobster sauce to be a very close cousin to egg drop soup, and that's bouillon city. Additional umami should go a long ways towards resolving the mildness. Unless, of course, you prefer it mild.

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14 hours ago, heidih said:

Interesting on starting from cold - more absorption maybe. The pool does whet appetite :)

Always start root vegetables like potatoes in cold...I think that's one of the first things they taught us.

 

And where's the pork in that lobster sauce?!

 

 


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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33 minutes ago, weinoo said:

And where's the pork in that lobster sauce?!


That would be mobster sauce ...

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21 minutes ago, Duvel said:


That would be mobster sauce ...

Pork AND Lobster...now that would make my Bubbie roll over...Oy Vey!

 

Next time I would add an additional source of umami to this dish to give it another layer of flavour and a bit more body - one thought would be some nice wild mushrooms...we shall see.

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3 minutes ago, TicTac said:

Pork AND Lobster...now that would make my Bubbie roll over...Oy Vey!

 

Next time I would add an additional source of umami to this dish to give it another layer of flavour and a bit more body - one thought would be some nice wild mushrooms...we shall see.

 

I get it. Mushrooms were my thought even  before I read your sentence. I don't think you need to go to wild unless they are inexpensively readily available. We have discussed dry fried and roasted ordinary kids before- nice texture and flavor.

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Luckily I pick mushrooms every fall, so I often have a stash of frozen ones. 

 

Oddly enough my local Longo's sells dried porcini at $5 for around 150 or 200g - so that's also a (decent) option!

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7 hours ago, TicTac said:

Pork AND Lobster...now that would make my Bubbie roll over...Oy Vey!

 

Next time I would add an additional source of umami to this dish to give it another layer of flavour and a bit more body - one thought would be some nice wild mushrooms...we shall see.

If you are looking for serious umami, you can't go past kombu (dried sea kelp, mostly Korean these days). Simply put a piece or two in your cold stock for three hours or so before cooking. You could also gently heat the stock and put the kombu in the warm stock (do not boil). Using sea kelp with seafood seems appropriate. 

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Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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I would assume, if you want the name to make sense, sub out the chicken stock for your lobster stock. I imagine it would be even better then the original.

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3 hours ago, FeChef said:

I would assume, if you want the name to make sense, sub out the chicken stock for your lobster stock. I imagine it would be even better then the original.

 

That is precisely what I did in this experiment.

 

:)

 

 

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