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wannabechocolatier

Homemade Chinese noodles vs store bought?

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Just bought these. Fresh rice noodles. 0.80元 / 240 grams. That is 11 cents USD. Why would anyone want to make their own?

 

1611773411_ricenoodles.thumb.jpg.b06171d32f7c865dbc68e140feb1ee1a.jpg

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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Posted (edited)
16 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Just bought these. Fresh rice noodles. 0.80元 / 240 grams. That is 11 cents USD. Why would anyone want to make their own?

 

Wow, that's incredibly cheap. I can understand why buying would be the first option at that price. I'm sure I'll be buying some here as well, but probably at least 10x that price. Still cheap, but not incredibly cheap.

 

The reason I want to make my own is just because I like learning new things and skills.

Lately I've been fascinated by China's food and its incredibly long, contiguous history. Prior to this, when noodles came to mind I'd automatically think about ramen or pasta. Yet, as it turns out, pasta was only introduced to the western world in the 1300s and ramen to Japan in the 1800s, with the dish only picking up in popularity in the 1900s. Meanwhile, the oldest physical noodle found in China is 4,000 years old! Who knows how much older the actual practice is. Incredibly fascinating. 

 

I just wish China and its people were more integrated with the outside world so that everyone could enjoy its offerings more easily, but I guess their government has other plans. Kind of a shame. Prior to this, I also didn't have as well a grasp on how large the country is, as well as the amount of variance among its residents. 

 

Also, I suppose the sheer difference between what I'm used to in the US and China makes it a lot more interesting for me as well.


Edited by wannabechocolatier (log)

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My granddaughter is a student of Mandarin, she has made three trips to China.  She likes noodles.

 

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On 7/24/2020 at 9:13 AM, Margaret Pilgrim said:

I am lucky to live 5 minutes from San Francisco’s second Chinatown.


Where is San Francisco’s second Chinatown?  Are you talking about Stockton vs Grant?  I always prefer Stockton, but curious if there’s someplace even better. 


Mark

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11 minutes ago, mgaretz said:


Where is San Francisco’s second Chinatown?  Are you talking about Stockton vs Grant?  I always prefer Stockton, but curious if there’s someplace even better. 

 

Clement Street in the Richmond District?

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, mgaretz said:


Where is San Francisco’s second Chinatown?  Are you talking about Stockton vs Grant?  I always prefer Stockton, but curious if there’s someplace even better. 

Clement St which is a 15 minute one bus ride from Grant and.Stockton @ Sacramento St.   Three generations ago the young people moved west to this neighborhood which was very simple for their parents to access.

Subsequent generations have located south on outer Bslboa, Irving,  Noriega and Taraval, all a bus ride away from Clement St.


Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)
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5 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Clement St which is a 15 minute one bus ride from Grant and.Stockton @ Sacramento St.   Three generations ago the young people moved west to this neighborhood which was very simple for their parents to access.

Subsequent generations have located south on outer Bslboa, Irving,  Noriega and Taraval, all a bus ride away from Clement St.

 

 

Between Arguello and 25th St?


Mark

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My T shirt site: Guy Bling

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3 minutes ago, mgaretz said:

 

Between Arguello and 25th St?

Exactly, almost.    25th Avenue.    And a bus runs on 25th Avenue connecting Clement (actually The Golden Gate Bridge) and the "new" Asian areas (Balboa, Irving, Noriega, Taraval).

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When I first moved to the Bay Area I lived just off Clement. I have no idea what it's like these days, although those restaurants that specialized in Dungeness Crab are still going strong I think, but in those days (the late 70's) there was a bountiful mix of Chinese and Russian Orthodox restaurants and groceries. My next move in SF was to the border of the Stockton/Grant Chinatown. I lived right over the cable car tracks. I ate a LOT of Chinese food.

 

When I moved across the bridge to Oakland I had to drive to Oakland Chinatown for supplies. Been doing that since the mid-80's and have my routine down: my favorite groceries, the place I get my roast duck, the place for live crab, the best pork buns, the best fresh noodles, and so on. I am still on strict self imposed lockdown, so things are different now. No duck. No street food. Just the basics for stir fry. The thing I miss most is the variety of fresh noodles: three different thicknesses of potsticker or wonton wrappers and all sizes of fresh extruded wheat noodles. And no, I'm not about to make my own noodles or skins. That ship has sailed. 

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