Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Help with liqueured fruit please


Recommended Posts

About two weeks ago I made a jar of oranges in brandy.  I think the seal is bad and the fruit has started fermenting. There’s a few bubbles and a slightly sour smell, the taste is still sweet.
 

The oranges were off our tree (no spray) and it’s a simple no cook recipe that calls for sugar, brandy and spices. The jar was sterilised. 

What would you do ? Is there a way to rescue them, are they still safe to eat ?

Any advice will be much appreciated.

662E9AA9-C7E7-4EFC-849D-78E2B09B8047.thumb.jpeg.556c4e87e38b8bd4da5c095e4a95e9f0.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you're correct in that fermentation has begun. I would place the bottle in the refrigerator right away, maybe even swap out the container. Yes, I'd drink / eat it. I have kind of an iron stomach, though, knock on wood.

 

For future projects, I'd pour more brandy or liquid in there, i.e., no oranges or cinnamon bark exposed to the air (everything submerged).

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, MokaPot said:

I think you're correct in that fermentation has begun. I would place the bottle in the refrigerator right away, maybe even swap out the container. Yes, I'd drink / eat it. I have kind of an iron stomach, though, knock on wood.

 

For future projects, I'd pour more brandy or liquid in there, i.e., no oranges or cinnamon bark exposed to the air (everything submerged).


Thank you ! 
 

I suspect the problem started when we, err, sampled a bit on Monday evening, thus leaving fruit and bark exposed. It’s now in the fridge, will see how we go. Fellow cast ironers here. 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, sartoric said:

It’s now in the fridge, will see how we go

 

If you've got something in a glass bottle with a wire bale closure and think the contents may have begun to ferment, I'd recommend leaving the wire bale closure open or at least place the bottle into a secondary container large enough to contain the contents in case the bottle fails.

I almost put this over in the "I will never...." thread but forgot.  I recently had a liter of elderflower cordial distribute itself all over the inside of my fridge.  It was on the top shelf, in the back and ended up all over everything on every shelf, including all the door bins.  You don't want to clean up a sticky mess like that!

 

  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

If you've got something in a glass bottle with a wire bale closure and think the contents may have begun to ferment, I'd recommend leaving the wire bale closure open or at least place the bottle into a secondary container large enough to contain the contents in case the bottle fails.

I almost put this over in the "I will never...." thread but forgot.  I recently had a liter of elderflower cordial distribute itself all over the inside of my fridge.  It was on the top shelf, in the back and ended up all over everything on every shelf, including all the door bins.  You don't want to clean up a sticky mess like that!

 


Ran to fridge and undid the clasp. Thank you !

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

A long time ago , my mother used to make a Finish drink called

 

Sima

 

https://www.thespruceeats.com/finnish-spring-mead-sima-2952646

 

I thought it was called Simi , but that didn't come up

 

we had it in Finland  and its easy to make

 

she used Safeway's brand BrowbDerby beer bottles , w a screw top

 

that's what my father drank.

 

its  a lightly fermented ted lemonade  , w a hint of raisins

 

to make ke it , you needed a tight container so  the COgenerated by the yeast

 

made it slightly bubbly .   

 

she made a case full at a time   ( Brown Derby 1 qt bottles )

 

it fermented in the pantry for s certain period at room temp

 

you chilled it in the refrigerator , the drank it

 

it was nice

 

then one day a bottle , in the evening , exploded in the pantry

 

no more Simi or Sima was made

 

fermentation releases CO2

 

thus champagne 

 

you want bubbles , get a sturdy container 

 

that's shy champaign bottle are thicker than regular wine

 

if you dont want bubbles , vent the container

 

simple

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/11/2020 at 4:44 PM, rotuts said:

A long time ago , my mother used to make a Finish drink called

 

Sima

 

https://www.thespruceeats.com/finnish-spring-mead-sima-2952646

 

I thought it was called Simi , but that didn't come up

 

we had it in Finland  and its easy to make

 

she used Safeway's brand BrowbDerby beer bottles , w a screw top

 

that's what my father drank.

 

its  a lightly fermented ted lemonade  , w a hint of raisins

 

to make ke it , you needed a tight container so  the COgenerated by the yeast

 

made it slightly bubbly .   

 

she made a case full at a time   ( Brown Derby 1 qt bottles )

 

it fermented in the pantry for s certain period at room temp

 

you chilled it in the refrigerator , the drank it

 

it was nice

 

then one day a bottle , in the evening , exploded in the pantry

 

no more Simi or Sima was made

 

fermentation releases CO2

 

thus champagne 

 

you want bubbles , get a sturdy container 

 

that's shy champaign bottle are thicker than regular wine

 

if you dont want bubbles , vent the container

 

simple

 

 

 

 


Thanks for the info @rotuts.
 

Anyways, it went in the fridge with lid ajar. Tonight I felt brave enough to try it. Slightly sour, but also sweet from the sugar and brandy.  We ate the oranges with a little pouring cream from the local dairy farmer.
Sorry I didn’t take a photo, but imagine a few orange segments with thin cream and there it is.

Hoping we don’t get sick and die tonight xx.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By ShylahSinger
      Help! I am an amateur and make chocolate truffles, bonbons, and caramels for friends and family. I made some soft caramel for filling molded bonbons. The flavor and consistency are fine, but the caramel is filled with bubbles. I don't know how to get the air bubbles out, and am concerned using it in my molded chocolates. I would like to know if it is okay to use. I have been making confections for about four years and this is the first time this has happened. I would really appreciate any help! I'm new to the forum and don't know anyone yet.
    • By cc.canuck
      I'm relatively new to chocolate making but now that I've finally got the hang of tempering (by hand using the seeding method) I'd like to work on incorporating less air during the process.
       
      I mainly make bars at the moment so I can tap out air bubbles after filling but I want to start making dipped biscuits and that's not going to work! I've watched oh so many videos of people stirring their chocolate while tempering and can't pick up any nuances that make their process different to mine, though they clearly have significantly less air in their mixture.
       
      Any ideas how I could fix this problem or should I consider incorporating air bubbles into my biscuit design?
    • By amyneill
      Hi all!! 
      I work at an amazing little New Zealand Style ice cream shop in the beautiful Denver Colorado. I was hoping to get a little help on the subject of adding fruit into ice cream after extracting it and ensuring that, when the ice cream is frozen, the fruity bits don't turn into rock hard shards. I am planning on doing a cherry chocolate ice cream and I was going to soak some dried cherries that we're no longer using for something else. I was planning on using some brandy and a ton of sugar, but I was really hoping someone had a tried and true method they could send my way so that I KNOW that the fruit will be luscious as it's frozen. If you have a certain sugar ratio. I know there is the brix test, but to be honest it's been many years since pastry school and I am very rusty. Would love to hear from some of my fellow sugar-heads. 
      Thank you!
      Amy
       
    • By amyneill
      Hi all! I just wanted to pop in here and see if anyone had some advice on canning/jarring caramel sauce for ready-to-eat consumption. The ice cream shop I work at is putting together gift baskets for valentine's day and we wanted to toss in some caramel and fudge jars in to add some tasty treats. We have a recipe that works great in the shop in our squeeze bottles for topping the ice cream, however I don't have a ton of experience with the canning process to make it shelf stable and shippable. I've canned tomato sauce and salsa in the past, but my method wouldn't be efficient for canning hundreds of jars for consumption. What is your method for success? Does it all hinge on the sealing process, and if so what are your favorite (cost efficient) products? Do you know of a jar that is self sealing or more durable than others?
      Thanks for any suggestions! 
    • By artiesel
      Does anyone know if using a high-protein flour, rather than AP flour, in a quickbread formula could create a gummy texture as a result of the protein slightly developing as it absorbs water?
       
      I was attempting to reduce water activity in the formula by using flour with 14% protein rather than 8-10% protein. Am I out in left field on this one?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...