Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

sartoric

Help with liqueured fruit please

Recommended Posts

About two weeks ago I made a jar of oranges in brandy.  I think the seal is bad and the fruit has started fermenting. There’s a few bubbles and a slightly sour smell, the taste is still sweet.
 

The oranges were off our tree (no spray) and it’s a simple no cook recipe that calls for sugar, brandy and spices. The jar was sterilised. 

What would you do ? Is there a way to rescue them, are they still safe to eat ?

Any advice will be much appreciated.

662E9AA9-C7E7-4EFC-849D-78E2B09B8047.thumb.jpeg.556c4e87e38b8bd4da5c095e4a95e9f0.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you're correct in that fermentation has begun. I would place the bottle in the refrigerator right away, maybe even swap out the container. Yes, I'd drink / eat it. I have kind of an iron stomach, though, knock on wood.

 

For future projects, I'd pour more brandy or liquid in there, i.e., no oranges or cinnamon bark exposed to the air (everything submerged).

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, MokaPot said:

I think you're correct in that fermentation has begun. I would place the bottle in the refrigerator right away, maybe even swap out the container. Yes, I'd drink / eat it. I have kind of an iron stomach, though, knock on wood.

 

For future projects, I'd pour more brandy or liquid in there, i.e., no oranges or cinnamon bark exposed to the air (everything submerged).


Thank you ! 
 

I suspect the problem started when we, err, sampled a bit on Monday evening, thus leaving fruit and bark exposed. It’s now in the fridge, will see how we go. Fellow cast ironers here. 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, sartoric said:

It’s now in the fridge, will see how we go

 

If you've got something in a glass bottle with a wire bale closure and think the contents may have begun to ferment, I'd recommend leaving the wire bale closure open or at least place the bottle into a secondary container large enough to contain the contents in case the bottle fails.

I almost put this over in the "I will never...." thread but forgot.  I recently had a liter of elderflower cordial distribute itself all over the inside of my fridge.  It was on the top shelf, in the back and ended up all over everything on every shelf, including all the door bins.  You don't want to clean up a sticky mess like that!

 

  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

If you've got something in a glass bottle with a wire bale closure and think the contents may have begun to ferment, I'd recommend leaving the wire bale closure open or at least place the bottle into a secondary container large enough to contain the contents in case the bottle fails.

I almost put this over in the "I will never...." thread but forgot.  I recently had a liter of elderflower cordial distribute itself all over the inside of my fridge.  It was on the top shelf, in the back and ended up all over everything on every shelf, including all the door bins.  You don't want to clean up a sticky mess like that!

 


Ran to fridge and undid the clasp. Thank you !

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A long time ago , my mother used to make a Finish drink called

 

Sima

 

https://www.thespruceeats.com/finnish-spring-mead-sima-2952646

 

I thought it was called Simi , but that didn't come up

 

we had it in Finland  and its easy to make

 

she used Safeway's brand BrowbDerby beer bottles , w a screw top

 

that's what my father drank.

 

its  a lightly fermented ted lemonade  , w a hint of raisins

 

to make ke it , you needed a tight container so  the COgenerated by the yeast

 

made it slightly bubbly .   

 

she made a case full at a time   ( Brown Derby 1 qt bottles )

 

it fermented in the pantry for s certain period at room temp

 

you chilled it in the refrigerator , the drank it

 

it was nice

 

then one day a bottle , in the evening , exploded in the pantry

 

no more Simi or Sima was made

 

fermentation releases CO2

 

thus champagne 

 

you want bubbles , get a sturdy container 

 

that's shy champaign bottle are thicker than regular wine

 

if you dont want bubbles , vent the container

 

simple

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/11/2020 at 4:44 PM, rotuts said:

A long time ago , my mother used to make a Finish drink called

 

Sima

 

https://www.thespruceeats.com/finnish-spring-mead-sima-2952646

 

I thought it was called Simi , but that didn't come up

 

we had it in Finland  and its easy to make

 

she used Safeway's brand BrowbDerby beer bottles , w a screw top

 

that's what my father drank.

 

its  a lightly fermented ted lemonade  , w a hint of raisins

 

to make ke it , you needed a tight container so  the COgenerated by the yeast

 

made it slightly bubbly .   

 

she made a case full at a time   ( Brown Derby 1 qt bottles )

 

it fermented in the pantry for s certain period at room temp

 

you chilled it in the refrigerator , the drank it

 

it was nice

 

then one day a bottle , in the evening , exploded in the pantry

 

no more Simi or Sima was made

 

fermentation releases CO2

 

thus champagne 

 

you want bubbles , get a sturdy container 

 

that's shy champaign bottle are thicker than regular wine

 

if you dont want bubbles , vent the container

 

simple

 

 

 

 


Thanks for the info @rotuts.
 

Anyways, it went in the fridge with lid ajar. Tonight I felt brave enough to try it. Slightly sour, but also sweet from the sugar and brandy.  We ate the oranges with a little pouring cream from the local dairy farmer.
Sorry I didn’t take a photo, but imagine a few orange segments with thin cream and there it is.

Hoping we don’t get sick and die tonight xx.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Drew777
      I'm a Brit. I'm also a closet Frenchman.  To cap it all, I'm happily retired in Bangkok, the city of a street food culture that's second to none. The Thais are healthy and slim. I'm just this side of alive and far from slim. Lockdown has me fantasizing about my days working in London, Paris and New York, an existence, if one could call it that, revolving around gastronomy of one kind or another. They paid me, not so very much as it happens, to do what I enjoy doing most in life. We all get to do it, but I was one of a fortunate few who made it his metier. Well all that's in the past now, but I still dream of my time in Paris when lunch was a tad short of 2-hours, little-known local bistros remained affordable until the day they were discovered by La Bible (Michelin Guide) and the students were revolting - this was the summer of '68, for heaven's sake. Someone should open bistro here in Bangkok with a table d'hote of Soupe a l'Oignon gratinee, Blanquette de Veau, a stinky Epoisses and Tarte Tatin to finsih with creme fraiche. Ah, it's back to lockdown and pad Thai. 
    • By scott123
      Here's where I'm at with baker's percents:
       
      150% Salted Butter
      58% Trader Joe's 72% Belgian Chocolate (I don't enjoy super chocolate-y brownies)
      240% Sugar
      100% All Purpose Flour
      91% Eggs
       
      Melt butter with chocolate (I take it to 170F). Mix in everything but eggs. In separate bowl, whisk eggs and then add eggs to everything else until just incorporated.
       
      Bake at 275F for 70 minutes
       
      My goal is Two Bite Brownies.  I'm looking for an end product that's chewy and a bit dry with a homogenous texture. I don't want any fudgyness- at all, and, right now, even with 70 minutes at 275, my end product has a super fudgy crumb and a crispy exterior.  I don't want a cakey texture either. This is the territory that I'm shooting for:
       
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKDujihI6Es&app=desktop
       
      These are not exactly Two Bites, but, if you look at the beginning, you'll see that the crumb is pretty dry.  The only major difference I'm seeing between their process and mine is that they add the flour last, while I add the egg last.  They don't show the flour being mixed in, but they do show the batter being dispensed into the baking pans and it definitely looks a bit thick- not cookie dough thick, but definitely not batter-y either.
       
      The goal is a brownie with more of a cookie texture, which might mean less eggs, but, before I take that direction, I wanted to see if anyone here had some thoughts on this.
    • By VTChef
      I have been working on buying an already existing diner and then Covid-19 hit and crippled the economy.  Now I'm having second thoughts on fulfilling this venture.  Is it still a good idea? Will I succeed? Do you all have any advice?
    • By Trufflenaut
      I need some advice on a safe(ish), easy, and fast way to cut buttermints   I often make buttermints for friends for the holidays, and have run into problems cutting them into bite size pieces before the sugar cools and starts to crystallize too much, so I'm looking for ideas on how to do it more quickly so I can do larger batches.  Note that I am doing this at home and have very little budget, but on the plus side I don't need to end up with perfectly uniform pieces.
       
      The basic process for making the buttermints is:
      1. cook butter and sugar to 260 degrees
      2. pour out onto buttered marble slab and let cool slightly
      3. add color and flavor, and pull like taffy while it cools further
      4. when it just starts to show signs of crystallizing, roll into ropes and cut before it crystallizes much further (I have maybe 2 minutes if I'm lucky to get all the cutting done)
       
      The main problem I run into is that when handling the candy during steps 3 and 4, my hands need to be buttered so the candy doesn't stick to me, and even if I quickly wash my hands, any cutting tool needs to also be buttered to prevent sticking, and basically it's nearly impossible to maintain a good grip on anything.  The second problem is that the candy at this point is hard enough that if I try to snip it with scissors it will tend to slide along the blade instead of getting cut, yet it is still plastic enough that if I pick it up it will tend to sag under its weight and thin out too much while I'm concentrating on getting the scissors to cut right.  My best results so far have been with leaving the candy on the marble and cutting it with a pastry scraper, but pressing down hard enough to cut all the way through with a slippery (due to the aforementioned buttered hands) pastry scraper while trying not to gouge the marble underneath is not particularly fun.  I did try pruning shears once because the curved blade holds the candy in place instead of sliding along the blade, which worked fine except for the fear of lopping off parts of a finger made it too nerve-wracking to be done quickly.
       
      Basically, I'd love to find something that works like this, but for something with the consistency of a hard caramel:
       
       
       
      Any ideas?
      -Trufflenaut
       
    • By jmacnaughtan
      Hi,
       
      This is a slightly odd question, and I think this is probably the right place for it.
       
      As I mentioned previously, I'm hosting a failed selfie exhibition and will be doing food and drink to match. One thing that I thought would be fun to do, however, was encase a functioning telephone in a set jelly/jell-O and have people call it.  It would be set on vibrate, obviously
       
      Anyway, this is not something I've done before, and the logistics are a bit interesting:
       
      - How can I stop the jelly destroying the electronics? Would a phone survive being vac-sealed?
      - Which proportion of gelatin to water do I need for structural stability, but maximum wobble?
      - Would a larger jelly wobble more satisfyingly?
      - Is a phone's vibrate setting even strong enough to wobble jelly?
      - Fully transparent or coloured?
       
      I don't intend to serve this as food, so food safety and flavour are not an issue.
       
      All suggestions welcome.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...