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JeanneCake

Chocolate Tempering Equipment for Casual or Beginning Hobbyists

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Posted (edited)

Host's note: this was split from the How to enrobe these marshmallows topic.

 

I need to get off the internet.  I just saw a video for a combination (?) Chocovision Revolation 3Z tempering/enrober/skimmer  - for which I am not buying, trust me.  I'm getting a 60 quart Hobart before I buy any (more) chocolate equipment (because I have an EZ temper, so @Jim D. the dark side has already started it's slow tease) and with what's going on in the world at the moment, I am in no position to spend $7k just because I'm obsessed with marshmallows. 

 

But wow, that is one cool machine. Sigh.


Edited by Smithy Adjusted title for clarity (log)
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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, JeanneCake said:

I need to get off the internet.  I just saw a video for a combination (?) Chocovision Revolation 3Z tempering/enrober/skimmer  - for which I am not buying, trust me.  I'm getting a 60 quart Hobart before I buy any (more) chocolate equipment (because I have an EZ temper, so @Jim D. the dark side has already started it's slow tease) and with what's going on in the world at the moment, I am in no position to spend $7k just because I'm obsessed with marshmallows. 

 

But wow, that is one cool machine. Sigh.

If it is the same one I’ve seen, don’t get it. You don’t need the tempering machine since you own an EZ temper and the enrobing belt that comes with the Rev is super tiny. When you need an enrober, some of the folks here can steer you to the good units. My vote is for the 60 quart Hobart.


Edited by curls fix spelling mistake (log)
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9 hours ago, curls said:

You don’t need the tempering machine since you own an EZ temper 

 

I am also an owner of an EZtemper, but I would just add that while it can be used to temper chocolate, it does not deal with the issue of what to do with having a large amount of chocolate ready for making shells or dipping centers. For that, of course, one needs (on a large scale) a full setup such as a Selmi or (on a smaller scale) a large bowl and some method of keeping the chocolate within a temp range or a melter or a tempering machine. The advantage to me of a Rev machine is that, unlike the other smaller-scale methods, it automates the maintaining of the temp through many hours of making shells or dipping.

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Valid point Jim D. I have several melters of  different capacities. They work great for having several kilos of chocolate ready for use. After using a 2 quart Pyrex measuring bowl and the seed method of tempering, I progressed to my first melter (still using the seed method). Melters are a lot cheaper than the Rev machines and I find it easier to empty chocolate moulds into a melter than a tempering unit like the Rev where you have to watch out for the machine parts that are dividing the bowl. A few melters and an EZ temper are my current setup — works great for me. Occasionally I yearn for an enrobing line but I’d need a lot more customers and wholesale accounts before that would make financial sense. I also think you get a better feel for each chocolates characteristics when you learn how to work with them without machinery.

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55 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

some method of keeping the chocolate within a temp range or a melter or a tempering machine.

 

You can buy 2 Paragon units and 2 big bowls. You keep one at 31°C for tempered chocolate, the other at 34°C for untempered dark chocolate to add when the first one goes low or overtempered. Much cheaper than melters, more versatile, easier to clean.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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@teonzo great idea to use Paragons instead of melters. Do you have any ideas for making inexpensive enrobing units?

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1 hour ago, teonzo said:

 

You can buy 2 Paragon units and 2 big bowls. You keep one at 31°C for tempered chocolate, the other at 34°C for untempered dark chocolate to add when the first one goes low or overtempered. Much cheaper than melters, more versatile, easier to clean.

 

Teo

 

 

Yes, but don't you have to pay some attention to the chocolate, such as stirring it from time to time so that it doesn't become overtempered too quickly and so that the temp is constant throughout the bowl?

 

And to @curls' point, indeed the round nature of the bowl is an issue. I have, through trial and error, found a method of dumping the contents of molds while holding them almost vertically over the bowl. Supposedly a chocolatier in western Canada was inventing something like the Rev machines but designed so that the whole bowl is available to be "dumped over." The real solution:  Someone needs to invent a tempering machine with a square bowl.  Sounds like a challenge for a "chocolate doctor"?

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18 minutes ago, curls said:

Do you have any ideas for making inexpensive enrobing units?

 

Oompa Loompas.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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22 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

 

Yes, but don't you have to pay some attention to the chocolate, such as stirring it from time to time so that it doesn't become overtempered too quickly and so that the temp is constant throughout the bowl?

 

And to @curls' point, indeed the round nature of the bowl is an issue. I have, through trial and error, found a method of dumping the contents of molds while holding them almost vertically over the bowl. Supposedly a chocolatier in western Canada was inventing something like the Rev machines but designed so that the whole bowl is available to be "dumped over." The real solution:  Someone needs to invent a tempering machine with a square bowl.  Sounds like a challenge for a "chocolate doctor"?

 

I don't have a Paragon unit, never seen one in real life, I just know about the existence from the threads here on eGullet. So there's the chance I understood it wrong.
From what I see there is the mat, you can lay whatever you want on it (even non induction compatible) and you get the precise temperature control. So you can use the mat plus whatever bowl / pan / else you want. You just need to buy something that is square / rectangular with the measures you need. There's plenty of choice out there, both plastic and steel. Most probably you can find square containers that are induction compatible too.
If you use 2 Paragon units and 2 bowls for each chocolate you use (and you have the EZtemper), then the only things you need to clean are the drippings outside the bowls. With the cost of a melter you buy 2 Paragons and all the bowls you need and end up saving a bit.
You still need to stir the chocolate, but that's going to happen with melters too. Working with the 2 bowls will ease the work with overtempered chocolate: just ladle some from the 34°C bowl, stir and done, it's a matter of 20 seconds, much quicker than using a heat gun, microwave or else.

 

 

 

Teo

 


Teo

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On 3/27/2020 at 4:29 PM, teonzo said:

 

I don't have a Paragon unit, never seen one in real life, I just know about the existence from the threads here on eGullet. So there's the chance I understood it wrong.
From what I see there is the mat, you can lay whatever you want on it (even non induction compatible) and you get the precise temperature control. So you can use the mat plus whatever bowl / pan / else you want. You just need to buy something that is square / rectangular with the measures you need. There's plenty of choice out there, both plastic and steel. Most probably you can find square containers that are induction compatible too.

 

Teo

 

 

@teonzo or others in Europe, do you happen to have ideas of where to find precision induction cooktops similar to the Paragon? I can find it from Amazon.com but it doesn't offer shipping to Finland at least. There's the Polyscience / Breville cooktop, but that was something like 3000 euros so obviously not great for acting as a melter. I can get for example a Martellato or Mol D'Art 6 litre melter for around 400€ shipped, but wondering if there are smarter solutions as Teo thought with the Paragon.

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While I think it would be great to have a melter, for hobby chocolates, it's more than I need.


 I use a set up with a sous vide circulator that takes the place of the holding function of the melter.  The set up consists of a medium sized plastic dishpan filled with water.  My husband made a custom lexan cover for the dishpan.  It's cut so that the handles of the dishpan keep the lexan from moving around too much.  I use a Corelle French White bowl to hold the chocolate.  The hole cut in the lexan holds the bowl closely so that there is little chance of water vapor getting in the chocolate.  There is also a cut out for the immersion circulator to fit  The 2.5 quart round bowl holds about 3 pounds of chocolate. The 4 quart oval dish holds about 5 - 6 pounds of chocolate.  

 

The 4 quart oval dish works really well for when I am using molds.  The molds can be emptied easily over the oval shape.

 

I usually melt the chocolate in the microwave and temper it using silk, then hold it at temperature using the sous vide bath.  I could also use another set up to hold more chocolate at temperature for replenishment.  

 

IMG_0513.thumb.jpeg.5a73b97fd711999081773a0807a8e92e.jpeg

 

 

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7 hours ago, GRiker said:

While I think it would be great to have a melter, for hobby chocolates, it's more than I need.


 I use a set up with a sous vide circulator that takes the place of the holding function of the melter.  The set up consists of a medium sized plastic dishpan filled with water.  My husband made a custom lexan cover for the dishpan.  It's cut so that the handles of the dishpan keep the lexan from moving around too much.  I use a Corelle French White bowl to hold the chocolate.  The hole cut in the lexan holds the bowl closely so that there is little chance of water vapor getting in the chocolate.  There is also a cut out for the immersion circulator to fit  The 2.5 quart round bowl holds about 3 pounds of chocolate. The 4 quart oval dish holds about 5 - 6 pounds of chocolate.  

 

The 4 quart oval dish works really well for when I am using molds.  The molds can be emptied easily over the oval shape.

 

I usually melt the chocolate in the microwave and temper it using silk, then hold it at temperature using the sous vide bath.  I could also use another set up to hold more chocolate at temperature for replenishment.  

 

IMG_0513.thumb.jpeg.5a73b97fd711999081773a0807a8e92e.jpeg

 

 


this is also what I do when I do chocolate work (which, for the moment, is still pretty rare, but I hope to change that). 

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On 3/27/2020 at 10:05 AM, Jim D. said:

 

Yes, but don't you have to pay some attention to the chocolate, such as stirring it from time to time so that it doesn't become overtempered too quickly and so that the temp is constant throughout the bowl?

 

And to @curls' point, indeed the round nature of the bowl is an issue. I have, through trial and error, found a method of dumping the contents of molds while holding them almost vertically over the bowl. Supposedly a chocolatier in western Canada was inventing something like the Rev machines but designed so that the whole bowl is available to be "dumped over." The real solution:  Someone needs to invent a tempering machine with a square bowl.  Sounds like a challenge for a "chocolate doctor"?

I like the 3 kg melters that we have discussed elsewhere that have a rectangular bowl - much better for the dump. Although I dump over a round bowl with no difficultly I must confess. 

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Posted (edited)
On ‎3‎/‎27‎/‎2020 at 8:44 AM, teonzo said:

 

You can buy 2 Paragon units and 2 big bowls. You keep one at 31°C for tempered chocolate, the other at 34°C for untempered dark chocolate to add when the first one goes low or overtempered. Much cheaper than melters, more versatile, easier to clean.

 

 

 

Teo

 

 

Don't forget the KitchenAid Precise Heat Mixing Bowl!  (For which I blame Kerry.)

 

Edit:  I have not tried it but I'm not sure the Paragon would be precise enough for chocolate.  Might work though.

 


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)
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14 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Don't forget the KitchenAid Precise Heat Mixing Bowl!  (For which I blame Kerry.)

 

Edit:  I have not tried it but I'm not sure the Paragon would be precise enough for chocolate.  Might work though.

 

 

@patris and I played with it for tempering if I recall correctly - it worked fine. I may be confusing it with the Control Freak though.

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HI,

Thanks for all the insights - Please, what is your suggestion fo a melter:

 

1. Mol d'art - 6 kg  

+: clean bonbon molds into the tank directly - good rep machine

-: don't plan now to do production but whatever I get I want to just be surte it can be reused when I decide to do. It seeam I would have to melt at least 4 kg....

 

2. Martellato:

+: just came out with a 3 kg rectangular tank which wouyld solve the issue of melting too much choc - digital machine:

https://www.bakedeco.com/detail.asp?id=54729&trng=fgle&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIz9ue3MTX6QIVxsDICh10YQpQEAQYBiABEgJGkvD_BwE

-: not such a good name as mol d'art.

 

3. Kitchenaid precise heat mixing bowl - 

+: seems that it would keep chocolate tempered with movement

-: harder to dump the choc after making the bonbon shells

 

Thanks!

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@drbrenner please tell us a little bit more about your chocolate making plans. How much experience do you have? How many chocolates would you like to make in a day? What sort of chocolate will you be using (dark, milk, white)? Are you hand dipping, molding, enrobing? The more details you can provide the better chance that someone can provide some helpful suggestions.

 

If your just starting out I don’t think you need any of the suggested options... just a bowl and a microwave or melted chocolate and a slab of marble. Please let us know more about what you do and what you want to do with chocolate.

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Hi,

Medium experience - not for enrobing but for molded bonbons - I have been doing MW & bowl and tempering w/Mycryo.

Need to maintain a tempered state.

 

Thx

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1 hour ago, drbrenner said:

Hi,

Medium experience - not for enrobing but for molded bonbons - I have been doing MW & bowl and tempering w/Mycryo.

Need to maintain a tempered state.

 

Thx

Then I would recommend the 6 kg mol d’art or the Bakon MTD 123 mini. If you can find then in the used market, even better.

https://www.heritageparts.com/medias/BKN0007.pdf?context=bWFzdGVyfHBkZi1tYW51YWxzfDUyNTYzNnxhcHBsaWNhdGlvbi9wZGZ8cGRmLW1hbnVhbHMvaGQyL2gwZS84OTUwNDkyMzY0ODMwLnBkZnxkZGY5N2Q2NDA2Y2I3Y2U4Zjg0NjA4OWU0MGE4ODdjY2FmODAxYzU1YzgyYWM3Y2E5YjJlMzMxZjczNTYwN2M2
 

Hopefully a few more folks will chime in. Have fun with your chocolate making!

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