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Sourdough Discard recipes, bakes, and cooks


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Couldn't find a topic devoted to sourdough discard cooking, so thought I would start one and see how much interest it would generate. Moderators, if there is a topic, please merge.

 

Recently I have begun making sourdough bread and am caring for a sourdough starter. Since there is currently some difficulty finding flour (due to COVID-19 related supply chain issues, etc.) I don't want to throw out any of my sourdough starter. I am also following guidance from King Arthur Flour and Cooks Illustrated for working with a small sourdough starter (10 g. flour | 10 g. water | 10 g. sourdough starter) and using recipes that use smaller amounts of sourdough starter or only building my starter up if called for by a recipe.

 

I have made the following recipes and would make them again:

- King Arthur Flour sourdough discard crumpets. https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/sourdough-crumpets-recipe

- King Arthur Flour sourdough discard waffles. I used a mix of yogurt & milk instead of buttermilk but otherwise made the recipe as written.  https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/classic-sourdough-waffles-or-pancakes-recipe

 

1877670054_IMG_5993-crumpetscooking.jpg.20dd773b964ebef9ac8cfbd14f441e2f.jpg

 

780366659_IMG_6040-sourdoughdiscardwaffles.jpg.b91c03ae5da0c62bf65e85d4f4b1722e.jpg

 

What are you doing with your sourdough discard?

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I made a sweet vanilla biscuit last night--did not really use a recipe, just winged it. Basically a sourdough biscuit with vanilla and a little sugar added. They were quite tasty. 

 

I also made these cookies. With the cinnamon sugar on them, they are like snickerdoodles. They were delicious. 

Sourdough Snickerdoodles

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Deb

Liberty, MO

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I have made the King Arthur Flour recipes for crumpets and waffles, both of which we liked.  I also made their cracker recipe

 

crackers.thumb.jpg.b97aa9a52681a75583d8236f5cf1df43.jpg

 

One recipe that we did not really like was their recipe for sourdough discard pizza dough. We all felt that the crust was too chewy.  I posted a picture of that pizza in the Dinner! thread.

 

My first loaf of sourdough bread is in the oven as we speak.  It's not for my house, it is going to my parents.  I have a loaf of pan de mie baking in the other oven for my house.

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I’m craving savory scones for breakfast these days.

i made the KAF recipe for Bacon, Cheddar and Chive Scones which are really good...but next time I’ll reduce the salt a bit; between the cheese and the bacon, they don’t need very much added salt.

Today I’ll make their Cheddar and Scallion Scones.  I’ve made these before and they’re a favorite of mine.

 

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I just started my first sourdough "starter" this weekend.   I got some local whole wheat flour to start, and now am feeding it half wheat and half AP and will ween it off to all AP in a day or two.  

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Why not dry the starter until you have the flour to make more bread. See this youtube video

 

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"Flay your Suffolk bought-this-morning sole with organic hand-cracked pepper and blasted salt. Thrill each side for four minutes at torchmark haut. Interrogate a lemon. Embarrass any tough roots from the samphire. Then bamboozle till it's al dente with that certain je ne sais quoi."

Arabella Weir as Minty Marchmont - Posh Nosh

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Sourdough discard plus a bit of yeast. One sandwich loaf and one with a cinnamon sugar swirl (I plan to use more cinnamon sugar next time).

 

1123692010_IMG_6795-BuzzbyBakes-sandwichandcinnamonloaves.jpg.6b9a9eeeaa6eb94af40aee2fafcfd72e.jpg

 

1186640098_IMG_6804-BuzzbyBakes-cinnamonswirlloaf.jpg.33a78aca16a54079cc432c1ed5091690.jpg

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