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Purchased! - Potential BlueStar Range Purchase


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The Airsled looks cool,  but I just used the plastic furniture slider they sell at hardware stors. Used a crowbar and a piece of wood to lift up each leg and put one on each, then had no problem moving it in and out on the  floor. If you had to go up or down, that may be harder.   

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I'll be needing to move it a few feet over cardboard covered hardwood floors (recently refinished) then 5 feet of Armstrong Exelon. For the $20 rental fee, and probably needing to pull and put it in at least once to get the leveling correct that AirSled looks like a better idea. 

That and not trying to explain floor scratches to my wife.

But thanks for the recommendation.

BTW, the electric company showed up 30 hours after the incident. Went as far as saying the problem was internal to my home. When I challenged that assumption, asking how power could spike within a home without an external cause he backed down. This looks like a long ride.

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No problem,  that is a pretty inexpensive rental, let us know how it works out .  BTW,  if your gas guy has not come out, there is not much space in the rear wall of the oven to allow you  to mount the pipe in that wall and not hit the range, so many have come up through the floor, and installed the cutoff right at the floor, then attached the flex pipe and snaked that into the channel when you push the range back into position.  That is what I did and it worked fine.   

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47 minutes ago, Barrytm said:

there is not much space in the rear wall of the oven 

 

Yeah, both the electrician and the gasfitter will need to modify their recent work. I blame myself for that though, not enough research.

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On 8/10/2020 at 7:45 PM, CentralMA said:

 

Yeah, both the electrician and the gasfitter will need to modify their recent work. I blame myself for that though, not enough research.

I heartily recommend an ox box gas valve box, like https://smile.amazon.com/Sioux-Chief-696-1031GF-Box-Outlet/dp/B003QSPUJO/

I installed one for my range, which greatly simplified installation, and got rid of the pipe coming through the floor.

 

VZAZ8Zs.jpg

Plaster was the next step...

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On 8/12/2020 at 11:03 AM, dscheidt said:

I heartily recommend an ox box gas valve box

 

Had I known about something like that it would have been a good solution to the current situation. But at this point I'm tired of cutting into walls and the resulting debris. Moving the wall outlets to a work box will cause little disruption.

 

Vent has been run, complete. Out the side of the house. Still planning on fabricating some type of guard out of 1/4' steel mesh, keep the birds from nesting.

 

Here's pics of the current problem, Looking at the range pic, the recess you see has just 1 3/4" allowance 3" off the floor. It does gain space, to accommodate the gas piping. The pipe you see in the other pic will need to be moved back about 3/4", not hard to do, there's enough play without stressing the installation.

And in that same pic you can see the type of outlet we're going to install, removing the quad install in the wall and relocating the wiring to the workbox.

 

In other news, the electrician has stated he'll be here the 20th at 8:00AM. My wife won't make the move to this house until there's a place to cook. Now to decide if I can take the promise of the 20th as a fact, and schedule the gas fitter and most importantly the rental of the AirSled, try to coordinate everything soon after. 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_20200812_134355878.jpg

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On 8/6/2020 at 2:18 PM, mumkin said:

Here’s a BlueStar thing I haven’t seen mentioned elsewhere: they make a set of gauges for setting the aperture of your air shutters (as seen in this video), but they don’t come with the unit, nor are they sold via BlueStar’s website. I asked my dealer if he had a set I could borrow and he had BlueStar send one to me gratis. With them I was able to confirm that my shutters were at factory spec, but perhaps more importantly, if I should ever decide to try tweaking them, I’ll be able to return them to spec if need be. 

 

 

I decided to look into this. First called the appliance store, they had never heard of these, nor have ever needed them. And called me a little crazy for thinking I may actually need them.

So then I called BlueStar direct. The customer service rep stated there was no such thing. I pushed that URL you noted to them, stating that is was in fact BlueStar produced. Put on hold, 5 minutes later the rep acknowledged that they do indeed exist. Part # SVR-AIRSHUTKIT-NAT. About $130.00 for the set. When I questioned that cost for 5 or 6 medallions the size of a half dollar, and that I was going to be doing the install myself (ooops....should I have said that? Immediately I was told that would void any warranty. I asked, are you sure of that? She digressed after talking amongst others in her area, self installs do not void warranty) and I wanted to be sure what was set at the factory was indeed correct. She then offered 25% reduction in cost.  So I'll pass. 

I was also pleased to learn from the rep that that amount of gas consumed is regulated by the air shutter configuration. At that point I just gave up.

 

Got the free broiler pan after inadvertantly finding a page on their website that was offering free pan and shipping for new owners. Had no idea this was in place for new purchases, was not informed by the appliance dealer. Showed up a few days later. 15" x 13", about 3lbs. I was expecting something larger, maybe due to the "full size sheet pan" selling point of the oven. But it's nice enough.

 

And haven't seen the replacement knobs as yet.

 

 

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I hear your angst.   And I certainly understand your bride's love for and pride in her new kitchen floor, but everyone should take a deep breath. 

I have had many new appliances and several new floors.    Most have been scratched or dented or otherwise maimed, often in their infancy and more often by a beloved family member.

At some point you realize that you can replace or conceal a blemished floor or appliance easier than you can a beloved family member or longtime friend.

eGullet member #80.

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Here's pics of the current problem, Looking at the range pic, the recess you see has just 1 3/4" allowance 3" off the floor. It does gain space, to accommodate the gas piping. The pipe you see in the other pic will need to be moved back about 3/4", not hard to do, there's enough play without stressing the installation.

 

You can move the pipe back,  though you will have to hit a fairly tight spot where the channel is,  or you can have the plumber put the shutoff closer to the floor, that way the flex hose goes under the range towards the wall and then snakes back up in the channel in the first photo.  

 

 

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On 8/14/2020 at 12:25 PM, CentralMA said:

Part # SVR-AIRSHUTKIT-NAT. About $130.00 for the set.

 

Good heavens! I've yet to have to deal with BlueStar directly, but am appreciating my appliance dealer all the more for that!

 

Haven't seen recommended air shutter opening measurements posted anywhere, though that seems like it should be out there. Maybe I'll rustle-up a set of digital calipers and measure these very expensive plugs of laser-etched galvanized steel.

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14 hours ago, mumkin said:

 

Good heavens! I've yet to have to deal with BlueStar directly, but am appreciating my appliance dealer all the more for that!

 

Likewise. My dealer has been perfect.

And hearing the problems that people have with HomeDepotLowe'sTarget service on appliances makes me love them all the more

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When I bought my Wolf range (and all the other appliances from a well-liked dealer in Newark, NJ), I got the classic set of knobs.  Then I read somewhere that they (Wolf) also offer another set of knobs (that needed to be asked for) for free - I think stainless. So I wrote the dealer, and they were ordered and delivered toot sweet. But yeah - without me finding out about them, I would've never known.

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On 8/14/2020 at 1:49 PM, CentralMA said:

 

Had I known about something like that it would have been a good solution to the current situation. But at this point I'm tired of cutting into walls and the resulting debris. Moving the wall outlets to a work box will cause little disruption.

 

I figured it was too late for you, but I figured it could help someone in the future.  No one seems to know about these boxes. They're not stocked by big box stores.  Mine cam,e from a plumbing supply place, which had it in stock, but the counter guys had no idea they existed.  (I called to check stock, guy asked what it was after saying thye had one.  Guy who sold it to me also commented about never having seen one.)   If you know what  stove is going in, they're a great solution. 

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On 8/14/2020 at 6:52 PM, Margaret Pilgrim said:

I hear your angst.   And I certainly understand your bride's love for and pride in her new kitchen floor, but everyone should take a deep breath. 

I have had many new appliances and several new floors.    Most have been scratched or dented or otherwise maimed, often in their infancy and more often by a beloved family member.

At some point you realize that you can replace or conceal a blemished floor or appliance easier than you can a beloved family member or longtime friend.

 

I sense there's a short story here worth reading. 

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It definitely helps to have a good appliance shop. When I got my Wolf oven they asked me which knobs I wanted (red or stainless) and I used their Wolf installer. Prior to delivery they worked with my general contractor to make sure the range would fit between the cabinets, line up with the countertop, and that the gas hookup was in the right location. On installation day, everything went perfectly and they gave me both sets of knobs and some stainless steel cleaner. I never want to do another kitchen renovation but this one went extremely well. It’s been about seven years and I still love my kitchen. 

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FWIW, and truly empathizing with your adventure, husband is an engineer, and like all engineers he is sure his way is best.    He has installed all of our appliances, usually after many hours of reading off and online manuals, taking miles of measurements, ordering or making dozens of unmarketed adapters, removing interior doors to access the kitchen, knobs and oven door handles to decrease depths..   

 

I read him your floor concerns and he immediately recommended some sort of carpeted triwall useful for gliding behemoths across finished areas.    I told him you were going with an air-lift system.    He nodded, "That works."

 

Our most amusing installation was a tower refrigerator at our country place.    We bought locally from the nearest small town appliance store.   it was delivered by two guys in the store truck.    One guy got in the back of the truck and i could see that the refrigerator was a lot shorter than he.    The refrigerator was about 6ft.   I took a deep breath and told myself that it was NOT MY PROBLEM.   That eventually we would have the right model.    Then they moved the refrigerator off the truck and as if by magic it was right.    After it was happily installed in our kitchen, I asked the kid, "I'm sure that you're tired of this question, but how tall are you?"    "Six foot 9".      Riiiiiiight.

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12 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

 After it was happily installed in our kitchen, I asked the kid, "I'm sure that you're tired of this question, but how tall are you?"    "Six foot 9".      Riiiiiiight.

 

Back when I had my restaurant at the seaside hotel, we'd open for the season on Mother's Day. We had a young gent and his mom come out in May of 2009...he was a solid 6' 3" but sturdy enough to not look especially tall from a distance. Had that "tradesman" look about him, with close-cropped hair and a sandy beard and mustache. My (now-) late wife was serving that day, and told me "He's a ringer for my older stepson."

As we were chatting with them over dessert and coffee, she told him "I'm sorry if I keep looking at you oddly, but you look SO much like my oldest son...except a foot shorter."

His face was a study...

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  • 3 weeks later...

It's been a long road...

 

Plumber was here this morning to finish up the install.

 

I was at the tool rental shop 8AM sharp to pick up the AirSled, back at the house by 8:45. Plumber was waiting for me at the house. He had told me 10AM, I had to scramble to get the needed height spacer blocks ready (AirSled stuff).  

 

Minor modifications to the initial gas install (and a little more after he left, but just to make some extra space through the floor so the gas line could move closer to the wall, not a lot of room behind these ranges), then plugged it in, purged the line, fired it up. It's lovely. More lovely than I thought it would be. 

 

My wife, who I do love dearly, and who has been holding the idea of my purchase of a $5K range over my head for the past months, also seemed pleased. Have I told you about the window treatments she picked out? Through a good friend in that business, 4 roller shades, chain operated, not big windows, not quite $800, his cost/our cost. I think I've gained the upper hand on this one. Ya can't cook on shades....

 

Pics when I get the cabinets back in, the place cleaned up. But it's nice...really nice. And hot. Wicked hot. Which reminds me to purchase a couple of kitchen use fire extinguishers before the inspector arrives on Tuesday. Inspectors like fire extinguishers. 

 

And the AirSled. Marvelous piece of kit, but the rental unit was a tortured mess. Lots of duct tape repairs existing, I needed to add more than a few inches of Gorilla tape to patch the air leaks. Once I got it fairly airtight it was easy to use, lifted the 200+lbs with ease using the supplied vac the size of a small watermelon. My plumber expressed interest in purchasing one for his company use, I think he was seeing the $$$ available to be made without bringing in high cost labor for heavy appliance moves. I had the AirSled back to the rental company by noon, 40 minutes away. And just $20. Well worth it.

 

So far, life is good.

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