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Here's where I'm at with baker's percents:

 

150% Salted Butter
58% Trader Joe's 72% Belgian Chocolate (I don't enjoy super chocolate-y brownies)
240% Sugar
100% All Purpose Flour
91% Eggs

 

Melt butter with chocolate (I take it to 170F). Mix in everything but eggs. In separate bowl, whisk eggs and then add eggs to everything else until just incorporated.

 

Bake at 275F for 70 minutes

 

My goal is Two Bite Brownies.  I'm looking for an end product that's chewy and a bit dry with a homogenous texture. I don't want any fudgyness- at all, and, right now, even with 70 minutes at 275, my end product has a super fudgy crumb and a crispy exterior.  I don't want a cakey texture either. This is the territory that I'm shooting for:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKDujihI6Es&app=desktop

 

These are not exactly Two Bites, but, if you look at the beginning, you'll see that the crumb is pretty dry.  The only major difference I'm seeing between their process and mine is that they add the flour last, while I add the egg last.  They don't show the flour being mixed in, but they do show the batter being dispensed into the baking pans and it definitely looks a bit thick- not cookie dough thick, but definitely not batter-y either.

 

The goal is a brownie with more of a cookie texture, which might mean less eggs, but, before I take that direction, I wanted to see if anyone here had some thoughts on this.

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4 hours ago, scott123 said:

My Brownies Are Too Fudgy


Never mind... I thought this was going to be a thread on food things that are impossible. :P

Seriously though, my first thought would be to reduce the fat ratio.

  • Haha 1

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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that was an interesting video...before they showed what the product was, I was thinking it was a chocolate financier.   Your recipe is going to make a fudgy brownie; I think you need some cocoa powder in there.  I lost track but I thought I saw liquid butter (at the start), then sugar, cocoa, shortening, liquid eggs - and molasses maybe? so if you're open to a different formula, maybe go with a chocolate financier?

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