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Buying online fish/frozen fish, shellfish


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On 7/2/2021 at 7:16 PM, KennethT said:

Now I feel like I should've held out longer when considering joining!

Same here, I think once you join that's the end of bonus items - try a second (or third) email 😈

 

p

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I placed my order with Wild Fork on Thursday afternoon, and my box arrived on Friday - shipped ground from Allentown, PA. The box was a large styrofoam cooler with dry ice which fit exactly into a brown corrugated cardboard box.  There was still plenty of dry ice even at like 7PM Friday evening.  So far, everything looks great but they left out one item.  I emailed them about it (at 7:30PM on Friday), and they emailed me back a few hours later saying that they refunded the cost of the item as well as my shipping cost.

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45 minutes ago, KennethT said:

 they refunded the cost of the item as well as my shipping cost.

That sounds fair especially with the free shipping 😇

 

p

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Tonight I cooked the Spotted Prawns included with my first Wild Alaskan order. First, I had to prep them. They came with shells and tails, but no head. I allowed them to thaw in the sink - that is, I moved them from the counter into the sink when I realized the bags were oozing red liquid.

 

First thoughts: I will never again confuse prawns with shrimp. These were HUGE and the shape is different: fatter body for the length of the animal, at least until it was out of its shell. See the left-hand picture below. Note also the considerably larger appendages. 

 

Second: of the roughly dozen prawns that I cleaned, only 3 did not have roe. I wonder whether it's normal to have so many females in a haul? Does their presence mean that the harvest came too soon? I don't know whether female prawns always carry roe.

 

Third: the roe was essentially on the outside (underside) of the exoskeleton. I tried getting at it from the inside, after removing the flesh. It was protected from the inside by a fairly clear but tough membrane. On the outside, it seemed to be protected mostly by those appendages with which the creature swims.

 

20210718_223605.jpg

 

I persevered, and then used them in a dish called "Confetti Shrimp" from the delightful 1994 cookbook, Feast of Eden: Recipes from California's Garden Paradise (eG-friendly Amazon.com link). Hey, it's a Junior League (of Monterey County) cookbook. Of course it's good.

 

The recipe was delicious and the prawns delectable. In my experience, packaged frozen shrimp often have, well, a fishy or shrimpy smell. These didn't. The meat tasted and smelled delicate and fresh, and the texture was perfect. I've posted more about the dish itself in the Dinner topic, but wanted to report back here on the prawns. I wonder if they have any more?

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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8 hours ago, Smithy said:

Tonight I cooked the Spotted Prawns included with my first Wild Alaskan order. First, I had to prep them. They came with shells and tails, but no head. I allowed them to thaw in the sink - that is, I moved them from the counter into the sink when I realized the bags were oozing red liquid.

 

First thoughts: I will never again confuse prawns with shrimp. These were HUGE and the shape is different: fatter body for the length of the animal, at least until it was out of its shell. See the left-hand picture below. Note also the considerably larger appendages. 

 

Second: of the roughly dozen prawns that I cleaned, only 3 did not have roe. I wonder whether it's normal to have so many females in a haul? Does their presence mean that the harvest came too soon? I don't know whether female prawns always carry roe.

 

Third: the roe was essentially on the outside (underside) of the exoskeleton. I tried getting at it from the inside, after removing the flesh. It was protected from the inside by a fairly clear but tough membrane. On the outside, it seemed to be protected mostly by those appendages with which the creature swims.

 

20210718_223605.jpg

 

I persevered, and then used them in a dish called "Confetti Shrimp" from the delightful 1994 cookbook, Feast of Eden: Recipes from California's Garden Paradise (eG-friendly Amazon.com link). Hey, it's a Junior League (of Monterey County) cookbook. Of course it's good.

 

The recipe was delicious and the prawns delectable. In my experience, packaged frozen shrimp often have, well, a fishy or shrimpy smell. These didn't. The meat tasted and smelled delicate and fresh, and the texture was perfect. I've posted more about the dish itself in the Dinner topic, but wanted to report back here on the prawns. I wonder if they have any more?

They definitely have more - I'll be getting 2 bags in my next box which ships in the next day or two.

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On 7/17/2021 at 8:52 AM, KennethT said:

I placed my order with Wild Fork on Thursday afternoon, and my box arrived on Friday - shipped ground from Allentown, PA. The box was a large styrofoam cooler with dry ice which fit exactly into a brown corrugated cardboard box.  There was still plenty of dry ice even at like 7PM Friday evening.  So far, everything looks great but they left out one item.  I emailed them about it (at 7:30PM on Friday), and they emailed me back a few hours later saying that they refunded the cost of the item as well as my shipping cost.

Just a slight edit - while their email to me said they'd refund the missing item and the ground shipping, the refund only had the missing item - no shipping... oh well.  I'd still use them again.

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2 hours ago, KennethT said:

They definitely have more - I'll be getting 2 bags in my next box which ships in the next day or two.

 

I couldn't find them on the web site, but I'm chatting with a rep and have just added the prawns to my order. Thanks, Kenneth!

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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11 hours ago, Smithy said:

Second: of the roughly dozen prawns that I cleaned, only 3 did not have roe. I wonder whether it's normal to have so many females in a haul? Does their presence mean that the harvest came too soon? I don't know whether female prawns always carry roe.

 

Third: the roe was essentially on the outside (underside) of the exoskeleton. I tried getting at it from the inside, after removing the flesh. It was protected from the inside by a fairly clear but tough membrane. On the outside, it seemed to be protected mostly by those appendages with which the creature swims.

 

The ones I used to buy in Morro Bay live from tanks almost always had roe. Between Memorial Day & Labor Day (US) so seems in the window. And yours were frozen so harvest date unknown I imagine.

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1 hour ago, rotuts said:

is the roe tasty ?

 

do you ear it raw ?

 

I know the "green gunk" in lobsters, their roe, is tasty. I don't know about eating any of it raw and I forgot to ask during my chat this morning. I included it in the pasta dish and it may have added something, but can't say with any certainty. 

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Thanks everybody for your comments

 

looks to me , this Fall , on the later side

 

Im going to try this.

 

why wait ?

 

to hot and too wet to humid here

 

for such delicacies 

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1 hour ago, Smithy said:

 

I know the "green gunk" in lobsters, their roe, is tasty. I don't know about eating any of it raw and I forgot to ask during my chat this morning. I included it in the pasta dish and it may have added something, but can't say with any certainty. 

I always understood that green stuff to be the lobsters equivalent of a liver and I know there have been warnings that because it filters out various poisons it is not wise to eat it anymore. I’m prepared to be shot down by anyone!

I thought lobster roe was pink. 

 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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1 hour ago, Smithy said:

 

I know the "green gunk" in lobsters, their roe, is tasty. I don't know about eating any of it raw and I forgot to ask during my chat this morning. I included it in the pasta dish and it may have added something, but can't say with any certainty. 

 

I thought the "green gunk" was tomalley, digestive gland(s), supposedly a combo of liver and pancreas.

 

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37 minutes ago, Anna N said:

I always understood that green stuff to be the lobsters equivalent of a liver and I know there have been warnings that because it filters out various poisons it is not wise to eat it anymore. I’m prepared to be shot down by anyone!

I thought lobster roe was pink. 

 

Correct on both counts, though it's too vivid to be fairly called pink. The usual term for lobster roe is "coral," which expresses the color more accurately.

 

I do eat the tomalley, but sparingly, for the reasons stated. I'll eat the coral every time, and get the opportunity to do so periodically because my GF loves lobster. Myself, I can take it or leave it but usually leave it, except for the coral. That I love.

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7 hours ago, Anna N said:

I always understood that green stuff to be the lobsters equivalent of a liver and I know there have been warnings that because it filters out various poisons it is not wise to eat it anymore. I’m prepared to be shot down by anyone!

I thought lobster roe was pink. 

 

 

7 hours ago, MokaPot said:

 

I thought the "green gunk" was tomalley, digestive gland(s), supposedly a combo of liver and pancreas.

 

 

6 hours ago, chromedome said:

Correct on both counts, though it's too vivid to be fairly called pink. The usual term for lobster roe is "coral," which expresses the color more accurately.

 

I do eat the tomalley, but sparingly, for the reasons stated. I'll eat the coral every time, and get the opportunity to do so periodically because my GF loves lobster. Myself, I can take it or leave it but usually leave it, except for the coral. That I love.

 

I sit humbly corrected, and apologize for posting misinformation. I wondered, as I was posting, why lobster roe would be such a different color than shrimp or fish roe. I should have checked my recollection. 🙂 

 

Thank you all! 

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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  • 3 weeks later...

I recently received a second box from Wild Fork... more chicken thighs (we go through a lot of thighs), a rack of pork spare ribs for $2 a pound or something ridiculously cheap like that (I'm using them to make stock) along with a couple of pork hocks, also for the stock. 

 

I also ordered 1.5 pounds of grouper, of which we had some last night.  It was devoured faster than we could take a photo - I made a Thai pad cha grouper stir fry.  This may be my new favorite fish for this type of application, and the quality was fantastic.

 

On the fish note, I have a glut of wild Alaskan salmon - both sockeye and coho.  To be honest, I really don't know what to do with them.  I'm used to dealing with the fatty, almost unctuous farmed Alaskan salmon.  But the first portions I made of the sockeye were underwhelming.   They were dry. Really dry.  And I don't think I overcooked them - definitely not enough for them to be as dry as they were.  Any recommendations of what to do with them so that we'll actually enjoy eating them?

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24 minutes ago, KennethT said:

IOn the fish note, I have a glut of wild Alaskan salmon - both sockeye and coho.  To be honest, I really don't know what to do with them.  I'm used to dealing with the fatty, almost unctuous farmed Alaskan salmon.  But the first portions I made of the sockeye were underwhelming.   They were dry. Really dry.  And I don't think I overcooked them - definitely not enough for them to be as dry as they were.  Any recommendations of what to do with them so that we'll actually enjoy eating them?

The wild Alaskan I used to get from my fisher buddy we liked very plainly baked with a thin gaze like miso or sharp mustard + orange and some crushed garlic . Just simple strong flavor. Barely cooked. I prefer to do the skin separately to crisp. Also like it chunked in a coconut forward broth with SE Asian flavors (rice or rice noodles along). Again the fish at the end so just barely cooked through. I want to taste the hard work of that brave swimmer salmon. 

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I've been having problems with overcooking the salmon also. My husband thinks salmon is always dry(!) anyway, and my efforts have done nothing to change his mind.  So far I've tried frying it - not my favorite, but his favorite treatment for fish - and baking it with a pecan crust. I'll try @heidih's method next time, or else try poaching the salmon in olive oil or butter.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I think I've mentioned the wild Alaskan salmon dryness problem before.  The way I deal with it and keeping it somewhat moist is very low heat cooking - I don't think you have a CSO, @KennethT, but in that oven, I cook it on steam at the lowest possible temperature for a very short time...they're pretty thin pieces.

 

I've also smoked it to good effect in a gin donabe.

 

And finally, try poaching it. I had good luck with that. Don't boil; just barely simmer.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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6 minutes ago, Smithy said:

I've been having problems with overcooking the salmon also. My husband thinks salmon is always dry(!) anyway, and my efforts have done nothing to change his mind.  So far I've tried frying it - not my favorite, but his favorite treatment for fish - and baking it with a pecan crust. I'll try @heidih's method next time, or else try poaching the salmon in olive oil or butter.

I know many will consider my dissing of salmon as sacrilege, but after years of having abundant sockeye and coho, thanks to a fishing-for-fun husband, I have finally accepted that I don't really like salmon any way other than cold smoked. Now that, I love. I just don't think it is one of the best fish out there and even when barely cooked to a safe temperture, I still find it dry and "fishy." Halibut, ling cod, sablefish - I could eat several times a week. I have made a salmon/corn chowder when corn is fresh and abundant and we like that. Now salmon goes in the smoker, either traditionally smoked or cold smoked. And horror of horrors, I have been known to can both sockeye and coho, as we do enjoy a salmon sandwich now and again and my 94 year old dad thinks that a plate of sliced garden tomatoes topped with a can of sockeye is a meal straight from heaven so I am happy to oblige. I will probably have my coastal BC residency revoked after this post...

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6 minutes ago, MaryIsobel said:

And horror of horrors, I have been known to can both sockeye and coho, as we do enjoy a salmon sandwich now and again and my 94 year old dad thinks that a plate of sliced garden tomatoes topped with a can of sockeye is a meal straight from heaven so I am happy to oblige.

 

More about canning the salmon, please. I probably won't get to it, but I'd like to know more in case I want to try it.

 

I also wonder about potting the salmon. I like potted shrimp, why not potted salmon? That could be done without the high pressure I suspect canning the salmon would require.

 

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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6 minutes ago, KennethT said:

@Smithy and @weinoo Yes I have a CSO and I've steamed whole fish in it really well - it's an idea. I could always treat it like I treated the farmed stuff and SV it to a core of 102F

Oh yeah - try it in there.  I actually like to salt it a couple of hours ahead.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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49 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

More about canning the salmon, please. I probably won't get to it, but I'd like to know more in case I want to try it.

 

I also wonder about potting the salmon. I like potted shrimp, why not potted salmon? That could be done without the high pressure I suspect canning the salmon would require.

 

I pressure can it with nothing other than a half teaspoon of salt per 4 oz jar (this is about the same amount as you would get in a purchased can of salmon) - the fish gives off enough liquid/oil. It must be pressure canned - as with all meat or meat containing products. Some leave the skin on, I don't. Bones are fine and turn soft and calcium rich once canned. Friend of mine cans the skin and scraps for dog food. My husband and I have a deal - he catches and cleans, I process. It is leaps and bounds above commercially canned salmon. My late friend had a connection for fresh caught tuna and we would get together and can that as well. Absolutely no comparison to what I grew up knowing as canned tuna.

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