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Recipe management


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6 hours ago, Bernie said:

I hope everyone realizes that when you start using the cloud (or indeed any free web storage) that once you get over a certain size you are stuck with it.

 

No, I'm not stuck with anything.

Purchase, cancellation, & refund policies

 

6 hours ago, Bernie said:

My neighbor stores all his photos on the cloud. He now pays for extra space (only about $1 per month). He says "its only $1 month". I answer with "for now and even if it doesn't rise its $1 a month FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE", then we go and drink more wine.

 

Google offers 15GB free, and $1.99 per month for 100GB. That's a small price to pay for the extra space and the ability to access files anywhere.

 

6 hours ago, Bernie said:

BUT he has so many photos stored he can't download the lot and he can't actually view or find them randomly because there are just too many.

Just on that Google now stores your phone photos in a "new & better" format. All good, saves you space right. Well it turns out you need a google app to open them.

 

Photos CAN be organized (labeled in "info") and then put into albums and, if you wish, downloaded to your PC.

When they're downloaded you can open them in any program you wish.

You have even more control if you organize them into folders in Google Drive.

AND

"Thanks to Google's new Backup and Sync application for computers, you can now back up Google photos to your Windows PC or Mac automatically. "

Back up photos & videos

https://photos.google.com/apps

 

6 hours ago, Bernie said:

Whats the bet that now advertising revenue is falling, Google will start reducing their  free online storage limits and start charging to store on the cloud.

 

What proof do you have of this? If it does become truth I have everything backed up on four 1 GB drives and in other places.

 

6 hours ago, Bernie said:

Its fine to have lots of information (even at home) but if it takes a long time to find anything it becomes useless.

 

That's a symptom of poor organization.
 

As for back-ups: Back-ups of ANY files is ALWAYS recommended.

 

 

Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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What form(s) are everybody's recipes in? I'm guessing Microsoft Word-type documents (and PDF files) and internet / web bookmarks. How about just taking a look at the table of contents of a general-type cookbook (e.g., Betty Crocker) and make folders: (1) appetizers, (2) soups, etc. Then drop your recipe files into the correct folder.

 

From there, you can make sub-folders (cream soups, clear soups, whatever).

 

I don't have many recipes and I've had to reorganize my files a few times. I have maybe odd-sounding folders: "bean dishes," "breakfast," "one-pot-pan," etc. As long as it makes sense to me, I'm happy.

betty-crocker-toc.jpg

Edited by MokaPot
to add "PDF" files (log)
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Whatever folders suit me.

Then whatever sub-folders I may want.

Recipes are saved in mostly *.pdf — some *odt (LibreOffice ODF)

 

A partial example.....

 

Modernist

 

BBQ

 

Charcuterie

   Sausagemaking

   Cured Meats

 

Cheesmaking

    Hard Cheeses

    Soft Cheeses

 

Winemaking

     Wild Fruit Wines

     Unique Wines

 

Fermented Foods

      Fermented Vegetables

      Milk based ferments

 

Family Recipes

 

Etc. Etc. Etc.

 

 

 

 

 

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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@DiggingDogFarm replied to @Bernie

DDF20200412.jpg.5a045c426798cac6b999381b95680b30.jpg

So true.

 

There's a myriad of things whizzing by in this thread, so I would like to add these points:

  • When I got started with Evernote I used a sheetfed scanner which automatically does optical character recognition (OCR) and saves files in .pdf format. OCR  means that those notes in  Evernote are SEARCHABLE. So, it helps to learn a little about SEARCH (which will further assist your interactions with Mr. Google). Scanners can be had for a couple hundred bucks. Using a sheetfed scanner you put in a stack of pages and it feeds them automatically. I did several thousands of pages of documents in a couple of weeks.
  • A weblink for a favourite recipe is useless if the page is deleted from the website. Evernote has a web clipper which will copy the data on the webpage. Once in Evernote it is fully searchable. Evernote will remember where it copied the recipe from.
  • One drawback of being able to search for words in any note (originally document or website) is that if, for example, you're looking for how long to sous vide eggs to get them perfectly soft-boiled, searching for any presence of "egg" will return many, many results. Enter "tags" which can be attached to any note. The hardest part of my scanning documents adventure was figuring out my structure for classification.
  • In Evernote there are tags which are an advantage when searching for
    "Eggs Boiled Soft" which is performed using " tag:egg* " (without quotes)
    which won't produce results for every dern recipe with eggs in them
  • One of the interesting things about tags is that one no longer needs a "top down" structure of classification. For example, you could have a tag for "grill" and an unrelated tag for "eggplant" which happens to be a sub-tag of "vegetables".  Fortunately, the structure can be modified anytime, so you can figure it out as you go.

If anyone is interested, I will ask Chris if we can have a thread for discussion of using Evernote for recipe management. Say so if you want to explore this further.
 

What this method doesn't solve is searching through one's printed cookbooks (as mentioned previously). I also keep my Diaries on paper (in binders) e.g. Sous Vide, Instant Pot, etc.

Edited by TdeV (log)
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I too use Evernote.  I just copy and paste into the various notebooks.  I wouldn't mind learning how to expand on my use of it.

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I have it, but would like to learn to use it better. Have never used it for recipes.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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10 hours ago, TdeV said:

@DiggingDogFarm replied to @Bernie

DDF20200412.jpg.5a045c426798cac6b999381b95680b30.jpg

So true.

 

There's a myriad of things whizzing by in this thread, so I would like to add these points:

  • When I got started with Evernote I used a sheetfed scanner which automatically does optical character recognition (OCR) and saves files in .pdf format. OCR  means that those notes in  Evernote are SEARCHABLE. So, it helps to learn a little about SEARCH (which will further assist your interactions with Mr. Google). Scanners can be had for a couple hundred bucks. Using a sheetfed scanner you put in a stack of pages and it feeds them automatically. I did several thousands of pages of documents in a couple of weeks.
  • A weblink for a favourite recipe is useless if the page is deleted from the website. Evernote has a web clipper which will copy the data on the webpage. Once in Evernote it is fully searchable. Evernote will remember where it copied the recipe from.
  • One drawback of being able to search for words in any note (originally document or website) is that if, for example, you're looking for how long to sous vide eggs to get them perfectly soft-boiled, searching for any presence of "egg" will return many, many results. Enter "tags" which can be attached to any note. The hardest part of my scanning documents adventure was figuring out my structure for classification.
  • In Evernote there are tags which are an advantage when searching for
    "Eggs Boiled Soft" which is performed using " tag:egg* " (without quotes)
    which won't produce results for every dern recipe with eggs in them
  • One of the interesting things about tags is that one no longer needs a "top down" structure of classification. For example, you could have a tag for "grill" and an unrelated tag for "eggplant" which happens to be a sub-tag of "vegetables".  Fortunately, the structure can be modified anytime, so you can figure it out as you go.

If anyone is interested, I will ask Chris if we can have a thread for discussion of using Evernote for recipe management. Say so if you want to explore this further.
 

What this method doesn't solve is searching through one's printed cookbooks (as mentioned previously). I also keep my Diaries on paper (in binders) e.g. Sous Vide, Instant Pot, etc.

 

I'm using Evernote too as I find it's the most usable method. I use plenty of tags for each recipe I save, so it's easy to search. And it also allows to to head straight back to the original source if you want to.

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On 4/10/2020 at 11:08 AM, DiggingDogFarm said:

I'm currently using 26.1 GB of Google Drive space for my various interests.

I do quadruple backups, just in case!

 

I'm in Google drive as well. I love that i can send a pdf of a recipe easily by text to a cook or print out a recipe on any computer -if im in a strange kitchen doing catering. it's really versatile

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Can i plug Allrecipes dot com? I will say, i am not a fan of putting valuable information on the cloud, but the site, and app is very easy. I have a lot of private recipes i would be sad if they went Poof one day, but its my fault for being too cheap or lazy to print them out like the good ol' days.

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I use Paprika, on both my laptop and phone. It's pretty great at parsing web recipes, such that only rarely do I find myself needing to do much in the way of manual entry (beyond assigning recipes to my own category structure). 

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As I have posted before, I am a Paprika user.  I don't think a week goes by that I don't use it for something and I typically use it on at least several occasions throughout a given week.  I can understand some reluctance to shell out $30 for the Windows or Mac desktop versions, although I don't think that is an unreasonable amount to charge for a desktop application.  They do offer a 30 day free trial.  Perhaps even better would be to get started with the iOS or Android version on your phone and/or tablet/Chromebook for $4.99.  They also have had a sale at Thanksgiving for at least the past few years with the desktop versions marked down to half price.

 

Although I own the Windows version, since I bought a Chromebook 90+ percent of my use has been on my Chromebook and phone.  I do most of my recipe importing/capturing/editing on my Chromebook, but usually refer to my phone while I am cooking and shopping.   I often decide to make something while I am shopping and then quickly look up a recipe so that I don't forget to buy something I'll need.  To me, one saved trip back to the store is more than worth the cost of the app. 

 

The free cloud syncing is one of the best features and a single Android or iOS purchase will allow you to use it on multiple devices (they must be tied to the same app store account, like any app).  My version 1 desktop install still syncs with my version 3 devices, which is nice.  It may have been fixed in version 3, but I should note that version 1 takes an unusually long time to start up on my Windows desktop.  

 

As for being stuck with a cloud service or specific format, Paprika will export either in Paprika format or in html.  The html file it produces can be viewed and used in any browser.  Any software that can capture recipes from the web should be able to import from the html file. 

 

For any users who may not have noticed, Paprika (and likely other programs that capture recipes from the web) can often download a recipe that is hidden behind a paywall.  Even if you have a subscription, this allows you to proceed without logging in.  You won't be able to see the recipe in the Paprika browser,  but if you click the download button the recipe will be captured.  I believe that is because most sites utilize a format that includes the recipe details in the "invisible" metadata contained within the page.  I have run into one or two sites that cleverly insert metadata for a different recipe with their paywall though (always the same recipe).

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 4/14/2020 at 3:50 AM, rustwood said:

I have run into one or two sites that cleverly insert metadata for a different recipe with their paywall though (always the same recipe).

 

Oh golly. I hadn't tried scraping a paywalled recipe with Paprika before, but how brilliant/evil. The Cook's Illustrated Eggplant Parm recipe yields an ingredient list of:

 

4 teaspoons salt
2 chocolate bar biscuit croissant topping
1 jelly cotton candy
½ jelly gummies
2 cups liquorice chocolate
2 jelly beans bonbon
2 caramels tart gummi bears
6 butterscotch caramel lollipops
12 tbsp butter
¼ cup sugar

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