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FeChef

Need ideas: Rabbit for Easter

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Posted (edited)

Local Grocery just started selling whole Rabbit(frozen). I never tried, nor seen it being sold at a chain grocery store before. So naturally i had to buy it. Figured what better time to try Bunny then Easter. But i have no clue how to prepare it. It came frozen no head,no feet, and no skin.

 

Thanks.


Edited by Smithy Corrected title spelling (log)

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I am no expert on rabbit, but I can tell you that it is extremely lean and easy to overcook.  That said, I find it delicious!  

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Rabbit is a favorite of mine although I seldom encounter it.    It is a delicate, mild meat.    I used to just moosh  legs in salt, pepper and evoo, then grill to barely cooked through. 

Two of the finest restaurant dishes I've ever had were rabbit.   One at Delfina in SF and one by Eric Frechon in Paris.   Both were braises, and both were Italian influenced.    Here is one idea.

I would add that at each restaurant, I snagged the last portion which probably means it was prepared the day before.   This is one of those dishes that might well improve with a day of rest.


eGullet member #80.

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Posted (edited)

If i go the braise route, because it is a lean meat, could it benefit to use a Instant pot vs a tradtional dutch oven? Also, because i will probably have the oven full of other dishes.


Edited by FeChef (log)

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May I suggest a Catalan preparation ?

 

Chop the rabbit up in a few pieces, salt & pepper lightly dredge in flour and fry in hot olive oil until golden. Remove, add some garlic & onion. Fry until slightly colored, then add some chopped mushrooms (any will do), and - ideally - some dried ones as well. Add some Brandy and white wine. Return the rabbit, cover in aluminum foil and put into moderately hot oven to braise for 1.5h. 
Adjust seasoning and serve ...

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39 minutes ago, FeChef said:

If i go the braise route, because it is a lean meat, could it benefit to use a Instant pot vs a tradtional dutch oven? Also, because i will probably have the oven full of other dishes.

 

I don't have an instant pot but would alternatively let it simmer on lowest heat, stovetop, if I didn't want to use the oven.


eGullet member #80.

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2 hours ago, heidih said:

My old cards say "navarin" My first was at Valentino - it was "something else"  https://la.eater.com/2019/1/2/18163217/valentino-closed-santa-monica-last-days-feature Tad heavy on the sherry - 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_1301.JPG

 

And i thought my hand writing was worse then a doctors.

 

Is that 1 cup chicken and 1 cup beef broth? I was going to use a homade chick stock, not going to use beef.

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Posted (edited)
30 minutes ago, FeChef said:

And i thought my hand writing was worse then a doctors.

 

Is that 1 cup chicken and 1 cup beef broth? I was going to use a homade chick stock, not going to use beef.

 

That is my good handwriting! Blame the French nuns - a mashup of American and French and my stubborn streak. No idea why 2 different stocks. Anything with good flavor. On a desperate day watered down soy sauce works ;)


Edited by heidih (log)

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1 hour ago, heidih said:

 

That is my good handwriting! Blame the French nuns - a mashup of American and French and my stubborn streak. No idea why 2 different stocks. Anything with good flavor. On a desperate day watered down soy sauce works ;)

 

I was thinking Chicken stock, and a white wine and cream, I just feel the sauce should be light in both flavor, and color. I guess im making up my own here, but i just don;t know how to approach this. Im kinda thinking almost 40 cloves chicken type of dish. Am i making a mistake?

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18 minutes ago, FeChef said:

I was thinking Chicken stock, and a white wine and cream, I just feel the sauce should be light in both flavor, and color. I guess im making up my own here, but i just don;t know how to approach this. Im kinda thinking almost 40 cloves chicken type of dish. Am i making a mistake?

 

Is there not a quote about "there are no mistakes". Experiments drive human progress. Though I say leave the moon alone - lets just figure out earth first ;)

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21 minutes ago, heidih said:

 

Is there not a quote about "there are no mistakes". Experiments drive human progress. Though I say leave the moon alone - lets just figure out earth first ;)

 

Quote

A man of genius makes no mistakes; his errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery...

 

James Joyce Ulysses

 

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Well damn. Does anyone think a recipe like 40 cloves chicken would work with Rabbit? If you are unfamilar, Alton brown did a episode on it. 

 

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10 hours ago, heidih said:

 

That is my good handwriting! Blame the French nuns - a mashup of American and French and my stubborn streak. No idea why 2 different stocks. Anything with good flavor. On a desperate day watered down soy sauce works ;)

 

Two stocks are common in many dishes.  We always used both chicken and beef when making onion soup.


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Id go w @liuzhou 

 

suggestion .  mustard .

 

dont put it in an iPot .   the meat wil end up being very tender  

 

but the flavor of the meat will have been squeezed out into the stock.

 

if you do SV ,   cut up the R into pieces that you can vac.

 

coat each pice lightly in good quality mustard    no salt   mustard has salt

 

and SV  .      135 - 140     3 - 4 hours minimum

 

you wont get growing of course , but it will be very tasty

 

no I have not made rabbit SV.    no rabbit to be had w/o great expense and a lot of

 

fiddle faddle in my area.

 

""  it tastes just like  really really really good dark meat chicken.  "

 

rabbit with mustard     goggle this

 

 

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Yes mustard and rabbit= Ginger & Fred

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I hope you heartless people at least wait until the bunny has delivered his Easter goodies.  Next you will be posting how you ate Rudolph the Reindeer on Christmas Eve!  Where will it end?😜

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@IowaDee 

 

Rudolph   might already be in @Shelby 's   freezer

 

cant say if she pickled his nose , w serranos or jalapeños. 

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Showcase the saddle and fry the rest.

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~Martin :)

I try to find the good food in every situation!

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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