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Making a few donuts at a time


Marmish
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Our weekend routine is to pick up donuts, from either Dunkin (chocolate long johns) or a local shop (fancy donuts). I’d like to make long johns at home but I only need 4 at a time. I’m wondering if I could roll, cut, then freeze some of the dough. I’d thaw overnight in the fridge and fry in the morning. What say you?

 

first hit in a google search recipe for reference: https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/87673/long-johns/

 

 

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Worth a try, works with other yeast-risen pastries like croissants and cinnamon rolls.

 

Cake doughnuts might be easier to make a tiny batch of, they're usually a simple dough that can be mixed together quickly.

Edited by pastrygirl (log)
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Debbie downer here - to me the appeal of freshly fried donuts is the fresh part if talking yeasted light ones verus cake. . I would just do a small batch which is so simple and next time whip up another.  do get that the fry pat is a bt  f a pain but it plays out well with company to share the delight with.

Edited by heidih (log)
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No problems if you freeze them after cutting.

Beware that yeasts cells keep dying while in the freezer. This means that proofing times will be longer than usual, and the more time they stay in the freezer the longer the proofing time will be. After about 4-6 weeks you start going in the risk zone.

So it's better if you prepare a batch worth for 1 month and not more. If you want to be sure add about 10-20% more yeast to your recipe.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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1 hour ago, teonzo said:

No problems if you freeze them after cutting.

Beware that yeasts cells keep dying while in the freezer. This means that proofing times will be longer than usual, and the more time they stay in the freezer the longer the proofing time will be. After about 4-6 weeks you start going in the risk zone.

So it's better if you prepare a batch worth for 1 month and not more. If you want to be sure add about 10-20% more yeast to your recipe.

 

 

 

Teo

 


Thanks. I’m going to try this weekend. 
 

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