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Food in the time of a pandemic


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On 8/22/2020 at 9:14 PM, Franci said:

So, yes, we went to the fishmonger again. We got a mangrove snapper, 2 snapper heads, clams and 2 orate (sea breams) which I suspect are imported from Greece and these taste nice but since I know @heidihis going to ask, they taste different than the wild sea breams because they are fattier than the wild ones and it’s all saying since sea bream is a fattier fish to start in comparison to branzino.  I think we’ll go more often with the mangrove snapper that is half the price, local and wild. 

 

 

ED73967C-83AF-480E-91C4-BFEAB07B5F8A.jpeg

Can you tell me where the Fishmonger is located as we would love to buy fresh fish. 

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52 minutes ago, liamsaunt said:

Not sure what I am going to do with the massive kohlrabi.  The fennel will go into a seafood stew once I get to the Cape later today.

 

31 minutes ago, Duvel said:


Have you ever had Kohlrabi salad with apple ? Its very common here and at least for me the best way to eat Kohlrabi (which I truly disliked whem cooked) ...

 

https://www.gutekueche.at/kohlrabisalat-mit-aepfel-rezept-15362

 

Good suggestion.  I don't care for it cooked, either, but like it raw.  Cut into julienne, kohlrabi can replace cabbage in any sort of slaw-type salad. 

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1 hour ago, liamsaunt said:

This week's CSA box:

 

 

 

Not sure what I am going to do with the massive kohlrabi.  The fennel will go into a seafood stew once I get to the Cape later today.

Since you like making SE Asian food, I would shred the kohlrabi and turn it into somtum...

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The lockdown restrictions on regional Victoria Australia have just eased, although Melbourne is still isolated. This means the other states are easing their border restrictions so that crews can come in to harvest crops. This is huge for the food industry. There are still issues because they can't bring in workers from other countries but it helps.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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4 hours ago, CarlMacLeods said:

Well that can be a good chance for people who lost their jobs. They can go harvest crops and replace foreign workers.

 

It is a very specific skill and grueling labor.  The emergency medical personnel would be more overwhelmed than they already are and the packing plants would reject most of the produce.

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On 9/12/2020 at 2:17 PM, KennethT said:

Since you like making SE Asian food, I would shred the kohlrabi and turn it into somtum...

 

That is what I did.  Thank you for the suggestion!

 

Here is this week's CSA box.  My sister brought it out to the Cape for me, she is staying for the weekend (she lives with us at home so is in our quarantine pod).  My Mom was really mad that my sister waited for the box to come before heading out--she wanted it haha!

 

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3 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

At Shoprite I saw something that I cannot unsee:  a customer in the produce section shopping for some broccoli removed her mask, licked her hand to open a plastic bag, and returned the mask to her face.

 

 

And then, touched broccoli with her hand ? ....  blech

 

I wonder if I would have the grace to offer her some hand sanitizer after seeing that. Knowing how other people had bad experiences engaging strangers,  I likely wouldn't have but there's hope.   Maybe.  Maybe not ...

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38 minutes ago, JeanneCake said:

 

And then, touched broccoli with her hand ? ....  blech

 

I wonder if I would have the grace to offer her some hand sanitizer after seeing that. Knowing how other people had bad experiences engaging strangers,  I likely wouldn't have but there's hope.   Maybe.  Maybe not ...

 

Last week I saw an employee in the dairy section with her mask below her nose.  I should note most people I see are doing a good job of following regulations.

 

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1 minute ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Last week I saw an employee in the dairy section with her mask below her nose.  I should note most people I see are doing a good job of following regulations.

 

I see way too many employees with the under nose mask here. I always let a manager/supervisor know what’s going on. No names, just department and when observed.

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17 minutes ago, DesertTinker said:

I see way too many employees with the under nose mask here. I always let a manager/supervisor know what’s going on. No names, just department and when observed.

 

I thought of saying something at the Shoprite office but the people there were helping other customers and I did not want to be late for work.

 

At the library where I work staff not wearing masks and gloves properly may be sent home.  Patrons repeatedly ignoring regulations may be asked to leave and be banned.  Again, most people, even three year olds are wearing masks and trying to do the right thing.  OK, maybe some of the three year olds are not so good at maintaining social distance but at least they are wearing their masks and keeping their noses covered.

 

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11 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

At Shoprite I saw something that I cannot unsee:  a customer in the produce section shopping for some broccoli removed her mask, licked her hand to open a plastic bag, and returned the mask to her face.

 

People are just idiots. Really no other way to put it.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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The one time Shoprite had fresh corn, an employee was kind to let me know (when they observed my struggle with the plastic bag) if I rubbed my fingertips on the silk of the ear I was holding, it would give the needed traction. I have adopted a strategy of grabbing multiple plastic bags first, heading to the lettuce area where there are stray water droplets on the shelves, and wetting my fingers so I open all of the bags at once and have them ready to go in the cart.

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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34 minutes ago, BeeZee said:

I have adopted a strategy of grabbing multiple plastic bags first, heading to the lettuce area where there are stray water droplets on the shelves, and wetting my fingers so I open all of the bags at once and have them ready to go in the cart.

 

I have been doing this for a Loooooooong time!

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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2 hours ago, BeeZee said:

The one time Shoprite had fresh corn, an employee was kind to let me know (when they observed my struggle with the plastic bag) if I rubbed my fingertips on the silk of the ear I was holding, it would give the needed traction. I have adopted a strategy of grabbing multiple plastic bags first, heading to the lettuce area where there are stray water droplets on the shelves, and wetting my fingers so I open all of the bags at once and have them ready to go in the cart.

I use mesh bags that can be washed.

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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On 3/23/2020 at 1:30 PM, weinoo said:

It's hard to know where to put this new piece of information I just gleaned from Toni Tipton-Martin's Jubilee. She has a section on baked beans in which her research digs up this possible origin. Most of us think of baked beans as a yankee dish. It's always been too sweet for me; I guess I like my beans soupier and spicier, as in a pot of red chile or red beans and rice. She claims one possible origin is that sea captains brought the dish back from North Africa and/ or Spain and suggests that originally it was the Sephardic Jewish version of cholent, the beans and meat that cooked all night so that you didn't have to cook on the sabbath. That's about as far as she takes it, and she never mentions cholent. 

 

It never would have occurred to me! It may have started with a sweet component added, like maybe honey or pomegranate molasses or date syrup. I've never tasted cholent, just heard my mother talk about it from her early childhood. Perhaps it also made its way to the south directly from Aftica, and they added their own local molasses to sweeten in up. Somewhere along the line the meat morphed from beef to pork. I love this theory!

 

Related to news about TTM and not the sabbath, I just heard she has been named editor of Bon Appetit to hopefully bring it back from disgrace. I haven't looked at that magazine in years, so this can only be good news.

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