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Food in the time of a pandemic


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18 hours ago, haresfur said:

 

 Not that that is an issue in sane countries.

 

1. be nice

2. many servers here apparently prefer tips to receiving healthcare and a fair wage. one assumes that they've done the math that applies to them.

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I assume the opposite, but am admittedly a cynic in some respects.

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Had to meet a client today, so I ran by the liquor store and Kroger while I was out. Luckily the liquor store seems to have no problem keeping my preferred box wine in stock. However, at Kroger, the shelves were bare of rice, dry beans, flour and bottled water. Cereal was low, as was bread. Canned veg aisle seemed to be holding up (all I needed was pimiento peppers, and those are right on the end, so I didn't look closely). And gas was $1.87 a gallon.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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well 

 

its now very different 

 

and will remain so

 

Im optimistic 

 

as it might help me 

 

in my personal age group

 

to do reasonably well

 

Im grateful were where I grew up

 

and  parents that did not get me for Christmas 

 

those snippy  electric things :

 

9c54a651bc9c520a00336ba41bbb936b.jpg.526df15fddba077e842867580b394c28.jpg

 

and  5 yo might not Lust for these 

 

these were Hot Hot Hot

 

in 1954

 

based on the B & W commercial

 

now Badge 714 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragnet_(1951_TV_series)

 

was  The Big City north of me

 

which has , I hope still  avery fine Zoo

 

so for me :

 

Im fine

 

I do know AKA looking forward to something 

 

really matters 

 

Im looking forward 

 

to a nice dinner 

 

some TJ's table white wine

 

and 

 

"" Better Call Saul ""

 

season 5 episode 5

 

and

 

BCS  is not the the interesting point 

 

consider looking forward to something 

 

a couple of days in the future 

 

and do it again

Edited by rotuts (log)
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Who remembers milk boxes? The little boxes that were built into any house where the milkman could open the outside door and place the milk in it and then from the inside the homeowner could retrieve the milk. What I wouldn’t give for one of those now! Just imagine its usefulness. This was brought to mind by an article in the British guardian which suggested that the letter box could be used to deliver drugs to shut ins. Pharmaceutical drugs I mean not the other kind. None of us have letter boxes anymore.  Here we don’t even have mailboxes unless you count the community mailbox which is not very useful in this situation. We should be slow to turn our backs on things that have served us well. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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16 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Who remembers milk boxes? The little boxes that were built into any house where the milkman could open the outside door and place the milk in it and then from the inside the homeowner could retrieve the milk.


We had one on the front porch, but not built in. It was insulated to keep milk from freezing, at least for a while.  As I recall, they were provided by the dairy and sported their logo as a bit of advertising.   Even if you had to step out on to the purchase to open the box, it would still be handy for these times.
 

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I do remember the Milk Box  at the side of my house

 

in the low to mid '50's

 

I remember the ' wheel ' of selections you put into

 

the glass empties being returned that day

 

the truck ? like this :

 

MT.jpg.bdc7b5ee615fbad5cee2ebe768c24af7.jpg

 

the driver , whom I never say

 

like this :

 

619333846_MD2.jpg.65d9abd55f5fd2bc2dcb08abe3a620c6.jpg

 

 

and I remember those door  @ 4 ys  i found them fascinating 

 

I wish i could find a pic  of the ' wheel '

 

that one used to make your days selection

 

it was pretty thick w all your choices 

 

and in color !

 

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Yes we too had one of those wheels.  It was from Edgemar Dairy based in Santa Monica, CA.  It had a different color for every product.  They also sold compost by the load at the dairy itself.  We rented a trailer and picked up a  load more than once.  The mushroom farm in Oxnard used the stuff by the ton too.

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We had them  in a couple of places as well.  I seem to remember bread being delivered and left in those same milk boxes.  Or maybe I'm imagining things?

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@rotuts  we had the same dairy when I was a kid.  Our milkman dressed just like that, his name was Fergie. And I’d forgotten all about the wheel but it fascinated me, easily amused as a kid.

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I don't think they had Compost Foremost

 

offered Compost in Los Altos CA

 

garvel roads we had  , and septic tanks

 

Id love to see one of those wheels.

 

fascinated i was then ,a nd am still now

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Oh yes, Helms Bakery trucks.  You had a placard with a big letter H on it that put  you in the window to let the driver know you wanted him to stop.  Had the best gooseberry pie ever made on earth.  Went on a field trip to the bakery in grade school and got "drunk"on the smell of baking bread.  Never been the same since!  And, back to the wheel.  In my memory it included more than just milk products.  Wasn't there orange juice and eggs on it as well? Not sure about the eggs though.

Edited by IowaDee (log)
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Sooooo

 

who is going to find the correct term  for the wheel

 

and fins some pics ?

 

I have some Kudos

 

looking for a good home .....

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My guardian's first husband was a milkman.  He succumbed to the white death.  Tuberculosis is spread by milk from infected cows.

 

Terrified alone at home again today I stayed in bed till mid afternoon.  When I got up I figured I ought to order food.  One of the sources for my pantry staples is Supermarket Italy.  Eight cans of DOP San Marzano coming.  Ten bags of Molino Grassi flour -- six 00, four semolina.  Cans of Spanish clams.  As a treat I threw in some died pasta (of which they offered plenty).  And sauces:  harissa, HP*, and Marie Sharp.  I had a store credit of $5.00 I'd forgotten about!

 

I'm down to my last three cookies.  Hopefully I'll find the energy to bake some more.

 

 

*OK, not Italian.

 

 

 

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I sent my order of 21 items to my nearby grocer this morning for curbside pickup.

At lest 8 of those items were out of stock.

i found out from my friend that a smaller market hadn’t quite sold down as much so I drove there where I got my white sugar, brown sugar, canned pumpkin (for Lucy), crushed pineapple, crackers, cookies, etc.  
There was a lot of re-stocking of shelves going on so I hope that everyone got what they needed.

Amazing how much pasta and milk was going thru the checkouts.

ETA:  I had to buy 10 pounds of sugar because  hat was he only size bags they had.

Edited by lindag (log)
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What I can't find at any normal price is Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt.  I have an emergency supply of a couple pounds but I sure wish I had another box.

 

I received a case of sugar a few weeks ago so that should last a little while.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Anna N said:

Who remembers milk boxes? The little boxes that were built into any house where the milkman could open the outside door and place the milk in it and then from the inside the homeowner could retrieve the milk.

We didn't have a milk box or  milk man. We had a local drive-through dairy and a wire "basket" carrier for the glass bottles. You drive up, give the attendant your empty bottles and get filled bottles in return.

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Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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No milk box, but we did have dairy delivery.   You had a usual order and requested extraordinary product by stuffing a note in an empty bottle.   In winter, you would occasionally find over an inch or so of frozen cream extending from the top of the bottle.   Yes, cream since this was before homogenization.   

 

We also had a chicken and rabbit lady who came into town every week or so with fresh product.   As I marginally remember, rabbits were dressed but chickens needed to be drawn.   Maybe not.   I do remember with some angst my mother insisting that I learn how to draw a chicken.   I wasn't amused,   She said it was  necessary should I marry someone who hunted.    I told her that I would ask any guy first if he liked to hunt.    Always the pragmatist. 

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eGullet member #80.

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

What I can't find at any normal price is Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt. 

 

I never have a handle on this household staple.    I lost count just short of $4 but recently find it over that.    What's your sense?

eGullet member #80.

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3 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

I never have a handle on this household staple.    I lost count just short of $4 but recently find it over that.    What's your sense?

 

$14.93 on amazon.  Other online sources I deal with are sold out.  Not sure about Shoprite; I have not been there to check.  However last time I shopped people were buying multiple boxes.

 

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Just now, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

$14.93 on amazon.  Other online sources I deal with are sold out.  Not sure about Shoprite; I have not been there to check.  However last time I shopped people were buying multiple boxes.

 

  899489856_ScreenShot2020-03-17at6_55_09PM.thumb.png.affc9d05165d6f675d45a239ea1fa111.png
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eGullet member #80.

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