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haresfur

Food in the time of a pandemic

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2 hours ago, rotuts said:

@gfweb  

 

no your got the burger , charcoal broiled 

 

to your done ness 

 

maybe w cheese , but not for us 

 

then you went to the vast number of bowls of stuff 

 

and added your own

 

its possible Kirk's  as so enlightened then

 

they never dealt w GBP  or   " grilled mixed peppers '

 

can't say for sure

 

Good Times    Old Times 

 

and those who controlled Russia were going to Kuke Us 

 

esp me 

 

any minute

 

just to be clear 

 


 

I don’t get it. Is a take out burger the answer to this dilemma?

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We went grocery shopping today (Loblaw's) the first time in a week.  We got everything on our list except a tube of tomato paste.  Our list included frozen vegetables (sorry, Anna), fresh veg., milk, sour cream.  And a bunch of other stuff.  No meat.  The store seemed fully stocked, including toilet paper but no disinfectant of any sort.  They had a security person standing outside, limiting the number of people who could be in there at one time.  Carts were outside, lysol and paper towels were provided so you could clean the cart.

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2 hours ago, Spork said:


 

Yes. Bloom is the hillbilly term for cuticle. 
 

Take what times and temps I’ve offered and adjust to your circumstances. 
 

I’ve business traveled Mexico, there is a lot of variance in “unrefrigerated” temps.

We are having an early summer.  Normally we don't hit 90 until May (then the rains start in June and our summer highs are below 80), but we have hit 90 twice this past 10 days.  Our interior is 78-80.  No a/c (or heating) here.  I think 5 weeks in fridge will be fine for me.  I worry about food supply chain, but so far so good.  No shortages of anything, not even TP!

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6 minutes ago, gulfporter said:

We are having an early summer.  Normally we don't hit 90 until May (then the rains start in June and our summer highs are below 80), but we have hit 90 twice this past 10 days.  Our interior is 78-80.  No a/c (or heating) here.  I think 5 weeks in fridge will be fine for me.  I worry about food supply chain, but so far so good.  No shortages of anything, not even TP!


 

Don’t let them sweat.  As @heidh mentioned in the link. As my foremothers insisted. 
 

Cooler is better. 

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17 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

We went grocery shopping today (Loblaw's) the first time in a week.  We got everything on our list except a tube of tomato paste.  Our list included frozen vegetables (sorry, Anna), fresh veg., milk, sour cream.  And a bunch of other stuff.  No meat.  The store seemed fully stocked, including toilet paper but no disinfectant of any sort.  They had a security person standing outside, limiting the number of people who could be in there at one time.  Carts were outside, lysol and paper towels were provided so you could clean the cart.

Ed shopped in Super Store this morning (part of the Loblaws enterprise).  Had to wait about five minutes to get in and then the shopping was fine.  But then...it took over half an hour to check the groceries out.  He said the line-up went to the back of the store and half way around.  Why were so few cash registers open?  Strange use of staff.

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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MT’s governor has shut us down as of midnight tonight.

I decided to make a run into town for a couple of Papa Murphy’s take and bake pizzas.

i noticed quite a few restaurants that were closed (probably for take-out only).

i also noted a big drop in gas prices!  It was $1.99 today versus $2.34 last time I checked.

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Posted (edited)

Not the prettiest of plates - but it was tasty.  When live east coast lobsters are cheaper than salmon ($9/lb CDN) I cannot help myself! C86DF6E7-4C09-428D-A44A-2A289288AE8F.thumb.jpeg.d0b81b1fb5b724c937c83183ac4de822.jpegEE91ADE1-FEE8-480F-B9E3-1251708AFCFC.thumb.jpeg.e3835161b48f29bed863825e759b97d0.jpeg

 

edit - @Anna N - I was at Ambrosia's the other day and they had plenty of frozen organic veg - if you need, I can pick some up and we can figure out a transport method to get them over to you...

 

 


Edited by TicTac (log)
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Posted (edited)
28 minutes ago, Darienne said:

Ed shopped in Super Store this morning (part of the Loblaws enterprise).  Had to wait about five minutes to get in and then the shopping was fine.  But then...it took over half an hour to check the groceries out.  He said the line-up went to the back of the store and half way around.  Why were so few cash registers open?  Strange use of staff.

 

When we first got there, there's a very long line for the cash.  I think there were only 2 of maybe 10 open along with the self-checkout.  There was someone there who kept everyone in line which included someone butting in and sending her to the back of it.  By the time we were finished, there was one person ahead of us.  We were lucky because another long line was forming.  A couple of things I had neglected to mention - there was lots of rice in all sizes, and types.   One thing they did not have were clementines.   I shopped for my neighbour who is self-isolating and she wanted clementines.  Bought mandarines instead.  They had everything else she wanted.


Edited by ElsieD (log)
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@TicTac  Where ever did you find lobster for $9 a pound?

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Sunny Supermarket - Leslie and Finch - excellent variety of live and very fresh fish.

 

Here's a question for you folks with more experience than I with Lobster stock -

 

I took the shells and created a very nice reduced stock from the above meal, I would like to make a sauce out of it go to with a deconstructed poutine tomorrow, but I am not sure which route to take....help!

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Started the day off...

 

MTDJ4821.jpeg.6ea38ca763870113de77e38fc5412254.jpeg

 

with oatmeal cookies.  Lunch was a nice mix of leftover salads and focaccia made with 48-hour refrigerator dough.

 

Later on was dinner, which started off with...

 

IMG_0395.jpeg.e50c243ff25773781a899106e7b9dd66.jpeg

 

Gamberi al ajillo. And ended with...

 

IMG_E0396.jpeg.b5650cb46a6d2c91d496171225212996.jpeg

 

Paella.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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Made some whole milk yogurt. Recently started to experiment with yogurt-making. I'd like it to be more custardy. But this is nice, IMO.

IMG_0666.jpeg

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1 minute ago, MokaPot said:

Made some whole milk yogurt. Recently started to experiment with yogurt-making. I'd like it to be more custardy. But this is nice, IMO.

IMG_0666.jpeg

 

Congratulations, @MokaPot! Did you make it in that jar? I'd be interested to know your procedure / recipe.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Hi @Smithy Thanks! Yes, I made it in that Ball jar. Recipe (I have no food thermometer):

 

1/4 cup Mountain High whole milk yogurt

3 cups whole milk

 

Heat milk on stove until it starts to bubble. Remove from heat. Let milk cool until it's "baby bath" temperature. Mix yogurt & milk together. Pour into Ball jar. When you put on the jar lid, flip the flat piece upside-down so it's not air-tight. Put in oven, no heat except for the oven light. 5-6 hours.

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I use the descending heat method which requires no equipment other than a heavy lidded pot and some towels or a blanket.  Lovely product.  

 

Set water to boil in a heavy lidded pot, like enameled iron or similar.     Bring milk to a simmer and let cool until you can hold your finger in it for 10 seconds.   Add a teaspoon of commercial yogurt to the milk and mix well.  Empty water from pot and place small jars in it.       Fill jars.   Replace pot lid.   Place pot on a folded blanket and wrap snugly.    Leave until it has cooled to room temp.  We left it overnight.   The yogurt will be somewhat creamy but will set up more as it cools more in the refrigerator.    

 

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eGullet member #80.

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Dinner preparations tonight are almost funny.  Sad, but almost funny.  To go with the candele that I made last night, the plan is a recipe of sugo alla Bolognese from The Romagnolis' Table (p50ff).  Things started off OK.  I double ground the beef chuck and prepared the battuto.  But the first onion I grabbed was rotten.  The second onion was half rotten, maybe three quarters.  In normal times I would have pitched them both.  These aren't normal times.

 

The onion was unbelievably gross so I decided to take out the trash.  However when I went to the hall closet to get a fresh grocery bag for the trashcan I saw a cockroach.  This is one of only two closets in my apartment which does not contain foodstuffs.  I freaked out.  It took a while but I gave the beast the happy dispatch.

 

Then -- why is there always a then? -- a shelf of my refrigerator fell out.  Everything on the floor.  Remarkably nothing broke.  I had to do some metal work to get the shelf reseated.  Then, since one of the kitchen drawers was overfull, I decided to relocate my Matfer chocolate spatula in with the other chocolate making stuff.  My skin is friable, as I may have mentioned, and I tore my arm open on a piece of cardboard.  I stood bleeding on the kitchen floor.  Mostly in front of the refrigerator.  I hope not in the ragu.

 

It's still a good two hours before dinner.  My lovely candele have now dried and cracked.  I understand candele are traditionally broken before cooking though I had hoped to leave these candele whole.  Is that too much to ask?

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, MokaPot said:

Made some whole milk yogurt. Recently started to experiment with yogurt-making. I'd like it to be more custardy. But this is nice, IMO.

 

 

 

I always make my own yoghurt from whole milk to which I add unsweetened full cream powdered milk (30 grams per litre of milk). That makes it more custardy.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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3 hours ago, TicTac said:

 

Here's a question for you folks with more experience than I with Lobster stock -

 

I took the shells and created a very nice reduced stock from the above meal, I would like to make a sauce out of it go to with a deconstructed poutine tomorrow, but I am not sure which route to take....help!

My usual approach is to reduce a bit of dry white wine with some shallot or onion, and a couple of peppercorns. Then add heavy cream and reduce, then add your reduced lobster stock. Taste and adjust as necessary. Small amounts of any herb you like with lobster would be fine. Strain and serve.

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Posted (edited)

@JoNorvelleWalker Calamity Jo?  Small intersections.  I had mice so I bought peanut butter last month which I never do. Today in an effort to not  let the green beans get funky I did them with leftover pasta in a peanut butter sauce. Very nice. Ya never know


Edited by heidih (log)
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Thanks, @liuzhou for the tip about the powdered milk (for a more custardy yogurt). Do you have any particular brand that you can recommend? TIA.

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4 minutes ago, MokaPot said:

Thanks, @liuzhou for the tip about the powdered milk (for a more custardy yogurt). Do you have any particular brand that you can recommend? TIA.

 

I use this one. It is made made by Nestlé, so I guess it's available internationally. The important thing for me is to check it is unsweetened. There are sweet versions. Fine if you want sweet, I suppose, but I don't want sweet.

 

nespray.thumb.jpg.3ae4f0136b8c3c390603df837846f847.jpg

 

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Thanks so much, @liuzhou . I'll be sure to look for the unsweetened. The yogurt I've been making is sweet enough as it is.

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41 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Dinner preparations tonight are almost funny.  Sad, but almost funny.  To go with the candele that I made last night, the plan is a recipe of sugo alla Bolognese from The Romagnolis' Table (p50ff).  Things started off OK.  I double ground the beef chuck and prepared the battuto.  But the first onion I grabbed was rotten.  The second onion was half rotten, maybe three quarters.  In normal times I would have pitched them both.  These aren't normal times.

 

The onion was unbelievably gross so I decided to take out the trash.  However when I went to the hall closet to get a fresh grocery bag for the trashcan I saw a cockroach.  This is one of only two closets in my apartment which does not contain foodstuffs.  I freaked out.  It took a while but I gave the beast the happy dispatch.

 

Then -- why is there always a then? -- a shelf of my refrigerator fell out.  Everything on the floor.  Remarkably nothing broke.  I had to do some metal work to get the shelf reseated.  Then, since one of the kitchen drawers was overfull, I decided to relocate my Matfer chocolate spatula in with the other chocolate making stuff.  My skin is friable, as I may have mentioned, and I tore my arm open on a piece of cardboard.  I stood bleeding on the kitchen floor.  Mostly in front of the refrigerator.  I hope not in the ragu.

 

It's still a good two hours before dinner.  My lovely candele have now dried and cracked.  I understand candele are traditionally broken before cooking though I had hoped to leave these candele whole.  Is that too much to ask?

 

Good grief that sounds miserable. Have a drink and some goldfish. Too right, these aren't normal times. xox.

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25 minutes ago, Katie Meadow said:

Good grief that sounds miserable. Have a drink and some goldfish. Too right, these aren't normal times. xox.

 

Working on a mai tai as we speak.  Water on the boil for pasta.  Not that there's nothing else that could go wrong...just ask @liuzhou.

 

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