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Chocolatemelter

Chocolate vibrating machines from China?

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Hey everyone.

 

So im looking for the most affordable chocolate shaking table that actually works.. does anyone have experience with the ones from AliBaba or china in general?

 

i bought a $100 dental table from amazon but i guess its not the right hrtz cause it kinda works, but not well enough.

 

im looking in the $500 range or under.. any advice? Thanks

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You need to look for somethng that has 2 knobs, one to adjust frequency, the other to adjust the width of the vibrations. Usually all dental tables have at least the knob for the width and it should be enough.

A couple years ago I saw a vibrating table on Alibaba that had the 2 knobs and was sold for about 200 eur, but I lost the link, sorry.

 

 

 

Teo

 


Teo

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