Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Cook-Off #84: Ginger


David Ross
 Share

Recommended Posts

1896 color ginger illustration.jpg

Ginger.  The exotic, ugly little knob that releases and intoxicating perfume with flavor notes of pepper, citrus and tropical fruit.  Yet none of those words fully describes ginger.  It's only after we peel back the outer skin that we get that first waft of the unmistakeable scent of ginger.  

 

Ginger is a flowering plant whose rhizome, or root, is widely used as a spice, but also for medicinal purposes.  Ginger is part of the same family of plants that includes tumeric, cardamom and galangal.  Ginger originated in Southeast Asia, and is reported to have been domesticated some 5,000 years ago.  It became a valuable trade commodity in the spice trade, and was used by the Greeks and the Romans. 

 

Of course, we think of ginger in cuisine, and ginger isn't just used in Asian dishes.  However, a look at worldwide ginger production is also a reflection of the span of ginger across the globe.  The top producer of ginger is India, followed by Nigeria, China, Indonesia, Nepal and Thailand.  But that's just a small part of the story of ginger.  Ginger is used in all sorts of cuisines from around the world.  

 

Ginger isn't simply the knobs in the supermarket produce section.  Travel to your local Asian, Indian, International or Mexican market and you'll find different varieties and cousins of ginger.

 

Ginger.jpg

 

For years I always wondered what those little spears were that garnished Japanese dishes.  Was it some sort of vegetable or fruit.  It wasn't until I became an avid fan of Japanese cooking programs that I learned about "young ginger."  Ginger that is harvested when young.  Sometimes pickled, young ginger is crisp, clean and refreshing yet not as strong as older ginger. 

 

Japanese Young Ginger.jpg

 

Likewise, I was always intrigued by those little knobs at the local Asian market that looked like ginger but tiny in size comparison.  So I bought a little.  And got a big surprise.  Fresh galangal is very spicy, almost hot like a chile, and highly fragrant and flavorful.  It's sold fresh and also dried and gives soups an incredible depth of flavor.

 

Galangal.jpg

 

Well, as you can see, we have a lot of cooking to do. Let's join together and celebrate, discuss and present our best ginger dishes.  This is eG Cook-Off #84: Ginger.

 

See the complete The eGullet Cook-Off Index here.

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Disclosure, we really don't like ginger as a major flavor element in a dish.    So these Salmon, potato and ginger cakes are delicious revelation.    Parenthetically, we don't like salmon either as it is too rich for us as usually prepared.  .  However, these cakes are subtle and haunting, a delightful introduction to ginger for the faint of heart or uninitiated, as well as a way to include healthful salmon in your diet.  

  • Like 4

eGullet member #80.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

❤️ ginger...as the kids would say.  Ed has always said he doesn't like ginger, but has recently discovered that indeed he does.

 

One of my favorites is Triple Ginger Ice Cream, an eG recipe posted by Food Man.  

 

And of course gingerbread recipes:  Old Fashioned Gingerbread Cake from the Spruce Eats is a current favorite.

 

Dark Chocolate coated Candied Ginger.  Yummm.  Recipe for candying the ginger from Andiesenji, my candying everything that moves mentor.

 

And some years ago I actually tried to grow ginger.  It was great joy but alas in the end resulted in nothing.  And now I seem to have deleted the photos.

 

Then there is the plethora of dishes which are  made special by the addition of ginger.  

 

Thanks David Ross for this Cook-off topic. 

 

Found it.  September 2009

1955259048_GingerSept1109.jpg.250692ca2dd5496126af257a90d4c5b1.jpg

Edited by Darienne (log)
  • Like 6

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Disclosure, we really don't like ginger as a major flavor element in a dish.    So these Salmon, potato and ginger cakes are delicious revelation.    Parenthetically, we don't like salmon either as it is too rich for us as usually prepared.  .  However, these cakes are subtle and haunting, a delightful introduction to ginger for the faint of heart or uninitiated, as well as a way to include healthful salmon in your diet.  

That looks like a delicious recipe, and I agree, one doesn't always need to get a hard punch when using ginger.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

33 minutes ago, Darienne said:

❤️ ginger...as the kids would say.  Ed has always said he doesn't like ginger, but has recently discovered that indeed he does.

 

One of my favorites is Triple Ginger Ice Cream, an eG recipe posted by Food Man.  

 

And of course gingerbread recipes:  Old Fashioned Gingerbread Cake from the Spruce Eats is a current favorite.

 

Dark Chocolate coated Candied Ginger.  Yummm.  Recipe for candying the ginger from Andiesenji, my candying everything that moves mentor.

 

And some years ago I actually tried to grow ginger.  It was great joy but alas in the end resulted in nothing.  And now I seem to have deleted the photos.

 

Then there is the plethora of dishes which are  made special by the addition of ginger.  

 

Thanks David Ross for this Cook-off topic. 

 

Found it.  September 2009

1955259048_GingerSept1109.jpg.250692ca2dd5496126af257a90d4c5b1.jpg

 

You put a smile on my face by mentioning gingerbread.  I haven't made it in a long time.  Mother used to make it for dessert and serve it with huge scoops of whipped cream.  I think I'll try making it again, but this time with another form of ginger.  Candied ginger.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use ginger in both savory and sweet dishes, in Asian recipes and American recipes.  This is my recipe for rhubarb chutney which I'll be making in a couple more months once the rhubarb starts peeking up.  The ginger adds another layer of flavor that without would leave the chutney a little flat. I serve the chutney with rack of lamb.

Rhubarb Chutney.JPG

Ingredients-

2 cups chopped rhubarb

1/2 cup granulated sugar

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/3 cup apple cider vinegar

1/3 cup finely chopped onion

1/4 cup golden raisins

1 tbsp. currants

1 tbsp. minced fresh ginger

1/4 tsp. ground cumin

1/4 tsp. cinnamon

1/8 tsp. ground cloves

1/8 tsp. red pepper flakes

1/4 tsp. salt

 

Instructions-

Heat a large saucepot over medium-high heat and add the sugar, brown sugar and apple cider vinegar. Stir and cook until the mixture starts to simmer. Add the onions, raisins, currants, ginger and spices. Stir the chutney as it cooks, about 15-20 minutes. The chutney will start to thicken and the rhubarb will cook down. Add water if the chutney is too thick. Season the chutney with salt and let cool.

 

When the chutney is cool, place in a container and cover and refrigerate. The chutney will go two weeks in the fridge or can be frozen.

 

IMG_1362.JPG

  • Like 6
  • Delicious 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, David Ross said:

You put a smile on my face by mentioning gingerbread.  I haven't made it in a long time.  Mother used to make it for dessert and serve it with huge scoops of whipped cream.  I think I'll try making it again, but this time with another form of ginger.  Candied ginger.

Glad of the smile...but here I go again.  Whipped cream on gingerbread?  I think not.  I grew up eating gingerbread and the only topping ever offered was applesauce.  I don't know about other Canadians.  I've not made a study.   

 

In a similar vein, Canadians invariably (to my somewhat limited knowledge) always eat apple pie with cheddar cheese and yet I have yet to find one American sourced recipe which mentions cheese...only ice cream...and again whipped cream.   Whipped cream on apple pie?  A travesty in my not so humble opinion. 

  • Like 1

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quite a few years ago I posted my method of making candied or crystallized ginger.  I grew my own because here in the California high desert we have a very long growing season and with sufficient mulching, with more than a foot of straw topped by a tarp to protect against too much water during the winter rainy season, it can be overwintered in the ground.

I don't cook as much as I used to because of age and infirmity but I still make small batches of the ginger from rhizomes purchased at a local Asian market, which has much larger pieces.

An odd coincidence, today I am preparing a carrot ginger soup.  I grated the ginger last evening and prepped the carrots before I sat down at the computer.

  • Like 5

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gingerbread men are an integral (read: mandatory) part of our holidays.    Usually three batches, starting immediately after Thanksgiving.

 

I grew up on traditional gingerbread (cake).     But more recently I came across a composite version at B Patisserie in San Francisco.    As close as I can parse it, it contains the usual suspects plus perhaps coffee and a trace of chocolate.    Dusted with powdered sugar,      It is quite intriguing.    I have served my version at dinner parties to rave reviews.    Yes, I dollop it with lightly whipped cream which I flavor VERY lightly with anise.    Sublime.

  • Like 4

eGullet member #80.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Gingerbread men are an integral (read: mandatory) part of our holidays.    Usually three batches, starting immediately after Thanksgiving.

 

I grew up on traditional gingerbread (cake).     But more recently I came across a composite version at B Patisserie in San Francisco.    As close as I can parse it, it contains the usual suspects plus perhaps coffee and a trace of chocolate.    Dusted with powdered sugar,      It is quite intriguing.    I have served my version at dinner parties to rave reviews.    Yes, I dollop it with lightly whipped cream which I flavor VERY lightly with anise.    Sublime.

I would love your version.  Still searching for the perfect recipe.  My Mother's recipe was lost in the sands of time I guess.  I'll pass on the whipped cream.  I still have a freezer full of apple sauce from last fall's harvest.  

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

mmm, gingerbread. Around Christmas time Whole Foods was selling squares (individually wrapped) and I enjoyed it plain for mid-morning snack with tea. I have several varieties of herbal tea in my pantry which contain ginger (mango/ginger, lemon/ginger, ginger/maple...you get the idea). Carrot ginger soup is also a favorite of mine.

  • Like 1

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Darienne said:

Glad of the smile...but here I go again.  Whipped cream on gingerbread?  I think not.  I grew up eating gingerbread and the only topping ever offered was applesauce.  I don't know about other Canadians.  I've not made a study.   

 

In a similar vein, Canadians invariably (to my somewhat limited knowledge) always eat apple pie with cheddar cheese and yet I have yet to find one American sourced recipe which mentions cheese...only ice cream...and again whipped cream.   Whipped cream on apple pie?  A travesty in my not so humble opinion. 


When I was a kid, we ate gingerbread warm with butter. Restaurants typically offered it cool or at room temp with whipped cream (or whipped topping, depending on the demographic) or warmed with ice cream. The restaurant at Peggy's Cove is known for its gingerbread, and serves it in those ways (IIRC believe maple syrup or caramel sauce or something of the sort might be offered as well, it's a few years since I was there). Applesauce is good, too. At my restaurant I paired it with honey ice cream, made with honey from local small-batch producers I knew personally.

 

The apple pie/cheese thing has been discussed here before, I believe. I'd considered it an obscure regional American aberration, and have never actually seen it consumed that way (NS, NL, SK, AB, BC and NB are my provinces of residence so far) except by my American second wife. Mind you this is in no way conclusive, and for all I know it's prevalent in the other four provinces. :P

  • Like 2

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Darienne said:

In a similar vein, Canadians invariably (to my somewhat limited knowledge) always eat apple pie with cheddar cheese and yet I have yet to find one American sourced recipe which mentions cheese...only ice cream...and again whipped cream.   Whipped cream on apple pie?  A travesty in my not so humble opinion. 

@Darienne, girl, you obviously have NOT read my posts!!!  I grew up with:

Apple pie without the cheese

Is like the kiss without the squeeze

 

My great grandmother  used to say this all the time and she grew up in Rhode Island.

 

My husband's family came from Ireland, Germany and Denmark to the Hudson Valley of NY.  These heathens use vanilla ice cream...SHUDDER ….

 

I adore a good gingerbread and also have my great grandmother's receipt for soft molasses and ginger cookies that get topped with a very, very thin shaving of aged cheddar while warm.  When cooled we drizzled with lemon confectioner's sugar.

 

I use ginger in many ways and lately I have been using it, lemongrass, cinnamon sticks, star anise and shallot to make stock for pho...

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, chromedome said:

The apple pie/cheese thing has been discussed here before, I believe. I'd considered it an obscure regional American aberration, and have never actually seen it consumed that way (NS, NL, SK, AB, BC and NB are my provinces of residence so far) except by my American second wife. Mind you this is in no way conclusive, and for all I know it's prevalent in the other four provinces. :P

love you anyway, dude.   🥰

  • Haha 2

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ahh, ginger. I love it. I use it copiously when I do pseudo-Asian stirfries, cucumber salads, and poke. H'mm. I have frozen tuna and frozen edamame. I may have to make poke tonight. 

 

I can take or leave gingerbread. But this recipe for bacon fat gingersnaps is one of the best cookies I've ever eaten in my life. I don't cook them as dark as they recommend; I prefer the chewy to the crispy in this application.

 

  • Like 3

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, kayb said:

I can take or leave gingerbread. But this recipe for bacon fat gingersnaps is one of the best cookies I've ever eaten in my life. I don't cook them as dark as they recommend; I prefer the chewy to the crispy in this application.

 

Holy, expletive deleted, @kayb!!!

I just grabbed my great grandmother's cookbook I have.  I forgot about her gingersnap cookie recipe which she labeled "good"

 

I cup molasses

"   "     sugar

"   "     shortening     -   1 egg

1 Tablespoon vinegar

"          "             soda

"          "             ginger

Little salt  -  flour to roll

Not too stiff  -  roll very thin

       moderate oven

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, andiesenji said:

Quite a few years ago I posted my method of making candied or crystallized ginger.  I grew my own because here in the California high desert we have a very long growing season and with sufficient mulching, with more than a foot of straw topped by a tarp to protect against too much water during the winter rainy season, it can be overwintered in the ground.

I don't cook as much as I used to because of age and infirmity but I still make small batches of the ginger from rhizomes purchased at a local Asian market, which has much larger pieces.

An odd coincidence, today I am preparing a carrot ginger soup.  I grated the ginger last evening and prepped the carrots before I sat down at the computer.

I would be interested in a good recipe for candied ginger.  I use it in my Holiday recipes.  The cost to buy a small bottle in the spice section is terribly expensive so I would gladly make it at home.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A local friend of mine saw that I was doing this Ginger Cook-Off and she sent me this photo of "ginger flower torch."  She's from Malaysia and they use it curry and laksa. Apparently it's called a torch due to the vivid reddish pink color at the end of the flower.

Ginger flower torch.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, kayb said:

Ahh, ginger. I love it. I use it copiously when I do pseudo-Asian stirfries, cucumber salads, and poke. H'mm. I have frozen tuna and frozen edamame. I may have to make poke tonight. 

 

I can take or leave gingerbread. But this recipe for bacon fat gingersnaps is one of the best cookies I've ever eaten in my life. I don't cook them as dark as they recommend; I prefer the chewy to the crispy in this application.

 

My mom's gingerbread recipe used bacon fat, as well.

  • Like 2

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fresh ginger is always in my fridge. I use it several times a week, typically in stir fry. The first order of business before every stir fry is to make an oil flavored with ginger, garlic and chile, enough for whatever needs a turn in the wok. Yesterday we had one of my favorite splurge meals: Ahi tuna burgers. They have fresh ginger in them, among a few other things, and get cooked so the middle is barely warm. Pricey, if you buy the best quality sushi tuna, but then local wild caught fresh fish isn't exactly cheap around here.

 

For coughs I find lemon ginger tea with honey is just the ticket. Fresh grated ginger, generous amount of lemon, add boiling water and stir. Add honey to taste. I like it pretty tart and never measure the juice, so the amount of honey varies as needed. Honestly I have no idea which does the heavy lifting--the honey, the ginger or the lemon.

 

I do like gingerbread cake, but with some caveats. Many recipes just aren't very good and I'm often disappointed when served it. One issue is that  I'm not too fond of molasses. I prefer using Steen's syrup. My favorite gingerbread however is Laurie Colwin's classic Damp Gingerbread, which uses Golden Syrup instead of molasses. It does not use fresh ginger, and I've learned that stale ginger powder is worthless. It's one of those shelf spices that needs to be refreshed frequently, and damp gingerbread really needs very fresh powder. It is a terrific recipe, and lends itself to all kinds of go-withs. Lemon sauce, ice cream (vanilla, salted caramel, coffee, peppermint, green tea or buttermilk ice cream!)  and very yummy: creme fraiche with some fresh lemon zest, aged for a few hours.

 

And yes, I have a recipe floating around somewhere for ginger bread cookies make with bacon fat. Haven't tried it, since I don't often have bacon fat sitting around, but now I'm thinking.....soon!

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When very young fresh ginger is in the markets I like to do the very thinly sliced pickled ginger using Barbara Tropp's recipe in China Moon. It turns a delicate pink color and puts me off the generic "sushi ginger". One of my farmers markets started carrying fresh ginger stalks -beautiful right  green. Vendor says people juice/press it like sugar cane. 

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, heidih said:

When very young fresh ginger is in the markets I like to do the very thinly sliced pickled ginger using Barbara Tropp's recipe in China Moon. It turns a delicate pink color and puts me off the generic "sushi ginger". One of my farmers markets started carrying fresh ginger stalks -beautiful right  green. Vendor says people juice/press it like sugar cane. 

 

A Japanese Chef once said that we should never buy the cheap stuff that's pawned off in the market as "sushi pickled ginger."  He basically would be agreeing with what you've said-it's just sliced ginger with food coloring a little vinegar dripped into the mix.  Not really a true pickle.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Candied or Crystallized Ginger 

I used to make this in very large batches, I used an electric roaster, one that had belonged to my grandmother, purchased in the late '40s and the only change was a new power cord replaced in the late '80s.
229908681_candiedgingercopy.jpg.5cb4b035b757fe68f78c927fd0cd7248.jpg

Following is my recipe for candied ginger.  It took me years to develop this method I know it seems long and complicated but that is because I went into some details because not everyone has some of the knowledge.

The real "secret" is the steaming of the sliced MATURE ginger to get it tender enough to make it palatable. 
I know it seems long and complicated, but the end result makes up for the time expended.
It is the steaming that makes all the difference. I have a large couscouserie that allows me to steam big batches at a time, but anything, even small stacked bamboo steamers work just fine.

I use it in cooking a great deal. Apricot/Ginger scones are a favorite.
I also make ginger ice cream – 1/2 cup of finely chopped ginger added to
a regular batch of vanilla – I actually simmer it in the milk/cream
mixture for a few minutes.
You can also use the syrup in which the ginger is cooked, in or over ice
cream, in fruit salads. I beat it into sour cream (Daisy or Alta-Dena
because they are thicker) to make a dipping sauce for strawberries.
Sweetened sour cream is so much more flavorful than whipped cream in my
estimation. The contrasting flavors are superb. It is also a lovely addition to marinades for chicken, duck, pork and lamb.

I am not going to give exact amounts for the ginger because you may wish to begin with a small amount and work up to larger quantities once you learn how easy it is to produce a delicacy that is far superior to any commercially produced product.

Ingredients to begin: Fresh Ginger root, sugar, water and 7-Up or similar citrus soda or you can add citric acid to the water (1 teaspoon per quart) to make it acidulated.

General preparation: You will need a way to slice the ginger.
A sharp knife is o.k. for small batches.
For larger batches use a V-slicer or mandolin or other method, see below.

Also you will need a steamer, and you should have a crock pot (preferred method) or an enamel, glass or stainless steel cook pot.
You will need a wire rack on which to drain the candied ginger and allow it to dry – this may take up to 3 days depending on humidity.

Choose roots that are fairly large as they are easier to peel.
Break off all the smaller “buds” and store in a plastic bag in the fridge – these can be used for pastes, grated, etc.
Peel the ginger with a vegetable peeler or you can use the rounded end of a spoon and scrape the skin off. Blanching will make this even easier.

Drop the root sections into a solution of 1/2 water and 1/2 7-Up or similar citrus beverage or acidulated water until you have all the pieces peeled.

If you have a mandolin or other adjustable slicer, set it to 1/8 inch and slice all the pieces, CROSSWISE or on a diagonal to obtain the largest slices possible (You can also use a rotary slicer, powered or hand-held, use the medium attachment or use a slicing blade on a food processor). However you want to be sure that you cut across the fibers that run lengthwise in the rhizomes.

Return the slices to the liquid until you are finished slicing all the ginger and are ready to proceed to the next step.

Drain the ginger and make stacks of the slices and place the slices on edge in a perforated steamer tray or flat colander so the bottom is solidly covered – then do the same with a second layer and a third if necessary. If there are a few loose slices on top they may lay flat.

Place the steamer over simmering water, cover and steam for 30 to 40 minutes – or until the ginger is quite tender.
Older, larger, more fibrous roots may require an additional 10 to 20 minutes. (This is the “secret” of tender, moist candied ginger which is ideal for eating, cooking, baking).

Remove a slice from the steamer, allow it to cool a bit and “taste” it, that is, bite into it to see if it is tender. If it resists, steam it some more.

In a crockpot prepare a “light” simple syrup. For each cup of sliced ginger you will need 1 cup water and 1 1/2 cups sugar. (Regular simple syrup is 2 parts sugar to 1 part water, i.e., 2 cups sugar dissolved in 1 cup water)
If you do not have a crockpot or slow-cooker, be prepared to keep an eye on the ginger to make sure the liquid does not boil away and there is enough liquid to cover the ginger.
Bring the sugar/water mixture to a boil – crockpot set on high. Add the ginger, when the liquid again comes to a boil, reduce heat to “Low” then cover and allow to simmer gently for 6 to 8 hours, stirring occasionally and adding additional “syrup” if needed to keep ginger covered.
Note: If you are cooking on a stovetop, you may turn it off, leave at room temperature (covered) and resume cooking later. It is the total time of cooking that counts.
After 6 hours, remove a couple of slices, allow to drain and cool completely – the ginger will be very sticky at this point.
Taste and test the tenderness. The ginger should be very tender and slightly translucent, if it is still a bit too “al dente” or it is totally opaque, continue simmering – test again after an additional 2 to 4 hours.

(Note that if you run short on time at any point in the process, you can turn off the heat and allow the ginger slices to steep in the syrup for a couple of days. There is no need to refrigerate.
When ready to resume just bring the syrup to a boil, reduce to a simmer and finish cooking.)

Allow to cool for 30 to 40 minutes, it should still be warm but not hot enough to burn. Using a skimmer or tongs, remove the slices from syrup and place on a wire rack over a tray or sheet pan so the slices do not overlap.

Strain the remaining syrup into a jar and save. This is now ginger flavored and
may be used in cooking, in drinks, fruit salads, etc.

Allow the ginger slices to dry on the rack until just “tacky” – it
should feel just slightly tacky but should not stick to a finger pressed
onto a slice then lifted.
Place 1/2 cup of regular granulated sugar (or the coarser sanding sugar if you can find it) into a shallow 1 quart covered plastic container. (Tupperware,
Rubbermaid, etc.)
Drop several ginger slices into the container, cover and shake to be
sure the slices are well sugared. Place on a clean rack.
Continue until all the slices have been sugared, adding more sugar as
needed.
Leave the slices on the rack overnight, depending on humidity. If you
are in an area of high humidity, you may want to use a fan to speed up
the final drying time.
If you have a dehydrator use it, or you can use your oven if you have one with a standing pilot light.

Test by squeezing 2 slices together. If they do not stick together you
may now place them in airtight containers (screw or snap-top glass jars,
food storage containers – do not use re-closable plastic bags).

Ginger prepared in this manner will keep indefinitely. If it does dry
out after a time, do not discard, simply chop finely and use in cooking
or baking.
Or you can dry it in a very low oven and grind to a fine powder in a spice grinder.
I prepare candied ginger in very large amounts and cook it in a
40-year-old Westinghouse electric roaster. For smaller batches I use a 6 quart
crockpot. One of my neighbors uses a 2-quart crockpot to cook 1 or 2
cups of ginger. A friend who has a 1950s electric stove uses the
“deep-well” cooker built into that stove. You may find something else
that works for you. The trick is the long, slow simmering and of course
the initial steaming which tenderizes the ginger without extracting too
much of the flavor which happens with parboiling, which is the usual process.

You can use the ginger syrup in many ways, including candying fruit or citrus peel and if cooked long enough, to the hard crack stage, make hard candies which can be tinted with food coloring, dropped by teaspoon onto a Silpat sheet to make candy “drops.”

 

 

 

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1
  • Delicious 2

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our sixth Cook-Off, we're going to be making pad thai. You've surely eaten this Thai restaurant staple dozens of times, marvelling at the sweet, sour, hot, and salty marriage on your plate. There are lots of variations of pad thai floating around the internet, including one by mamster at the eGCI Thai Cooking course. While there is one ingredient -- rice noodles -- that may be hard for some to find, most ingredients or substitutes are available at your local grocer. And, if you're new to Thai cooking, isn't now a good time to get your first bottle of fish sauce or block of tamarind?
      In addition to the course, here are a few threads to get us started:
      The excellent Thai cooking at home thread discusses pad thai in several spots.
      A brief thread on making pad thai, and one on vegetarian pad thai.
      For the adventurous, here is a thread on making fresh rice noodles.
      Finally, a few folks mention pad thai in the "Culinary Nemesis" thread. Fifi, snowangel, and Susan in FL all mention in the fried chicken thread that pad thai is also a culinary nemesis of theirs. So, in true cook-off style, hopefully we can all share some tips, insights, recipes, and photos of the results!
      I'll start by asking: does anyone know any good mail-order purveyors for folks who can't purchase rice noodles at their local Asian food store?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our thirteenth Cook-Off, we're making fresh and stuffed Italian pastas, including gnocchi. I would take a bit here and try to say some intelligent things about pasta in general, but I'm very happy to defer to my betters in the eGullet Society's Culinary Institute! Check out Adam Balic's Pasta around the Mediterranean course here, and click here for and the associated Q&A thread. In addition, Moby Pomerance has three eGCI courses: the first on stuffed pastas in general (Q&A here), and the other two on Tortelli, Ravioli & Cappelletti and Pansotti, Tortelloni and Raviolo.
      Of course, there are also lots of other related threads, including several on gnocchi like this one, this one, and this one; a few fresh pasta threads here, here and here; and a thread on pasta machines.
      So break out your Atlas hand-cranked machine (or, if you're like me, start to justify buying that KitchenAid mixer pasta attachment!), dice up a few heirloom tomatoes, and start cooking! No machine? Then you're on tap for gnocchi, my friend!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Welcome to eGullet Cook-Off XLIV! Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      We've just devoted a Cook-Off to braised brisket, and we're turning again to moist, well-cooked proteins for our next adventure: ossobuco. You will see it spelled a number of different ways out there, but Marcella Hazan refers to it as one word in her definitive Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, so I'm going with that spelling. No reason to argue with Marcella, after all.
      Ossobuco is braised veal shank, named after the "bone with a hole" that used to be attached to the hind shank of a calf. (Let's all agree to stick to veal, and not have, say, halibut ossobuco. ) The classic Milanese version includes vegetables, tomatoes, wine, and broth, and is served with risotto alla milanese, perfumed with saffron, and with gremolada.
      Some of the versions out there are a bit wacky. In particular, The Silver Spoon Cookbook simmers the 2" thick shanks for 30 minutes atop the stove. Given that Hazan has 1 1/2" shanks in a 350F oven for two hours, I'm pretty sure the SSC is a waste of good veal. Indeed, I'd think that a much lower oven for longer would work wonders.
      There are more things to talk about here than just braising temps and times! For example, many other versions of ossobuco depart from the Milanese approach. In her out-of-print More Classic Italian Cooking, Hazan provides the recipe for Ossobuchi in Bianco, the white referring to a sauce lacking tomato. In The Fine Art of Italian Cooking, Giuliano Bugialli offers ossobuco Florentine style, with peas and pancetta, and Lynne Rossetto Kasper's Italian Country Table offers a home-style version with mushrooms, favas or snap peas, and more intense flavors such as anchovy, sage, and rosemary.
      We have one short discussion of ossobuco here, and an even shorter one on wine pairings here. Indeed, as is often the case with Italian food, the best discussion is the one shepherded by Kevin72, the Cooking and Cuisine of Lombardia, which muses on on the dish's origins and execution throughout.
      I'm wondering a few things myself. Some folks say that braised veal cannot be reheated, unlike other dishes that benefit from a night in the fridge. I'm also wondering what other sorts of sides -- polenta, say, or the Italian mashed potatoes that Hazan suggests for the ossobuchi in bianco -- would work and/or are traditional.
      So who wants to welcome the new year with some bones with holes?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our third Cook-Off, we've chosen Indian lamb curry. Yes, it's true: that's a huge category for a cook-off, and saying "Indian" is about as stupidly broad as saying "American." However, like gumbo, there are some basic elements to most of the many, many permutations of this dish, and several cook-off participants wanted to start cooking Indian at home with several options.
      So, instead of choosing a specific lamb curry, I thought that having a conversation about those different permutations (like the gumbo okra/roux discussion, say) would be interesting and fun. I also wanted to avoid too particular ingredients that some of our cook-off pals can't get in certain places.
      A few things that we can discuss, photograph, and share include:
      -- the spice mixture: If you've never toasted your own spices, then you have a world of aromatic wonder ahead. I'm sure many people can share their ingredients, ratios, and toasting tips for curry powders that will blow away the garbage in your grocery's "spice" aisle. We can also have the ground vs. whole debate, if there are takers!
      -- the paste: many curry dishes involve frying a blended paste of onion, garlic, and/or ginger, along with the spices, in oil or ghee (clarified butter). I found that learning how to cook that paste -- which requires the same sort of patience demanded by roux -- was the key to making a deep, rich curry.
      -- accompaniments: rice dishes or bread (I have a pretty good naan recipe that I'd be glad to try out again).
      Here are a couple of related eGullet threads:
      lamb kangari
      a lamb and goat thread
      If anyone finds more, post 'em!
      So: find yourself a leg of lamb to bone, sharpen your knives, and get ready to update your spice drawer!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Welcome to the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off! Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      This cook-off focuses on felafel. I've enjoyed fine felafel here in the US and overseas, but I have literally no idea how to make this, the national street food of at least a handful of Middle Eastern countries. Several people who have recommended this cook-off did so because, while they felt they had some clues, they didn't really have a consistently successful recipe or method. Sounds like a good cook-off topic, eh?
      There are a few topics on the felafel matter, including this one on tips and tricks, an older topic that finds more woes than techniques, and this preparation topic, How Do You Like Your Falafel? I also found this recipe by Joan Nathan, which seems like it might be useful.
      But what do I know? Not much, I'll tell you. Time to chime in, you!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...