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Keeping Cooked Phyllo Crisp


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I made spanikopita the other day, and it was delicious. The top layers of phyllo were crisp and flaky, just the way I remember the dish from the last time I had it. I stored the leftovers in the refrigerator, covered. The next day they still tasted good, but the crisp top layers had turned soggy. 

 

This got me to thinking about other dishes that use phyllo: baklava, for instance. Surely it hasn't been made fresh that day, every time I've eaten it. Why does the crust stay crisp?

 

How should I have stored that spanikopita? Since it has cooked egg in the filling I wanted it refrigerated, and the cookbook said to do so. More broadly, how does one store phyllo-based pastries to keep them crisp? Finally: once cooked phyllo has gone soggy, is there a way to make it crisp again?

 

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I must be leaving mine out or something and not covering until cold???  I always put it into the fridge before freezing it and I would cover it for that.  I invariably make two Spanakopitas at the same time so at least one of them gets frozen.  In fact, I've both a Moussaka and a Spanakopita in the freezer as we speak.   However, the phyllo has always crisped up when heated in the oven...so far...  I hope my boastful words do not anger the Olympian gods...

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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1 hour ago, Darienne said:

  I hope my boastful words do not anger the Olympian gods...

 

So do I! :D 

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I will echo Darienne. If you trap any steam esp from the spinach things go soft side. The baklava I don't even cover. This year I kept it in the dead large built in microwave for over a week (ant issues). Then froze. Still crispy. I snagged a piece last night.

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Whenever we re-warm ours, we flip the pieces over so that the bottom gets crispy again. It will always somewhat soften and eventually get soggy because of the moisture. I don't know anything to prevent it.  We have found over the many years of making Spanakopita, that the thinner the filing, the better the bottom will brown and get really crispy. We always makes two, because my step-dad's recipe worked perfectly with the big bag of Costco spinach. 

Edited by RWood (log)
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Thanks, all of you! I'll know what to do next time, and maybe the texture on this one can be saved.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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