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White Pan Bread Help


KaffeeKlatsch
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Good afternoon,

 

Hoping for some help with a bread recipe. We're working with a white pan bread recipe from RBA for an upcoming competition. We have made many varieties of bread without issue, but keep running into problems with this recipe. We're baking it to an internal temperature of 200, but the very center is still stretchy and dough like. The outside is a golden brown and does not need any more color. During the competition, we will not be able to adjust the oven temperature so we can't in practice either. Any advice is greatly appreciated.

 

 

 

 

Raw material

LB

OZ

Bakers%

Instructions

Yeast - instant

 

0.375 (11 g)

1.66

Mix with flour

Water

 

15.5

64

Straight dough mixing method

Bread Flour

1

  8.5

100

Salt

 

0.55 (15.5 g)

2.25

Sugar, granulated

 

1.25

5

Milk powder

 

1.25

5

 

Shortening, all purpose

 

0.75 (21.25 g)

3

 

TOTAL 2 12


 

    1. Dough temperature: Between 75 and 80 degrees. (Watch your temperatures).  Allow dough to rise, dough should double in size.

 

    1. Cut into proper size pieces, round the piece of dough up and let rest. DO NOT USE PROOF BOX –Keep dough at room temperature, covered

 

    1. Make Up:

1pan loaf, scale 16 oz to achieve finished weight of 14 oz, 

1three-braided loaves – scale to 16 oz – finished weight 14 oz

With remaining dough prepare 6 each, 2 ounce, single knot rolls.

 

    1. Proof to proper size.

    2. Egg wash(1 egg + 1 Tablespoon water)

    3. Bake:  400 degrees.


 

Display:  One standard pan loaf, one braided loaf, and six knot rolls.

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I always bake my white bread at 425 degrees f for 28-32 minutes

.  Have you tried different temperatures?  Also, can you test competition oven for accurate temperature? I know nothing about bread competition... just my thoughts.

Edited by Isabelle Prescott
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Not sure I can help you here, but when I bake loaf type of bread, like a semolina loaf, I bake at 350 for 40 minutes. 

Just for an example here is a link to KAF recipe for white sandwich bread. They have a pretty good selection of recipes and also the blog is very useful. 

https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/king-arthurs-classic-white-sandwich-bread-recipe

 

Hope you find the solution and good luck!

Vanessa

 

Edited by Desiderio (log)

Vanessa

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1 hour ago, Desiderio said:

Hi Isabelle,

 

Not sure I can help you here, but when I bake loaf type of bread, like a semolina loaf, I bake at 350 for 40 minutes. 

Just for an example here is a link to KAF recipe for white sandwich bread. They have a pretty good selection of recipes and also the blog is very useful. 

https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/king-arthurs-classic-white-sandwich-bread-recipe

 

Hope you find the solution and good luck!

Vanessa

 

I was not the person asking the question.  I was trying to give KaffeeKlatch an idea of how I bake my white bread.  I've been baking at 425 for over 50 years and it turns out great at 28-30 minutes.  

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I bake pan breads to 210°  and bang them out of the pans as soon as they come out of the oven because I have found that heat persists for LESS time than open-baked loaves with THICKER crusts.

 I bake "open" loaves on sheet pans or baking stones to 200° because (measured with probes left in the loaves) because the thicker crusts retains heat longer.

 

I learned that in baking school (Dunwoodie) in 1956 and nothing has changed since then as far as I know. And we didn't have digital thermometers with probes back then.

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