Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
gfron1

Resources at Harvard for history & food

Recommended Posts

One of my restaurant's history interns was awarded a grant to study at Harvard during his spring break in February. He has a few leads for their food archive, but I'm wondering with the expertise and breadth of knowledge here if anyone knows of any professors or other resources that he could reach out/plan for on his visit. 

 

So much to share with my friends here...so little time...but I will as I'm able in the Bulrush thread

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's Russ Cohen 

 

Quote

On a walk through woods, fields or conservation land, Russ Cohen sees edible food where the rest of us might only see bushes and greenery. He finds wild plums and grapes; hazelnuts and chestnuts; wild parsnips and watercress; even some fruits and greens most people have never heard of, like toothwort—a root with a horseradish flavor—or nannyberry, a prune-like fruit that ripens in September.

 

If you’ve ever foraged for wild foods in and around Boston or signed up for an edible plants walk, you most likely know the name Russ Cohen. He is the area’s leading wild edibles expert, and has led weekend and seasonal walks throughout Massachusetts and New England for the past 45 years.    

 

  • Like 1

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My friend the retired librarian has a son who guest lectures there (landscape architecture) I'll ask her what buzz/key words to use or departments to check. Cool!!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So Hazel's  reply:   I'm a bit nonplussed.  What does he mean by a food archive?  If it were some special collection of documents in their library system, I would suggest he search https://library.harvard.edu.  Otherwise, I would see where the leads he already has take him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is only peripherally related, but if he (or anyone else) should be in the vicinity of Ann Arbor, there's the Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive.

 

Quote

Containing more than 25,000 items including ephemera publications, it paints a rich and unique portrait of American life over the centuries. In the context of the collection, American culinary history is defined broadly to include both influences upon American foodways and the influence of American culinary practices elsewhere. 

 


Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, heidih said:

So Hazel's  reply:   I'm a bit nonplussed.  What does he mean by a food archive?  If it were some special collection of documents in their library system, I would suggest he search https://library.harvard.edu.  Otherwise, I would see where the leads he already has take him.

This response doesn't surprise me. We hear something similar all the time, and in part, its because no one has done quite what we're doing. I think for my intern, I'm hoping to help him craft a more powerful week than just some time in a library. I really want to make some connections with faculty and staff that might have a more lasting impact.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My experience at USC is that the library staff is extraordinary. So much is in their online inhouse sources - not hunched in the library (though I love tree books) .  Also connection with volunteer wiki people. She is oddly a middle age law wiki archivist. Ya never know until you try. Also  and perhaps you already have - crafting a succinct document of your goal is helpful so you do not get scattershot stuff (like this!) I agree a great opportunity must be crafted. to maximize the brief time the intern has.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Didn't Harvard do a food science MOOC?  I recall some eG people mentioning it a few years back. Was through one of of the MOOC clearinghouses that wasn't Coursera... EDX or something like that. Don't remember exactly.  But it was Harvard faculty doing sciency stuff centered on food.  Figuring who was behind that would be a good lead  to send an inquiry about what faculty have a academic/culinary bent... 

 

edited to add link to the old eG thread: 

 

another edit to add that I recalled someplace had a food/anthropology grad program... but it was NYU, not Harvard... NYC isn't exactly convenient to Boston for a daytrip unless you're well motivated and well funded. . 


Edited by cdh (log)
  • Like 3

Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, cdh said:

Didn't Harvard do a food science MOOC?  I recall some eG people mentioning it a few years back. Was through one of of the MOOC clearinghouses that wasn't Coursera... EDX or something like that. Don't remember exactly.  But it was Harvard faculty doing sciency stuff centered on food.  Figuring who was behind that would be a good lead  to send an inquiry about what faculty have a academic/culinary bent... 

 

 

 

Yes, I was going to suggest pinging Dave Arnold, who was involved in that HarvardX class.  Obviously, he's not at Harvard but he was involved in that and might have some connections to suggest.  Seems to be pretty responsive via Twitter. 

Here's a link that includes the lecturers and schedule from one of the iterations of the course. 

 


Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another angle of approach might be to think of special collections in the library, e.g. when somebody's estate gives all their papers to Harvard.  Perhaps there are food people in that mix.  Julia Child lived down the street for a good while, did her estate drop her stuff on Harvard or someplace else?  Going through my own attic turned up food stuff from my grandparents and great grandparents...  menus, promotional postcards for restaurants in the 1920s, matchbooks, etc.  People not in the food biz kept that kind of stuff...  Does the Harvard library have a special annex for that stuff (like the Harry Ransom Center at UT Austin), or is it all under one roof and administration there?

 

So it does look like some Julia Child stuff landed at Harvard: https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/schlesinger-library/collection/julia-child


Edited by cdh (log)
  • Like 1

Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK upon re-reading intern doesn't have a long time there. I would look to the authors, email, social media if applicable,and try to correspond. Probably a 1 in 70 chance but it gets you In the game. From a research perspective look at general first from the link and then dial down. The time frame is not ideal but foot in the door can often yield interesting connections..https://guides.library.harvard.edu/c.php?g=311003&p=2081838  He or she had enough writing skill to get the grant so hone the research/connection skills and go for it :)  Passion for a subject can pry open sticky doors. IMPORTANT - of not already done get a pass code to access the online library. Should be at least temp access if grant processed. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...