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Still have my house half a construction site 😬, luckily dinner can be easy and still great at the same time. I hope they can finish by  next week 🤪

 

2 spiny lobster (head went straight to the freezer for soup) and some swordfish fresh from today and a piece of tuna that we didn’t cook at lunch. Tuscan kale, sauté zucchini and chickpeas, plus a little bit of bread. 

 

 

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Edited by Franci (log)
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Enjoyed a single rib roast beef last night, with McCormick Green Peppercorn gravy. Enough leftover for lunch in a salad.
 

                                                                           2059914984_Primeribgreenpepercorngravy2601.jpg.b32e3b08f62bef05151c7e830c8f3832.jpg

 

Went thru' my old recipes from our restaurant, and made Toisan Spareribs, named for no other reason than for the county we immigrated from.

Used to make these as a change on our buffet from the usual Sweet & Sour Ribs. These were dusted with cornstarch, deep fried, then simmered in a mixture of water, vinegar, sugar, ketsup, and Worcestershire sauce. The latter gave it a nice punch along with the sweet and tang.

 

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Don't often find Choy Sum in the supermarket here. The local Chinese grocery brought them in this week, and I grabbed a couple of bundles. Just a quick stir-fry with ginger and garlic.

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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1 hour ago, Franci said:

Still have my house half a construction site 😬, luckily dinner can be easy and still great at the same time. I hope they can finish by  next week 🤪

 

2 spiny lobster (head went straight to the freezer for soup) and some swordfish fresh from today and a piece of tuna that we didn’t cook at lunch. Tuscan kale, sauté zucchini and chickpeas, plus a little bit of bread. 

 

 

 

 

Those lobsters look amazing!
I have never cooked tuna! I did pick some up the other day, albeit onloy frozen steaks. I will try later, perhaps grilled like yours? or quick pan-seared? Hubby will probably not eat it if semi-cooked, but we'll see

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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3 hours ago, heidih said:

 

That makes sense. I may play again. What do the kids call it ? nooch?

 

yep, or at least that's what Bad Manners Kitchen calls it.

 

I've used it on veggies, in sauce making, and also in home-made seitan too. 

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On 11/17/2020 at 8:27 AM, Smithy said:

 

Your scallop dishes always look delightful. I love scallops, but my attempts at cooking them have never resulted in that beautiful brown crust unless they also turned rubbery and tough. Is it technique, or availability of very fresh scallops? Probably a bit of both.

 

I pat them dry then use a very hot cast iron skillet, and like others have said only flip them once.  The scallops are very fresh too, which helps.

 

Last night, coconut curry fish (pollock, which is my least favorite fish that I get in my fish share.  In this preparation it was OK).  with tomatoes and spinach, rice and naan

 

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11 hours ago, Dejah said:

Those lobsters look amazing!
I have never cooked tuna! I did pick some up the other day, albeit onloy frozen steaks. I will try later, perhaps grilled like yours? or quick pan-seared? Hubby will probably not eat it if semi-cooked, but we'll see


thank you, @Dejah😊 this tuna was frozen, bought from the supermarket. I think the fresh tuna is really superior but the frozen tuna can be decent. I found huge differences in the frozen tuna quality. Costco tuna is generally good. I just sear it in a very hot pan or grill pan. Recently I have been into Maangchi seasoning sauce, very easy to make and that is what’s on the tuna in the picture. If your husband doesn’t like it raw, you can try a Sicilian recipe. When is still semi frozen you slicenthe tuna very thin, a little thicker than carpaccio style. Place the slices in 2 sheets of parchment paper and pound with the sides of a chinese clever to make larger slices. Prepare a filling with sauté shallots, pine nuts, raisins and panko, then add a hanful of grated parmigiano. Put a little bit of filling and roll, using some plastic wrap to make it easier if necessary. Bread the outside with panko and secure the roll with a toothpick and then you can either deep fry for 90 seconds or pass them  under a hot broiler. Change the filling to your liking if doesn’t suit you. You can also cube it and use it for a super quick pasta or noodle sauce 

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16 hours ago, patti said:

Catfish with lemon and dill. Cherry tomatoes cooked with the catfish and spooned over avocado. 
 

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What an absolutely delightful looking/sounding dish! I would have never thought of it. Thanks!

 

46 minutes ago, Franci said:


thank you, @Dejah😊 this tuna was frozen, bought from the supermarket. I think the fresh tuna is really superior but the frozen tuna can be decent. I found huge differences in the frozen tuna quality. Costco tuna is generally good. I just sear it in a very hot pan or grill pan. Recently I have been into Maangchi seasoning sauce, very easy to make and that is what’s on the tuna in the picture. If your husband doesn’t like it raw, you can try a Sicilian recipe. When is still semi frozen you slicenthe tuna very thin, a little thicker than carpaccio style. Place the slices in 2 sheets of parchment paper and pound with the sides of a chinese clever to make larger slices. Prepare a filling with sauté shallots, pine nuts, raisins and panko, then add a hanful of grated parmigiano. Put a little bit of filling and roll, using some plastic wrap to make it easier if necessary. Bread the outside with panko and secure the roll with a toothpick and then you can either deep fry for 90 seconds or pass them  under a hot broiler. Change the filling to your liking if doesn’t suit you. You can also cube it and use it for a super quick pasta or noodle sauce 

 

That's a neat-sounding idea! I have a single frozen tuna steak in the freezer that was destined for poke. It may go to this treatment instead. Slices maybe 1/4 inch thick?

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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10 minutes ago, kayb said:

 

What an absolutely delightful looking/sounding dish! I would have never thought of it. Thanks!

 

 

That's a neat-sounding idea! I have a single frozen tuna steak in the freezer that was destined for poke. It may go to this treatment instead. Slices maybe 1/4 inch thick?


sound good, then when you pound them they are going to get thinner and larger 👍

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17 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

The "top one" is cut in half, showing the interior (and the bottom, which doesn't need to get the same sear as the top).

 

You can tell the temperature of the interior cooking surface of a pan based on the type of range you have? You're better than me.

 

I am well aware it was cut in half.  However, I only commented as I noted one side was far less done.  Evidently, you do not sear the bottom as you do the top.

 

Not necessarily the ideal method to prepare them (think of a steak for reference).  Were your pan HOT ( ;) ), you can achieve a good crust on each side without overcooking the protein.  At the same time, creating more maillard reaction.

 

"interior cooking surface" - you lost me there!

 

 

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18 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

The "top one" is cut in half, showing the interior (and the bottom, which doesn't need to get the same sear as the top).

 

 

25 minutes ago, TicTac said:

 

I am well aware it was cut in half.  However, I only commented as I noted one side was far less done.  Evidently, you do not sear the bottom as you do the top.

 

...creating more maillard reaction.

 

 

It's my understanding that weinoo (and others) are trying for a balance between the flavors created by maillard reaction and maintaining the exquisite delicacy of a sea-fresh scallop.    Of course, when we are using ordinary product, searing both sides is not criminal.   i.e.., when a scallop is worth eating raw, crust is not the only objective.

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eGullet member #80.

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8 minutes ago, scamhi said:

first night back in FL  poached shrimp with stone crabs mustard sauce.

with a young white burgundy

IMG_3009 2.JPG

 

Beautiful stone crab claws!  I think I can convince myself they are an appropriate treat to order in troubled times ;) Yours are probably fresh and just off the boat; mine will have to be frozen. One adjusts.

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1 minute ago, heidih said:

Beautiful stone crab claws!  I think I can convince myself they are an appropriate treat to order in troubled times ;) Yours are probably fresh and just off the boat; mine will have to be frozen. One adjusts.

these are local and fresh. After the past 2 years of poor seasons due to red tide and storms. We have a good plentiful season again.

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26 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

 

 

It's my understanding that weinoo (and others) are trying for a balance between the flavors created by maillard reaction and maintaining the exquisite delicacy of a sea-fresh scallop.    Of course, when we are using ordinary product, searing both sides is not criminal.   i.e.., when a scallop is worth eating raw, crust is not the only objective.

 

Exactly - trying for a bit of rare in the middle is my goal with these local scallops. Also why I serve them very plain, with only lemon juice and maybe a drizzle of good olive oil.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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57 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

 

 

It's my understanding that weinoo (and others) are trying for a balance between the flavors created by maillard reaction and maintaining the exquisite delicacy of a sea-fresh scallop.    Of course, when we are using ordinary product, searing both sides is not criminal.   i.e.., when a scallop is worth eating raw, crust is not the only objective.

Fair enough. 

 

But I would argue that if you want to enjoy the delicacy of a fresh scallop, eat it raw.

 

If you are cooking it, execute it to its fullest potential.  Once can absolutely achieve a medium to even rare middle if you sear it at a very high heat (on both sides, equally so).

 

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3 minutes ago, TicTac said:

Fair enough. 

 

But I would argue that if you want to enjoy the delicacy of a fresh scallop, eat it raw.

 

If you are cooking it, execute it to its fullest potential.  Once can absolutely achieve a medium to even rare middle if you sear it at a very high heat (on both sides, equally so).

 

 

I can appreciate your execution, as it is the way I usually cook them.   But at the same time I am quite fascinated by the idea of a half and half scallop that celebrates both raw and cooked excellence.   

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Parenthetically, I frequently serve scallops and prawns as part of a more complex dish, like a fish stew.    I give them a blitz sear but leave the center essentially raw, so that when served in a hot liquid or sauce, they come to the table approaching "juste".     Always raves.

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1 hour ago, scamhi said:

first night back in FL  poached shrimp with stone crabs mustard sauce.

with a young white burgundy

IMG_3009 2.JPG

IMG_3014.jpg

That's a great way to celebrate being back in FL!

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1 hour ago, TicTac said:

Fair enough. 

 

But I would argue that if you want to enjoy the delicacy of a fresh scallop, eat it raw.

 

If you are cooking it, execute it to its fullest potential.  Once can absolutely achieve a medium to even rare middle if you sear it at a very high heat (on both sides, equally so).

 

 

Fullest potential? This makes as much sense as saying the only way to enjoy a rib eye or strip steak is blood rare. What if my diners, or I, want it medium? 

 

51 minutes ago, TicTac said:

Back on track - taco Tuesday 


E41E03EF-8376-4418-BA7A-488B689DF7BA.thumb.jpeg.b171ad7b5591d35b50abbec31e5e7bea.jpeg 

excuse the unauthentic orange cheddar!

 

People in glass houses...

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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58 minutes ago, TicTac said:

Back on track - taco Tuesday 

 

excuse the unauthentic orange cheddar!

You did lose me there - but we cook and eat to our own tastes.  Judgement just highlights our own ridiculousness ;)

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