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@Franci  Naples should have some really good grouper and stone crabs. When we stay in the area we go to Goodland (small island off of Marco) for very fresh fish. 
 

I am super jealous. 
 

But beware— it’s the land of Lily Pulitzer and Tory Burch. 

Edited by MetsFan5 (log)
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Tonight was sandwich of sliced chicken breast left over from last night's APO chicken.  Quite pleased with the chicken breast.  Delightful, in fact.  Served with lettuce and mayonnaise on APO toast.  Did I mention I love APO toast?

 

Accompanied by coleslaw and eye of the goat beans.  Coleslaw was great, beans not so much.  They were underdone and salty.  The sandwich though was wonderful, although I sustained two minor injuries:  first I did not remove my index finger quite in time.  Then somewhat later I neglected to remove my tongue from the path of danger.

 

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7 hours ago, Dejah said:

Steamed Pickerel fillets with ginger, green onions, soy sauce, and finished with a drizzle of sizzling hot oil. Had a craving for raw green onions, so loaded it up after steaming.                           

 

This is a fish we don't see too much of.  Is yours caught locally, and then available through retail?

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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7 minutes ago, scamhi said:

chicken tinga last night. I made pickled red onions and forgot to use them.

we had margaritas with this

IMG_7828.JPG

What did you serve this with? tortillas? rice?  Also, do you have a recipe you can recommend?

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10 minutes ago, KennethT said:

What did you serve this with? tortillas? rice?  Also, do you have a recipe you can recommend?

I used the serious eats recipe as a base but only had skinless boneless breasts rather than skin on bone in.

We ate this in bowls and topped with sour cream. Corn torillas would be nice but we didn't have them.

 

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Kuku sabzi in muffin form. Kuku sabzi is a Persian herb frittata, here made with dill, parsley, spring onion, cilantro, tarragon, toasted walnuts, dried cranberries, a few spices such chili, pepper, turmeric and a hint of mace and lemon zest. Also a few cubes of very nontraditional mozzarella, it works in Italian frittatas and in Persian ones just as well :)

Also fire roasted eggplant with strained yogurt, wild blackberries, almonds and rose water. Added some pepper before serving.

Served with simit bread (bought), labneh, Sirene cheese, wine.

 

PXL_20201029_201046525.thumb.jpg.a5bbf3feee0cab3198175b2c70c707ee.jpgPXL_20201027_123732056.thumb.jpg.99a738d2f575257b57fcefc89611bc08.jpgPXL_20201029_201332181.thumb.jpg.aa91a2452955fca1fc7160823b7d7ec8.jpg

 

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~ Shai N.

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17 minutes ago, liamsaunt said:

Cape Cod reuben

 

Looks good to me. I like your use of fish overall as a protein in places not always considered. I think that mindset might get folks off factory chicken and onto sustainble fish?

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6 minutes ago, Duvel said:

Our local supermarket had fresh cod on offer, so I whipped together some fish cakes with homemade tartare sauce and creamed spinach ...

 

 

 Cod - yes! but particularly the spinach. I do not often do it creamed but enjoy it. Your method? It looks so vibrant and "spinachy"

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1 minute ago, heidih said:

 

 Cod - yes! but particularly the spinach. I do not often do it creamed but enjoy it. Your method? It looks so vibrant and "spinachy"


It is very finely chopped spinach with dash of salt, boiled and drained. Then a generous of cream cheese (I use this) is added and done 🤗

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11 minutes ago, Duvel said:

It is very finely chopped spinach with dash of salt, boiled and drained. Then a generous of cream cheese (I use this) is added and done 🤗

Ha! I have never used herbs in mine. That cheese sounds lovely. I thought maybe the cows were eating herby fodder but sounds like added in. I shall play.  Thanks.

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3 minutes ago, heidih said:

Ha! I have never used herbs in mine. That cheese sounds lovely. I thought maybe the cows were eating herby fodder but sounds like added in. I shall play.  Thanks.


This type of cheese is very popular in Germany. We go through 1-2 packs per week, not only as a spread but also as a quite versatile ingredient. A very similar product available in the US is Boursin ...

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52 minutes ago, Duvel said:


This type of cheese is very popular in Germany. We go through 1-2 packs per week, not only as a spread but also as a quite versatile ingredient. A very similar product available in the US is Boursin ...

Yes but I find it overly fake garlic/herb tasting and not much of a milky sweetness. Hardly from the Luberon.  I shall improvise. Thanks. I have emailed a friend who used to work on a goat farm and do cheese in her youth - so so many possibilities if one gets good milk.  I fondly recall the goat milk we would get at the Los Angeles County Fair - milked in front of us. Pre raw milk paranoia. 

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3 hours ago, heidih said:

Looks good to me. I like your use of fish overall as a protein in places not always considered. I think that mindset might get folks off factory chicken and onto sustainble fish?

 

What about off factory chicken and onto good chicken?

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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2 minutes ago, weinoo said:

 

What about off factory chicken and onto good chicken?

No argument on the chx - but $ and availability does factor into purchasing for some. The carbon footprint is different as well ( I know becoming a tired term) Plus opening minds can be overall possibly good. Change is not an enemy - just a potentially unexplored avenue. 

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2 minutes ago, KennethT said:

Going from factory chicken to sustainable fish is like going from a Chevyto a Ferrari...  probably better off going from Chevy to Corvette - which is the sustainable chicken...

And we have one less fisherman to choose from at the farmer's markets!

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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This is the Sauerbraten recipe. It's pretty easy, just takes time over the course of marinading and slow-cooking.  This time I cooked it in a Dutch oven, but the slow-cooker works well too.

German Sauerbrauten with Gingersnap Gravy.JPG

 

For the Marinade-

2 cups red wine

2 cups apple cider vinegar

1 tbsp. whole black peppercorns

1 tbsp. juniper berries, crushed

4 bay leaves

1 tbsp. pickling spices

1/2 tsp. celery seed

1/2 tsp. caraway seed

3 1/2-4 lb. beef chuck roast

2 tbsp. olive oil

salt and black pepper

 

For the Beef-

1 1/2 cups peeled and chopped carrots

1 cup chopped celery

1/2 cup chopped parsley

1 1/2 cups chopped yellow onions

6 cloves garlic, crushed

For the Gingersnap Gravy-

4 cups reserved marinade

10-12 gingersnap cookies

fresh parsley for garnish

fresh rosemary for garnish

 

 

Prepare the Marinade and the Beef-

In a large saucepan, add the red wine, apple cider vinegar, peppercorns, juniper berries, bay leaves, pickling spices, celery seed and caraway seed. Bring to a boil, then take the marinade off the heat and let it cool to room temperature.

Put the beef roast into a deep casserole dish or Dutch oven, then pour enough of the marinade over the beef to come up to the top. Cover and refrigerate the beef. Let the beef marinate for 3 days or up to 5 days, turning it over each day.

 

Slow-Cook the Beef-

Heat the oven to 275. Remove the chuck roast from the marinade. Strain the marinade and use as the braising liquid. Use a kitchen towel and dab the meat to remove any marinade. Season the roast with salt and pepper. Add the olive oil to a large skillet over medium-high heat and add the roast. Sear on all sides until browned, about 4-5 minutes per side.

Add the carrots, celery, parsley, onions and garlic to a heavy Dutch oven. Place the chuck roast on top of the vegetables. Pour in enough marinade over the beef to come up to the top. Cover and cook the beef for 5-6 hours until fork tender.

Gently remove the beef from the Dutch oven and place on a cutting board. Cover with foil to keep warm while you make the gravy.

 

Make the Gingersnap Gravy and serve-

Strain the braising liquid and discard the vegetables. Reduce 4 cups of the braising liquid to 2 cups. Add 10-12 ginger snap cookies and cook until thick, about 3 minutes. Pour the gravy into a blender and pulse to create a thick gravy. Add more ginger snaps if the gravy is too thin. Strain and season with salt and pepper.

Slice or cut the beef roast into chunks and put on a serving platter. Spoon some gingersnap gravy over the top and garnish with fresh parsley and rosemary.

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