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JoNorvelleWalker

Dinner 2020

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@Dejah I also see those "country pork ribs" on sale here in Los Angeles. I think people are not familiar. Our gain :)  Oh and the lamb I have been pleasantly surprised to see the shanks in main stream chains and  reasonably priced. I can always get upscale butcher to order but nice to have them at hand. I posted about the somewhat funny labeling here  https://forums.egullet.org/topic/160212-harvested-meat/

 

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8 minutes ago, heidih said:

@Dejah I also see those "country pork ribs" on sale here in Los Angeles. I think people are not familiar. Our gain :)  Oh and the lamb I have been pleasantly surprised to see the shanks in main stream chains and  reasonably priced. I can always get upscale butcher to order but nice to have them at hand. I posted about the somewhat funny labeling here  https://forums.egullet.org/topic/160212-harvested-meat/

 

I usually find New Zealand or Australian lamb shanks in the freezer section of our supermarket. I prefer them to Canadian lamb - more lamb flavour.


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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27 minutes ago, Dejah said:

I usually find New Zealand or Australian lamb shanks in the freezer section of our supermarket. I prefer them to Canadian lamb - more lamb flavour.

 

The odd thing is if you speak with NZ folks so much is exported they can't afford their own!  This US meat I have gotten is pretty "lamby" I can not cook it when step mom is around - she freaks.  i'll take lamb or goat over beef any day.


Edited by heidih (log)
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@Dejah 

 

I agree with you that county style ribs are fantastic for Char Siu

 

would you be more specific on your Rx and Technique ?

 

yours look perfect.

 

thanks

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dinner last night. pan seared kurabota pork chops with spicy vinegar peppers. sauce made from some liquid from the jar, garlic parsley a little water and butter. sliced and plated with roasted fennel

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10 hours ago, Dejah said:

The marinade was my usual one from my old restaurant: Hoisin sauce, oyster sauce, soy, sesame oil, sugar, and 5-spice powder. Even marinating for 6 hours, the flavour was good!

 

Dejah, that looks sooooo delicious! Could you post the recipe please?

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32 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Served with that old Chinese standby - orzo!

😂

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Well done on the pork.  It is the perfect cut for that treatment.  May I ask what temperature and how long you cook the pork?  Yours look nice and juicy while being a little 'charred' looking on the outside.  Love to make this and keep in small batches in the freezer.


Edited by Okanagancook (log)

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13 hours ago, heidih said:

@blue_dolphin where did you source the chesnut pasta and any cooking tips? I am chesnut nutty! esp after reading David Lebovitz's post on chesnut paste a bit ago.   https://www.davidlebovitz.com/chestnut-puree-creme-de-marrons-clement-faugier/

 

13 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

I bought the pasta at Eataly. The brand is Alta Valle Scrivia. It appears to be 25% chestnut flour and the rest semonlina/durum wheat flour.  It's relatively subtle but there is a nutty/earthy chestnut flavor that comes through.  So far, I've only used it to make a pasta con fungi dish but figured it would work well with the beets so I decided to throw it in here. 

 

I use it this to make subtle and seductive chestnut ice cream which we serve with chestnut liqueur, and a very simple but delicious chestnut pie I was served in the Ardeche, France. 

 

CHESTNUT PIE  (Tarte a la Chataigne, from Chateau de Bessas)

 

1 unbaked pie crust

 

450 gr. creme de chataignes

3 eggs

25 cl creme fraiche

1 - 2 tablespoons liqueur de chataigne

 

Separate eggs and beat whites to stiff

Add remaining ingredients to egg yolks, then gently mix in whites

 

Line tarte or pie pan with pie crust, fill with custard.    Bake in 375°F oven until set.

 

(Creme de chataignes can be replaced by marmelade of plum, fig, peach, apricot, etc.)

 

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On the char siu with country style pork ribs:
My ingredients are as listed. For the 2.4 kg package, I probably used: 1 cup Hoisin sauce, 1/4 cup oyster sauce, splash of soy, Chinese cooking wine, and sesame oil,  1/4 cup sugar, 2 tbsp 5-spice powder, and 1 tbsp red food colouring (optional). Mix well.
I poked the strips of meat with a fork, laid them in a ziplock container and coat each completely. Turn  the meat a couple of times to make sure each is well coated. Sometimes, I put everything in a large ziplock bag for ease of massaging the marinade into the meat!
Heat oven to 400F. Line the bottom tray of a broiler pan with foil. Spray the top pan with Pam (easier to clean after!), and lay the strips down. I cooked these for an hour as they were so close together!  Turn them a couple of times and brush each time with the remaining marinade but not on the last turn (raw meat juice in marinade).
The edges will char but the rest of the meat, depending on how thick they are, will require pretty much the full hour. Brush with honey immediately out of the oven (optional, just my Mom's preference!}
I've tried with higher temps but it smokes up my kitchen!
I used to hang these vertically on the cross piece in my oven so they didn't need to be turned over. Did that too often and it broke.😁
They can also be done in the BBQ and the Big Easy, but it's a bit too chilly at the moment to cook outside!
I keep a batch in the freezer for fried rice, baos, Hot'n'Sour soup, etc. SO handy and much cheaper than buying from a restaurant or BBQ shop (which we don't have in my city)

 


Edited by Dejah (log)
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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Two days before, chicken drumsticks were rubbed with a thick paste made of Hungarian paprika, Spanish smoked paprika, garlic & onion powder, cider vinegar, and a few drops of white wine.
A few hours before, slices of bell peppers, pasillo, and halved cherry tomato were tossed with many chopped garlic cloves in a separate marinade: 1/8-1/2 cup cider vinegar, salt, paprika , smoked paprika and parsley.
The packages were laid out together on a baking sheet, topped with 1/2+ cup shredded creamy Appenzeller cheese. Roasted 400F for 30 minutes
Rancho Gordo Spelt in duck stock in Instant Pot.
Dessert was Instant Pot blueberry bread pudding (using my standard loaf, crusts on) with local honey &/or maple syrup drizzled on top at the table.

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With a storm approaching and the house secured, I felt like comfort food again. And although it is not quite cold enough these days I picked Oden:

 

I made satsuma-age and ganmodoki quite some while ago and froze it for these occasions. The daikon was prepared on Thursday ...

 

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... as were the 6.5 min eggs, that were marinating in the oden broth since then.
 

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Ganmodoki contained Edamame & carrot. The Leberkäse is not a traditional item, but works surprisingly well, both in texture and flavor.

 

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I opened a pack of Shichimi Togarashi I bought on my last trip to Tokyo. The flavor - especially the citrus notes - was outstanding !

 

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Yum !

 

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@Duvel  Nice spread. The first time I saw Leberkaese (warm) at the "Alpine Village Market" I was expecting liver. Instead it tasted like warm bologna or Spam. Does grow on ya. They make theirs in-house. 

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1 hour ago, Dejah said:

On the char siu with country style pork ribs:
My ingredients are as listed. For the 2.4 kg package, I probably used: 1 cup Hoisin sauce, 1/4 cup oyster sauce, splash of soy, Chinese cooking wine, and sesame oil,  1/4 cup sugar, 2 tbsp 5-spice powder, and 1 tbsp red food colouring (optional). Mix well.
I poked the strips of meat with a fork, laid them in a ziplock container and coat each completely. Turn  the meat a couple of times to make sure each is well coated. Sometimes, I put everything in a large ziplock bag for ease of massaging the marinade into the meat!
Heat oven to 400F. Line the bottom tray of a broiler pan with foil. Spray the top pan with Pam (easier to clean after!), and lay the strips down. I cooked these for an hour as they were so close together!  Turn them a couple of times and brush each time with the remaining marinade but not on the last turn (raw meat juice in marinade).
The edges will char but the rest of the meat, depending on how thick they are, will require pretty much the full hour. Brush with honey immediately out of the oven (optional, just my Mom's preference!}
I've tried with higher temps but it smokes up my kitchen!
I used to hang these vertically on the cross piece in my oven so they didn't need to be turned over. Did that too often and it broke.😁
They can also be done in the BBQ and the Big Easy, but it's a bit too chilly at the moment to cook outside!
I keep a batch in the freezer for fried rice, baos, Hot'n'Sour soup, etc. SO handy and much cheaper than buying from a restaurant or BBQ shop (which we don't have in my city)

 

 

I am making these very soon...thanks for taking the time to post the recipe.😍

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Drunken Noodles

 

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Skillet pizza with black olives, pesto, prosciutto, chevre, and mozzarella.

 

85243208_213809079775800_397818923430445056_n.jpg

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More beans, peppers and rice.

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22 hours ago, haresfur said:

 

Looks great. I would love to visit Loretto, a friend has a kayak touring business there. The marine park is a treasure.

Loreto is pleasant, has lots of food options. Local are chill and courteous. Has both mountains and sea, and  is very popular with Canadian and American pensioners, middle-aged tourists, snowbirds (temporary residents) etc.


Edited by BonVivant (log)
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Instant Pot Corned Beef Brisket and Cabbage with Potatoes and Carrots:

 

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Corned Beef, Onion, Celery, Beef Broth and Seasoning Packet at High Pressure for 75 minutes, 20 minutes Natural Release.

 

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Remove the Brisket from the pot and while it rests, cook the cabbage, potatoes and carrots in the cooking liquid for 5 minutes at High Pressure with Quick Release.
 

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Slice the Brisket against the grain and serve with the vegetables.

 

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Edited by robirdstx (log)
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SoleGranville02102020.png

 

Sole Granville.  Recipe from Richard Crausman, French Classics Made Easy.*  Crausman's simplification is to use sole fillets rather than whole sole.  Unfortunately Dover sole was not to be had and I made do with lemon sole.  Jo Norvelle Walker's simplification was to omit the shrimp.  My cruel physician has enjoined me from eating crustaceans.  Though the market had the most beautiful shrimp on offer.  Sad.  And I omitted the truffle.**

 

The fillets are poached in fish stock and plated with sauce allemande.  I have come by a selection of More Than Gourmet sauce reductions.  For the sauce allemande I used the More Than Gourmet Classic Seafood Stock to make up for the missing shrimp.  Then after the sole is poached the reduced fish stock is added to the sauce allemande and bound with a butter swirl.

 

One of the finest dishes I have eaten.  I'm minded why I adore French cuisine and why I so seldom prepare it.  Even with my battery of copper pots.

 

The sole Granville was to be followed by the most beautiful out of season organic asparagus I have ever seen.***  I could not do it.  I just could not.  I did manage to choke down some strawberry ice cream.  All accompanied by methode rotuts.

 

 

*easy is relative.

**just because.

***and priced accordingly.

 

 

 

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The little one requested Bacon & Peas. It is amazing how good something can taste thats just made from bacon, peas, onions & parmesan ...
 

52069173-62CB-46EB-9DA8-FAA89FD214DE.thumb.jpeg.e03a0ebb06dfc27e93146324f0f3e74f.jpeg

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