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5 hours ago, Franci said:

tigelle instead of steamed bread


That looks pretty good, too ...

 

Would you mind sharing your recipe ?

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15 hours ago, Dejah said:

THIS really caught my attention! I assume these were giant meatballs perhaps made from ground Roo meat and not really from a neutered kangaroo!

😁😂 Yes just Kangaroo Meatballs. If I ever post "Bush Oysters" then we're getting into that territory. 

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53 minutes ago, CantCookStillTry said:

Yes just Kangaroo Meatballs.

 

I like me some kangaroo, balled or not. Can't get it here, though I do get stranger things. Pandaburger, anyone?

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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7 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

@dcarch – how long did you SV the lobster tails, ‘cause they aren’t too expensive right now. 

 

Not sure what I had done can be useful for you.

I had steak SV'ing at 129F, I put the frozen lobster tails in the same bath for about 30 minutes. Then I took the steak out and add boiling water to the bath to raise the bath temperature to 135F instantly. 20 minutes later, I put ice cubes in the bath to instantly lower the temperature back to 129F. put the staek back in, SV for 15 minutes. Then both the lobsters and steak are ready for searing and serving at the same time.

 

dcarch

Edited by dcarch (log)
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Now, Chinese restaurants in England (and perhaps where you live) usually call this "Special Fried Rice", a concept unheard of in actual China. I call it "using up leftovers and clearing the fridge/freezer fried rice".

 

Minced chicken breast, shrimp, garlic, ginger, red and white chilies, mushrooms, Malabar spinach, rice, a wing and a prayer. No egg! No soy sauce!

 

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Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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I had so much varied produce in my fridge and spent a good part of yesterday working with it.

In addition to the roasted peppers posted in the Pandemic topic, some other preps included...

 

812376081_Celeriartichokeseggplant10-16.thumb.jpeg.3e9478008e6a7d36008bceb622af5caf.jpeg

 

Céleri Rémoulade - a fine one, as this was a nice, fresh, small celeriac. Dressing was sour cream, Duke's mayo, Dijon, lemon juice, chives.

Baby artichokes sautéed with shallots, garlic, thyme, white wine, chicken stock, pimentón, and a smidge of saffron.

A small eggplant, broiled to not great effect. Still, it was tasty for a not favored vegetable (fruit?).

Roasted red potatoes with thyme.

And a nice hunk of swordfish steak, steam roasted with olive oil and herbs de Provence.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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6 hours ago, Duvel said:


That looks pretty good, too ...

 

Would you mind sharing your recipe ?

 

I’ve seen (and tried) recipes with yeast and baking powder at the same time, with cream as liquid, a mix of milk and water, with oil or lard or a combination. You’ll have a very different result (more similar to piadina than bread for example) also some people prefer them empty inside, with a pocket, some people only get a full crumb. This is maybe not the typical tigella flavour but I like that way: 520g flour, 2% salt, 8-10% extra virgin olive oil, about 260-270 water, yeast depending on your time. I let it raise, divide the dough  into 40g balls (about 21) and since I cook in 3 batches when I get to 7 balls I roll them out with a small pin to fit the holes of the tigelliera and go on so I have the first batch ready (rather than making 21 balls and rolling all of them at the same time). I let them rise again about 20-30 minutes covered. Meanwhile I preheat the tigelliera. Cooking in very fast, about 2-3 minutes on one side, 1-2 minutes on the other. I’ve seen on Amazon.de you have the tigelliera 2 torri, the one with 7 holes is the best for me. I make tigelle once a week for years, I keep them in the freezer and are an amazing snack. My kids love them. 

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1 hour ago, Franci said:

I’ve seen on Amazon.de you have the tigelliera 2 torri, the one with 7 holes is the best for me.


Must ... resist. Aaaaaargh ! I know it will end up in my shopping basket tonight, latest after the Saturday night liquid mood enhancer 😜

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Had some friends over who wanted to learn how to make joongzi / sticky rice in bamboo leaves. Together, we put together 170 packets.

                                                             
                                                                                 296096129_ReducedSO4286.jpg.fc48853f3d03969a6db52c344c8c153e.jpg

 

        Batches of 24 were boiled on a turkey fryer burner outside for 2.5 hours. Some packets were prettier than other, but they all; tasted delicious! 

 

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Used only sticky rice instead of my other combos of long grain jasmine and short grain sweet rice. These were so silky!
Filling was Chinese sausage, mushrooms, dried shrimp, peanuts, salt pork, salted egg yolk. My cousin brought some smoked duck breast and they were great!

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Another cousin made something I've never had before. I think it is a Toisanese / Guangdong type of savoury "cake". Her Mom called it Tay-Tay. It's tapioca and ground pork, then steamed.                                                                               1548421794_ReducedtayTay4296.jpg.6a517748cb7205f9af0b81b345f2652e.jpg

                                                                           

 

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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9 minutes ago, Dejah said:

Had some friends over who wanted to learn how to make joongzi / sticky rice in bamboo leaves. Together, we put together 170 packets.
                                                           
                                                                                

 

        Batches of 24 were boiled on a turkey fryer burner outside for 2.5 hours. Some packets were prettier than other, but they all; tasted delicious! 

 

                                                                                329573819_reducedJoongzipot4297.jpg.89070eb105ca8e7584d62b99bb5ff59d.jpg

Used only sticky rice instead of my other combos of long grain jasmine and short grain sweet rice. These were so silky!
Filling was Chinese sausage, mushrooms, dried shrimp, peanuts, salt pork, salted egg yolk. My cousin brought some smoked duck breast and they were great!

                                                                             1585551971_ReducedJoongzi4295.jpg.ab66100cb5b3cf55a277bb9da8d935ec.jpg

Another cousin made something I've never had before. I think it is a Toisanese / Guangdong type of savoury "cake". Her Mom called it Tay-Tay. It's tapioca and ground pork, then steamed.                                                                              

                                                                           

 

 

Craving the joongzi. I only manage to get them seasonally when there are vast trays at the big Chinese market. Often still warm so the scent draws you in. A treat.

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1 hour ago, Duvel said:


Must ... resist. Aaaaaargh ! I know it will end up in my shopping basket tonight, latest after the Saturday night liquid mood enhancer 😜

 

If you do, don’t feel bad, because I bet you’ll use a lot! This doesn’t belong to my regrets pile 😁 

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Before inevitable succumbing to @Franci’s purchase suggestions, this week I acquired a pressure cooker from the source of all evil (and cheap household appliances). The Amazon Basic pressure cooker does exactly what is needs to do - no frills, no extras - but thanks to Prime day about 25% off.

Never having owned a pressure cooker before, I decided to make stock first. Pho Ga specifically. It worked out nicely. Stock was full bodied and delicately flavored after one hour cooking time. The used meat made a great filler in addition to the minced pork in my Vietnamese spring rolls ... all good !

 

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18FFE830-FEE2-408F-AC6B-BA855070C883.thumb.jpeg.142e174be939cc1025e6ed715d04bda6.jpeg

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17 hours ago, scamhi said:

had a friend over tonight for dinner.

sauteed broccoli with garlic, anchovy and chili flake over a slice of fresh mozz.

Le puy lentils with carrot, garlic, bay leaves, fresh thyme leaves and onion and wild salmon garnished with crispy prosciutto and dijon mustard.

Aligote and Meursault both from 2016

Our friend made an orange scented olive oil cake and sweet milk ice cream

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excellent crust on the fish

17 hours ago, scamhi said:

had a friend over tonight for dinner.

sauteed broccoli with garlic, anchovy and chili flake over a slice of fresh mozz.

Le puy lentils with carrot, garlic, bay leaves, fresh thyme leaves and onion and wild salmon garnished with crispy prosciutto and dijon mustard.

Aligote and Meursault both from 2016

Our friend made an orange scented olive oil cake and sweet milk ice cream

IMG_2658.jpg

IMG_2661.jpg

IMG_2662.jpg

IMG_2663.jpg

IMG_2664.jpg

Excellent sear on the fish.  The puy lentils are something I like to use as a base for fish as well.  Everything looks delicious 

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Kimchi and noodle pancake (a big one!) with lots of scallions, garlic, chili paste, ginger, a few spices. Served with a sauce of sesame paste, sesame oil and rice vinegar.

Cucumber salad with chili, scallions, garlic, rice vinegar, sugar, sesame oil, a bit of fish sauce.

Grilled tteokbokki with sweet and spicy sauce.

 

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~ Shai N.

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50 minutes ago, shain said:

Grilled tteokbokki with sweet and spicy sauce.

 

PXL_20201008_190007208.jpg

 

 

I love the chew of the rice cakes but oddly have never had them grilled. Must try when grill and Korean market access return.  Were they pre simmered or anything or just on grill out of package & glazed?

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26 minutes ago, heidih said:

 

I love the chew of the rice cakes but oddly have never had them grilled. Must try when grill and Korean market access return.  Were they pre simmered or anything or just on grill out of package & glazed?

 

I boiled them in salted water until they were done, then oiled, grilled over high flame, sauced and briefly grilled again. I'm not sure that the second grilling did much, I wanted to carmelize the sauce a bit, but would skip it next time.

Regardless the blanching, I had to make those from scratch and I think they were a bit dry, so commercial ones might be grill ready. We are quite behind when it comes to Asian food and culture around here... I'd be surprised if there's any store in the country selling it at all :(

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~ Shai N.

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47 minutes ago, shain said:

 

I boiled them in salted water until they were done, then oiled, grilled over high flame, sauced and briefly grilled again. I'm not sure that the second grilling did much, I wanted to carmelize the sauce a bit, but would skip it next time.

Regardless the blanching, I had to make those from scratch and I think they were a bit dry, so commercial ones might be grill ready. We are quite behind when it comes to Asian food and culture around here... I'd be surprised if there's any store in the country selling it at all :(

 

I keep them in the freezer to toss into soup as the starch element. They barely need more than a defrost. You made your own! Bravo! @nakji who had taught Korea did them while in Hanoi  https://forums.egullet.org/topic/97326-eg-foodblog-nakji-our-girl-in-hanoi/?do=findComment&comment=1334509

 

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1 hour ago, MokaPot said:

Not sure about the Korean rice cakes (tteokbokki), but you can pan-fry the Japanese rice cakes (mochi). You get a nice, caramelized crust on the "cakes."

 

Thanks. They did brown nicely before I applied the sauce. I then grilled them a second time, which didn't seem to do much.

Maybe a lower heat would result in more browning, but I was afraid of them drying up.

I do love roasted dango/mochi, though I prefer it sweet rather than savory.

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~ Shai N.

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