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Meat Slicers


Chris Amirault
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On Friday, April 28, at 9:32 am, Chris Amirault welcomed into his loving home this magnificent vintage Hobart Meat Slicer, weighing in at well over fifty pounds. Hobart was adopted thanks to the fine folks at craigslist for $100, and he's in good working order. Here's a few photos of the little bugger:

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That's the turkey breast I brined and roasted, sliced nice and thin.

This beast is fantastic. I took it apart -- it's all screws and grease and metal, so I could figure it out more or less -- cleaned it, sharpened the blade, and it's working like a charm. Plus it's absolutely beautiful, don't cha think?

So... what to do with it? I'm planning on curing ham, bresaola, and who knows what, smoking turkey, roasting beef, the usual and I'll slice 'em up with this baby. I'm also thinking about carpaccio at home, something I've craved but never managed to pull off for obvious reasons. What else is there to try?

And does anyone know of any things I should be doing to keep it in good shape other than keeping it clean and sharp?

Finally, I'd love to hear about other people's slicers. What do you do with them? Where do you store them? What do you use them for?

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Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Beautiful, Chris!

But, I'm a bit disappointed that you chose to inaugurate the slicer with somethine roasted, and not cured or smoked...

I'm thinking your Hobart could make fast work of the 6 pounds of cured and ssoked bacon I have on hand...

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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That's a great deal, Chris. I had one of those many years ago and it was old when I got it. It may out live you. I suggest you simply call the Hobart repair shop nearest you and ask them what kind of regular maintenance it needs. They may be able to give you a better idea of the vintage, too.

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She's a beauty Chris.

I have access to a larger but somewhat newer Hobart through a good friend. He procured his from a local butcher who no longer is. Beacause of the size and overall weight, he permanently mounted his on a rolling cart. The cart is similiar to what a mechanic might use in a garage. The height is just about right of a countertop, and clean up becomes much easier by rolling the unit outside for washing and disenfecting.

Use extreme caution around these units.

woodburner

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Finally, I'd love to hear about other people's slicers. What do you do with them? Where do you store them? What do you use them for?

I have a lovely old slicer in my basement waiting for my husband to finish renovations so it can be placed in a useable spot. I inherited it from an butcher friend when he died along with a delicator to tenderize meat and a beautiful huge scimitar. We were friends for years, he taught me to butcher meat in his basement where he had all the gear (and about 5 freezers). As he got older I made him meals, and put them in his freezer so he had a warm meal every day.

When we first met he tested me to see what I would do with different cuts of meat, and when I satisfied him that I knew the difference between beef wellington and pot roast he decided he would take me on as a customer. He went all over southern ontario in those days buying the best beef he could find for his customers. Don't think he ever made any money at it, he did it for the love of the job. He used to give me roasts for birthdays and Christmas (and I'd give him Crown Royal). He was 88 when he died, and I still miss the old bugger.

Anyway, when I get the slicer up and running I will use it to slice all sorts of things. One thing I can't wait to make again is homemade melba toast. Just slice a stale bagette into thin slices, dry for several hours in a low convection over until just starting to colour. Lovely stuff with just a bit of butter.

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Finally, I'd love to hear about other people's slicers. What do you do with them? Where do you store them? What do you use them for?

Wow that is one beautiful machine.

Here is the one that I have. It is made in Italy. I bought this about 12 years ago when we lived in Sault Ste. Marie. A friends husband made the best Italian salami I have ever tasted, and I needed a good slicer so that the salami could be sliced as thin as possible. It got used a lot back then. But for the last 6 or 7 years it only gets used a few times a year. Sometimes I drag it out to shave leftover Prime Rib or tenderloin to make beef dip sandwiches.

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Ann

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Great ideas! I used it today to slice a slab of homemade bacon into uniform thick strips. Then a pal of mine who teaches at Johnson and Wales came by and suggested I think about very thin slices of orange for pastries.

Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Chris

your slicer was manufactured in 1940!

tracey

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

My Webpage

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I emailed Hobart actually :cool:

T

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

My Webpage

garden state motorcyle association

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  • 2 weeks later...

Now that I'm making so much charcuterie, I'm starting to get itchy for paper-thin sliced meat. A home meat slicer seems like a hopeless extravagance, not to mention a counter-space hog. But I know that if anyone would talk me into needing one, it would be you guys. What say you?

And if you vote for getting one, which one?

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Abra, the only reason I slurged and bought a small commercial type slicer was so that I could slice a friends homemade salami paper thin. It was a big splurge. It doesn't get used often but for the times I need it i'm really glad that I have it.

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Edited by Ann_T (log)
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I have a Waring Pro slicer which I haven't had a chance to use yet, but I'll let you know tomorrow how it works!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I have a cheap plastic folding one made by Krups that does a remarkably fine job of slicing both thick and thin. It spins rather slowly and can even be used to get three slices of bread out of one for homemade melba toast.

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Last fall, when we were at a market in Provence, my husband was unable to resist a huge salami. He informed me that this was going to be the most expensive salami ever. "Why", I asked. "You said that the price was very low". "Yes", he replied "but now we are finally forced to buy a slicer". We bought a Chefs Choice model. At first we were worried that it might be too flimsy, but it is very solid, does not slip around on the counter and will slice prosciutto as thinly as any big commercial machine.

We use it even to slice bread when we have a dense loaf that needs to be sliced thinly. I have used it when I want to slice vegetables, such as eggplant, thickly but evenly. We are constantly congratulating each other on our purchase and I think you will not regret it if you buy one. We bought it on Amazon and I think it was about $300.00.

Ruth Friedman

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I'm glad to see I'm not the only one. of course, cheap and folding sound like scary but desireable traits. My counter space is so limited...but I've regretted cheap tools before. Does anyone alse have that Krups? Or should I spring for one of the bigger guys?

Edited by Abra (log)
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Hi Abra,

I bought a non commercial Sunbeam food slicer 6 months ago and absolutely love it. I use it to cut my own slices of boneless ham, salami, tomatoes, cheese, bread and so on. I have a food dehydrator as well so it'd very useful when you need to cut fruit and vegies to the same thickness ready for drying.

http://www.sunbeam.com.au/products/product...d=520&sec_id=61

Smell and taste are in fact but a single composite sense, whose laboratory is the mouth and its chimney the nose. - Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

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I'm glad to see I'm not the only one.  of course, cheap anmd folding sound like scary but desireable traits.  My counter space is so limited...but I've regretted cheap tools before.  Does anyone alse have that Krups?  Or should I spring for one of the bigger guys?

The Waring Pro isn't that big and doesn't take up a lot of counter space. When we used it the other day, we were very pleased with it.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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None. We found it very easy to take the blade out and clean. Once the blade is out, we had no trouble wiping it down and we disinfected with ammonia. Nor was it hard to put back together. It's got suction feet on the bottom, so it was very stable on the granite, didn't move around at all. For what we'll use it for, slicing meats mostly (unlike one reviewer who used it to slice potatoes, for which I would use my mandoline) it's fine. Of course, we've only used it twice now!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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i'll take a picture with more time - but i bought mine for 140EUR - it is very small yet cuts ham wafer thin in a breeze.

i use it almost daily - partly because i always have a few bit of charcuterie in the fridge - at the moment it's bresaola, parma, coppa and hungarian salami. it's a joy...would find it hard living without it.

-che

Edited by CheGuevara (log)
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