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Modernist Cuisine on sale?!?!?


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Update!! --- the sale is still going on at Amazon as of Sunday (11/24) at 11:15am EST

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Did anyone note the sale price on Modernist Cuisine today (maybe yesterday)? Amazon and Target dropped the set of tomes to $379!!!

 

This price looks like it will change after today...so get it ASAP!!!

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/0982761007?pf_rd_p=183f5289-9dc0-416f-942e-e8f213ef368b&pf_rd_r=SRFCHFB5EFTGAA8AZHJX

-or-

https://www.target.com/p/modernist-cuisine-by-nathan-myhrvold-chris-young-maxime-bilet-hardcover/-/A-77279948

Edited by K8CanCook (log)
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Kate "KJ" Phillips

"Your body is not a temple, it's an amusement park. Enjoy the ride." - Anthony Bourdain

Hard working Apprentice, always ready to cook, taste, eat, or avoid sleeping to have fun with family or friends.

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I'm so conflicted about this. That price is still holding for now. I have it in my cart.  I've coveted Modernist Cuisine since it came out and the price hasn't been this low since 2013 so it's a good buy.  I use my cookbooks regularly but the "master tomes" with recipes for everything aren't what I currently gravitate to.  I'm not a modernist cook and am more drawn to  books that are framed in a personal point of view..  Would I really use these books?  For $379, I could buy a lot of other books.  What do to? What to do?

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13 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

I'm so conflicted about this. That price is still holding for now. I have it in my cart.  I've coveted Modernist Cuisine since it came out and the price hasn't been this low since 2013 so it's a good buy.  I use my cookbooks regularly but the "master tomes" with recipes for everything aren't what I currently gravitate to.  I'm not a modernist cook and am more drawn to  books that are framed in a personal point of view..  Would I really use these books?  For $379, I could buy a lot of other books.  What do to? What to do?

to tell you the truth, I've read the entire set but the only recipe I used was for melting cheese with chemicals (sodium nitrate i think?) for mac and cheese.

 

A lot of it was more like Harold McGee's classic, On Food and Cooking or Kenj Alt Lopze "Food Lab." 

 

But the level of research and detail was super thorough and they have beautiful pictures to keep you entertained. 

 

I didn't read all those volumes straight through but instead did it on and off over a 2 year period. 

 

But it did provide me with these background models on how to think about food and cooking and what's going on inside the process while we cook  

Edited by eugenep (log)
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