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heidih

Surimi/Kamaboku/Krab/crab product

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I grew up with this stuff in the 60's !!!  Neighbor's husband was Japanese. A childhood memory and maybe why I  still like surimi in general. Any other Westerners have a memory or cooking use?. I generally use it in a salad prep.   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kamaboko

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Oh yeah ... I used to eat those ... not really Western but sort of (mom’s Korean) - so - we sort of grouped it all under the ‘eomuk’ category - eomuk - odeng - kamaboku -  whatever - we put it in soups - fried it - whatever 🤷🏻‍♀️ Man I loved that stuff *sigh* loved loved loved it ❤️❤️❤️ 

 

When I first moved out on my own - I made soup and I swear I put more eomuk  in my soup than I put soup 😂

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I have an EpiPen ... my friend gave it to me when he was dying ... it seemed very important to him that I have it ... 

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I do not like pink anything but this was the highlight for me of their annual Christmas party for me. It seemed so exotic and yet accessible. 


Edited by heidih (log)

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For us, it was not a special occasion dish -    we didn’t have it every day, but we had it often enough in a variety of ways ... any way we had it was my favorite 😁 😂 


I have an EpiPen ... my friend gave it to me when he was dying ... it seemed very important to him that I have it ... 

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I was an adult when I first encountered it - Japanese was not a "thing" in 1970s Nova Scotia or Newfoundland - and truthfully, my immediate impression was "fish bologna." :P

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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🤣 I think I will leave the “fish bologna” description” out next time I serve it to Mr Cat and Cat Son 😂 apt though it may be 😁 

 

Growing up, I remember my mom and her friends getting together sometimes and making various eomuk together ... (they’d do this sometimes - make Romulo - or rice cake or mochi blah blah blah - they’d always want my mom there because she was a much better cook - other times she’d show up with the ingredients and just tell them how to do it best while she watched 😂

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I have an EpiPen ... my friend gave it to me when he was dying ... it seemed very important to him that I have it ... 

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I don't know who will remember Doddie - @Domestic Goddess.  She hasn't visited in almost 10 years.  She did a wonderful food blog back in 2007.  She is Filipino and was living in S. Korea.  I got a recipe from her almost exactly 10 years ago for Ham & Crab Salad.  In my list of ingredients I have listed "fake crab" - what I call Krab or surimi.  I always saw it as a cheat - a guilty pleasure.  I ate it as a poor college student when I wanted shrimp or crab.  I discovered on my own that it made a very good "Krab" Louie.  I remember Doddie saying that it was very popular in Asia and that I should think of it not as fake crab, but as @heidih said on the Dinner thread "its own thing".  

 

I put it in a bisque last night and it was fine, but probably not it's best use - it is so mild that the flavor kind of gets lost if it is in something too complicated.  I think it works best cold and in salad-type applications.  I'd love to hear what others do with this.  Listen, if Spam can have it's own thread, surely surimi can😁!  One suggestion, though - I had no idea what kamaboku meant and probably wouldn't have come to this topic without your post in the dinner thread, @heidih.  And, seeing @CatIsHungry's post, it seems that there are other names for it, as well.  Could the name of the thread be changed to include the other names, maybe.  We might get a bigger response that way.  

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I noticed I neglected to answer @heidih question for uses - and really the only thing I’ve ever used it in is Korean food - a large variety of soups (I would even try to persuade my mom to put it in seaweed soup ha! - she’d just roll her eyes and tell me it would ruin the healing properties of it and stop it 😂 - but I swear seaweed soup would cure what ailed ) ... Okay, from a huge variety of soups (even it’s own eomuk  soup) to Kim-bap (if it’s not in Kim-bap  - it’s not Kim-bap 😉)  ... 

 

As much as I love the stuff, weirdly - I never used it in other foods 🤷🏻‍♀️

 

I read the the forums for a long time before so actually joined - read a lot of archived posts, etc and I remember reading @Domestic Goddess posts - she was one of the reasons I was excited about joining here - I did t realize until later her posts were from long time ago 😔 but she is right @Kim Shook - it is it’s own thing. 

 

You know, IMO - every “thing” is / has the potential to be an ingredient - it really doesn’t matter what it is - doesn’t matter if it’s fresh or ultra processed and we shouldn’t be shamed or embarrassed out of using it (dang - except balut- just - *shudder* yikes 😲 😉) ... we use what we can use - we like what we like ... food shamers can suck it 😉😉

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I have an EpiPen ... my friend gave it to me when he was dying ... it seemed very important to him that I have it ... 

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It definitely deserves its own thread! 

 

I do miss surimi products a lot since coming back from Asia to Germany. Technically, surimi in Japanese refers to the groud paste of fish with seasoning (salt, sugar, mirin, sake, MSG) and binder (potato starch). It is then formed and cooked, either boiled (hanpen and others), steamed (kamaboko and others) or fried (satsuma age and others).

 

Now, with the winter coming I am craving hot oden soup with satsuma age, daikon and eggs ... I prepared some satsuma age varieties two weeks ago and will use them up in the next weeks in homemade oden 🤗

 

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Looks really good ❤️ 

 

We made our slightly different - added some ground shrimp for a chewy texture ... rolled it into balls - made it flat - half moons etc ... refrigerate for immediate use- freeze for later blah blah blah 

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I have an EpiPen ... my friend gave it to me when he was dying ... it seemed very important to him that I have it ... 

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I do like shrimp and/or squid versions as well. Steamed and then grilled on a skewer. And usually made a but seeeter than the fish ones ... As they dont absorb the broth so well, I usually dont put them in oden, though.

 

In many prefectures in Japan they use fatty fish (mackarel, even sardines) for the paste ... excellent products as well. Very good with hot mustard.

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