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liuzhou

The End of Hummus?

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Paywalled, alas.


“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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LOL I guess we colonials don't rate... :P

 

(ETA: I looked up other articles covering the same ground, so thanks anyway for the heads-up. Biodiversity is a serious concern with most worldwide staple crops...)


Edited by chromedome (log)

“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Here's the source material, for anyone else who can't read the original link. 

 

TL:DR version:

https://www.uvm.edu/uvmnews/news/genetic-limits-threaten-chickpeas-globally-critical-food

 

Science-geek version:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-02867-z

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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@liuzhou's link in the post above took me to a paywall but when I googled Financial Times Hummus, I got a link that took me to the article titled "The fight to save hummus from extinction"

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12 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

@liuzhou's link in the post above took me to a paywall but when I googled Financial Times Hummus, I got a link that took me to the article titled "The fight to save hummus from extinction"

 

Yes. That's the article I was referencing.

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10 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Yes. That's the article I was referencing

The loss of bio diversity concerns me a great deal. The end of hummus not so much. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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I could deal with losing hummus, though I do like it. I am not sure I could deal with losing falafel.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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On 11/6/2019 at 10:23 PM, Margaret Pilgrim said:

So use another bean.

 

Yeah, for those of us in other countries we can switch things up (for falafel fava beans are equally canonical; and we can certainly make other bean dips).

 

In the areas where chickpeas are a staple, though, it's not that simple. They're a core agricultural crop as well as a core food, so on one hand the food chain becomes that much more precarious for everyone if the crop fails (ie, we're likely looking at millions of people starving) and the agricultural sector also needs to learn - almost overnight - how to reinvent itself around a new and unfamiliar crop.

 

To put it into perspective, imagine a sudden blight wiping out the US corn crop. Americans and Canadians (because we grow the same cultivars, it would affect us as well) would not be in imminent danger of starving, thankfully, but it would be a massive, costly and emotionally wrenching* dislocation.

*How many corn-based dishes are hard-core, group-identity comfort foods in the Americas? It's like that for chickpeas in their homelands, too.

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Yes!  My prior attempted post did not go yesterday. In many developing nations chickpeas are the affordable protein. But it is encouragng that scientists are working on it.  Not an ignored issue.

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