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kayb

Cool weather cooking

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As it seems to have decided to be fall (a bit of color starting to appear in the leaves, and more importantly, mid-50s and raining), my kitchen, which I've sadly ignored in the four months since I've moved, calls to me.

 

Faced with a Saturday with, miraculously, nothing to do, so far I've put on a pot of carbonnades a la flamande to simmer for dinner (instead of the traditional egg noodles, we'll have them over grits), mixed up a batch of America's Test Kitchen GF flour blend, and tried my hand at my first GF brownies. Still on my agenda for the day is a fresh apple cake, adapted to GF, and a batch of pimiento cheese for next week's lunches.

 

I have also discovered my Aldi has grocery delivery. It is raining buckets, and my Aldi is going to deliver my groceries to my door for a $3.99 charge. You bet I'll jump on that, particularly as the first three orders for delivery get $10 off per order.

 

I may bestir myself to bake bread, which, of course, I'll have to give away, but that's OK, too.

 

Later next week, since the cool weather is supposed to hang around, there'll be carrot soup with sorghum grains in it. 

 

What do you like to cook when it finally gets cool?

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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For me it’s often soup, any kind.  I just love making it nearly as much as I like bread-making.

Next, maybe tomorrow, is Beef Bourguignon.

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SOUP!!!  Squash, onion(broth with both chicken and beef), red lentil, mushroom.

Casseroles of all sorts.

Meatloaf, roasted chicken, stews, chili, roasted venison, roasted pork loin.

Baked potatoes, potatoes au gratin … potatoes and egg noodles?!

Roasted cauliflower, red cabbage, vegetable stew....

 

already did the yearly sauerbrauten with gingersnap gravy., red cabbage, applesauce and potato pancakes.

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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I made chili last weekend, and serious soup making will probably start after Thanksgiving. Really need to make a batch of whole wheat banana muffins for breakfasts. Still in golf season so I only have one weekend day for cooking projects.

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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Soup everyday...hearty kind in the winter...lentils, beans, barley, etc.

Curries.  We love any kind...vegetable or meat.

More cooked vegetable sides rather than salads.

Meat pies.


Edited by Okanagancook (log)
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8 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

Soup everyday...hearty kind in the winter...lentils, beans, barley, etc.

Curries.  We love any kind...vegetable or meat.

More cooked vegetable sides rather than salads.

Meat pies.

 

Summer we do salads two nights in a row and then one night vegetables or soup.  Winter we do the opposites and the salad is a more traditional one rather than 6 different salads as in the summer, that is: bean salad, tabbouleh,  cucumber salad, tri-pepper salad, potato salad, plus romaine and tomatoes.  Apparently we are still working on summer because Ed bought 3 more English cucumbers yesterday and is set to prepare the potatoes for another refill of that one.  Then no more please.  The freezer is already full of soups.  Oh, we eat our 'dinner' at noon...like farmers or day laborers.  Which I guess we are.

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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This topic reminds my of my time in Uni, when we staged the great winter broccoli rebellion. It was one of the few available winter veg my house could afford but we had had enough!

 

Last week I did last-gasp sous-vide lamb shanks (post-sear, then coated in dukkah and quickly crisped again). My lamb lady said, the slow cuts will go into sausage for the summer.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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I think about the dosa I never baked this summer.  The dosa my informants assure me cannot be properly fermented in cooler weather.

 

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acorn squash, braised short rib, pork roast,

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I made chili this weekend as well. I brought back some William's Chili Seasoning with me the last time I was in Kansas City. Who know you can't get that stuff outside of KC? I usually load up a box with WCS and barbecue sauce from Gate's, Bryant's and Joe's. 

 

Oh, and I made cornbread in the cast iron skillet to go with it. 

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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Risotto, risotto and more risotto. Just had dinner with squash risotto, even if it's still hot like hell here (today we peaked at 23° C - 74 F).
Radicchio in all the ways, it's the best vegetable this land has to offer.
Polenta with everything.
Goose, November is the goose month here. I'm sure the two gooses I saw today understood pretty clearly which where my thoughts, judging on how loud they screamed at me after noticing the way I was looking at them.
Cotechino with mashed potatoes, I love "cotechino con la lingua" (the one with the tongue pieces inside) more than the plain classic cotechino.
Brassicas are starting to show, if cooked well they have nothing to envy to summer vegetables, if cooked badly they are the worst stuff on earth.
Roasted chestnuts, this is the flavor that screams autumn for me.
Marrons glacés, they are a guilty pleasure limited to autumn, otherwise my name would be Ted Zeppelin.
Focaccia veneziana, the typical enriched bread of this land, which I love more than panettone.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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Another cool, overcast day. Tonight's dinner was white bean and sausage soup. And tomorrow's lunch, and a few other lunches this week!

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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cold front moving in...very windy.  Made pork pie from “Pig” yesterday.

 The crust is a biscuit dough made with flour, butter, milk, baking powder, s and p.  The filling is very simple...pork, finely chopped onions and a little green pepper, garlic, sage and stock...I used a concentrated pork stock which really made the filling taste intensely porky.  Turned out very well and the leftovers were near perfect after being heated in the CSO on bake steam...the crust was nice and crispy.

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7 hours ago, teonzo said:

Risotto, risotto and more risotto. Just had dinner with squash risotto, even if it's still hot like hell here (today we peaked at 23° C - 74 F).
Radicchio in all the ways, it's the best vegetable this land has to offer.
Polenta with everything.
Goose, November is the goose month here. I'm sure the two gooses I saw today understood pretty clearly which where my thoughts, judging on how loud they screamed at me after noticing the way I was looking at them.
Cotechino with mashed potatoes, I love "cotechino con la lingua" (the one with the tongue pieces inside) more than the plain classic cotechino.
Brassicas are starting to show, if cooked well they have nothing to envy to summer vegetables, if cooked badly they are the worst stuff on earth.
Roasted chestnuts, this is the flavor that screams autumn for me.
Marrons glacés, they are a guilty pleasure limited to autumn, otherwise my name would be Ted Zeppelin.
Focaccia veneziana, the typical enriched bread of this land, which I love more than panettone.

 

 

 

Teo

 

74f is hot?

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9 hours ago, gfweb said:

74f is hot?

 

For the end of October, yes definetely, the usual high should be around 55 F here. This is by far the hottest October I've experienced.

 

 

 

Teo

 


Teo

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2 minutes ago, teonzo said:

 

For the end of October, yes definetely, the usual high should be around 55 F here. This is by far the hottest October I've experienced.

 

 

 

Teo

 

I see what you mean.

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Here in the Northern Rockies we're setting records for the cold.

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Well - it’s finally starting to get cool here - I’ve made beef stew - chicken and dumplins (I heard Mr Cat sneeze ONCE - off to the grocery I went for chicken etc LOL) pinto beans with ham hock and cornbread - sausage gravy (made with wild hog sausage) and biscuits - and on the horizon is split pea soup with ham/potatoes/carrots ... 

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I have an EpiPen ... my friend gave it to me when he was dying ... it seemed very important to him that I have it ... 

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For me it's anything that I can add mushrooms to! Chicken with mushrooms, mushroom ragu for pasta, mushroom risotto or lasagne and the list goes on. I love them baked in the oven for breakfast and served with eggs on toast. At this time of year, when we're out walking our dogs, we often see people out foraging for mushrooms in the forests. There are so many and a huge array of varieties. I wish I knew enough to forage myself, but I'm terrified of poisoning us by accident. I know we could take them to the pharmacie, but I'm still too chicken to try!

 

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Beans!  I love to cook beans low and slow in the oven as I think that method lets them become their very best selves.  

I'll do some in the Instant Pot in the summer to use for bean dips but I'm looking forward to cooler days ahead when I can start working through my stash of Rancho Gordo beans. 

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1 hour ago, blue_dolphin said:

Beans!  I love to cook beans low and slow in the oven as I think that method lets them become their very best selves.  

I'll do some in the Instant Pot in the summer to use for bean dips but I'm looking forward to cooler days ahead when I can start working through my stash of Rancho Gordo beans. 

 

With you on that, although I do cook mine in the IP. I made a big pot of white bean and sausage soup t'other day (I dearly love Rancho Gordo's Marcella beans for it). As it's in the 50s and raining, I expect I'll see that for lunch or dinner, as I had a tremendous amount of it left.

 

In the summer, I like bean salad. I'll cook two or three kinds of RGs -- bits of bags I have left over -- and steam some green beans, a good viniagrette, and some canned tuna in oil on the side....m'mmm. But this time of year, yes, little beats beans simmered with some pork or sausage.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Ah yes.  Beans.  In my case it has to be white navy beans and it has to be the recipe which Ed's Mom used.  And so it is.  And it's good.  


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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