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kayb

Thanksgiving 2019

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We're doing this:

Roast chicken

Deviled eggs

Candied yams

Cornbread dressing

Gravy

Mashed potatoes

Whole cranberry sauce from a can

Korbel and Beaujolais to drink

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This year’s menu is a kind of traditional one for us. And as it will be just the two of us, our turkey course will be two thighs (roasted), rather than the whole bird. Sides will be mashed potatoes, bread dressing, gravy, green peas, whole berry cranberry sauce (from the can) and homemade dinner rolls. Snacks to have before our meal will include deviled eggs, black olives, sweet pickles and celery sticks stuffed with cream cheese spread. Wines will be Pinot Noir for him and Chardonnay for me.


Edited by robirdstx (log)
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Status update:

 

  • One turkey half plus one wing is smoked. Remainder of turkey is dry-brining in the auxiliary fridge to go in the oven in the morning. 
  • Gluten free dressing is made and ready to slide in the oven. I had not planned on this, but Child B, my fellow celiac sufferer, asked for it, so, OK.
  • Gluten free corn casserole will be made up tonight to bake tomorrow; ditto sweet potatoes when Child C gets here in a bit, because I'm making a double batch for her to take to her hubby's family's dinner on Friday.
  • Cranberry salad was made last weekend and stashed in the fridge. It keeps well.
  • Chicken stock made and ready to have drippings added from turkey to make gravy (also GF).
  • Rolls are baked and in freezer, to be reheated in the CSO just before dinner
  • Green beans are topped, tailed and cut, ready to cook atop the stove. I decided to pass on the Brussels sprouts
  • Wine (La Crema dry rose) is chilling in the auxiliary fridge
  • Two desserts -- a gluten-free brownie that will be warmed and served with vanilla ice cream and chocolate syrup, and @Kim Shook's fig apple mascarpone tart -- made and ready to go
  • Dressing (regular) picked up from a local restaurant, to have eggs added tomorrow and then baked

So tomorrow, all there is is to roast the half-bird, make gravy, and bake three casseroles. Well, four, when you consider two different dressings.

 

Children A and C will be staying here tonight (and shifting for themselves for breakfast). Child C's hubby, as well as Child B and her hubby and two littles, should show up around 10 or 11. We're planning dinner noonish. I don't think I'm doing apps, though there may be day-drinking going on.

 

Happiest of Thanksgivings to all of you. Hope you're spending it with friends and family.

 

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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After several days of prep and sore feet, I'm ready for tomorrow. The turkeys (my husband insisted on 2 big ones) are cut apart, which is a story in itself, slathered with olive oil, garlic, thyme, salt and pepper, and stashed in big plastic bags to marinate in the fridge. There is also a ham (boneless, unfortunately) ready to be seasoned and cooked on a v-roaster on the grill, and a side of Costco salmon to grill after the ham comes off. No shortage of protein! I've made the dressing, a lot of it because it's my favorite part of Thanksgiving, and a corn pudding that I baked this afternoon and will reheat in the oven when the turkey comes out. The wingtips, backs and necks are in the stockpot with the usual suspects (carrot, celery, onion, parsley, thyme, bay leaf, black peppercorns, garlic) and will simmer on the stove overnight. I'll use that for the gravy.

 

Instead of the usual 60+ people we have pruned the list to only (!) 40. Two reasons--until very recently it has rained every day, sometimes quite hard, and because we have to put tables outside we couldn't be sure of the weather and had to think about how we could cram people into the house if necessary. But according to our local weather station it will be dry for the foreseeable future. Second, our street is being repaired and we weren't sure it would be open in time. As it turns out, it won't be. Probably Friday or Saturday, but not tomorrow. Oh well--

 

I always enjoy what our friends bring to the party. One friend is bringing 2 loaves of her sourdough with honey butter, which I'm eager to try. I love Thanksgiving--it's my favorite holiday.

 

I hope your holiday is a happy one, that the snow doesn't make travel difficult or impossible, that there are no political arguments around the table, and that everyone leaves in a food coma, full of good food and friendship.


Edited by Nancy in Pátzcuaro clarity (log)
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Formerly "Nancy in CO"

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On 11/26/2019 at 10:10 PM, CatIsHungry said:

Definitely not a "typical" Thanksgiving menu

I like that!  Mix it up, change it up!  Fun!

 

Holidays are always hosted by my brother and sister in law (bless them for doing it, 'cause it's just not my thing).  She always has me bring the bread.  It's so easy that I feel guilty so I always ask what else I can do.  This year it was salad.  Hard to come up with a salad that I think they would like--nuts and fruits etc. I don't think would be such a big hit.  No beets, no squash, no brussels sprouts....Anyway, I went with the always popular broccoli salad and a sweet jello type salad that has been in my family for decades.  It's called Jackie's Salad.  No one knows or maybe remembers who the hell Jackie is, but her salad graced most every Thanksgiving, Easter and Christmas table when I was growing up.

 

IMG_7059.JPG.64f9bca98577c39d709575a319993459.JPG

IMG_7060.jpg.612bd0557893bd57a3fa20805d4c03c4.jpg

IMG_7058.JPG.1153c0fc69944bcdb0b0aa95ba23018e.JPG

 

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1 minute ago, ElsieD said:

@Shelby  What is the dressing?

For the broccoli salad?

 

I made mayo in a mason jar using the stick blender (one cup of veg. oil, one egg, splash of vinegar and salt and pepper).  Then mixed that with about 1/4 cup of sugar, a couple TB of red wine vinegar and a bit more salt and pepper.

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Pumpkin pie murder scene.  That's the murder weapon errrr..... coat in the hallway. 

20191128_104059.jpg

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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My lovely wife was getting ready to go to the gym. I think she swung her coat around and hit it. I cobbled together another pie, it's in the oven now.

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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What a great future story! One year we had a new oven. My sister kept futzing with the turkey, not realizing that it shuts off if door open for more than a few seconds. You have to push start again. I was gathering greens outside for decor and walked in to NO turkey smell. Bit of a delay there. Oh and the time the old oven gave up the ghost half an hour in and we had to take the beast to a nearby relative to cook. Hhmm - an oven issue trend... Last year the hostess had someone pop the Costco mini quiches for appetizer in the oven and when the helpful guest went to take them out she dropped the pan and of course they landed face down. We embraced the 3 second rule - her floor was kinda clean and not too much filling was lost. But in all these situations we laughed so "all good"

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Doing Alton Browns’s dry brined spatchcocked turkey with roasted vegetable panzanella for the first time this year. You roast the turkey directly on the oven rack with a pan of vegetables and bread  below. Should be interesting,

 

Yesterday my husband and his mom made pies, as is their tradition. In addition to the pumpkin pie with pecan streusel topping that I adore, they made a lemon meringue for the first time. My job is to find the recipes and go to work so they can bake. I gave them the Chez Panisse lemon meringue pie recipe from the  Essential NY Times cookbook as I’ve been reading that lately. The meringue wept and separated a bit so my husband doesn’t want to serve it and he and I whipped up a trusted recipe, the Mile High Chocolate pie from Bon Appetit after dinner last night.  However we tried the lemon pie later last night and it was freaking delicious. The lemon layer is more like a custard than most versions and he’d used Meyer lemons. Yum. He’ll figure out the meringue issue for next time,  I know.

 

We’ll have 8 people altogether. I made gravy from roasted turkey wings last night, and I’ll make mashed potatoes later. Rolls are Kenji’s stuffing rolls. My SIL is bringing an appetizer and cranberry sauce (new recipe we found in O magazine that has Campari, so we were in), a friend is bringing green beans with shallots and bacon, and my winemaker friends are bringing bubbles and wine.

 

Happy Thanksgiving to all!

 

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I'm going to a dinner with about 12.  I've made two things, one new recipe, one old.

-The new recipe is a Huckleberry-Cranberry Compote served warm.  The compote starts with cooking the berries down with sugar, a bit of lemon juice and orange zest.  Then in goes some red wine and balsamic vinegar.  The spices are cinnamon and fresh-grated nutmeg.  Cook down to the consistency you like.  I prefer a thick compote, so may add some cornstarch blended with water.

 

Warm Cranberry-Huckleberry Compote.JPG

 

-and my "dressing."  My Father always made the dressing or stuffing when I was young.  He wasn't a great cook, but enjoyed food and did a great job with dressing.  His "secret" according to him was to add 2 eggs to keep the dressing moist.  And he always removed the cover the last few minutes of baking to get the top crusty.  I think he liked a big portion of stuffing doused with gravy more than the turkey. I start with Franz "croutons".  They've made them for years and it's still the best I think.  I also use the little spice packet that comes in the bag.  This year I used two bags so I'll have enough for the party and lots leftover for home.

To the croutons I add pork sausage, lots of onion and celery cooked in lots of butter, dried cranberries and chopped pecans.  I add poultry seasoning, lots of black pepper and a bit of salt.  I happen to love sage, and add some but I know it can be overpowering.  Bake one hour at 350, then crisp under the broiler a few minutes.  It's actually better the next day.

 00072220002966-5fXfBiyRiXMrJQ-0_s500.jpg

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Going OUT!     To nephew's house.    Will be 15 adults, 3 kids.    I'm taking 2 loaves warm 18 hour bread, pound of butter, gravy (made from 10 turkey necks, meat then turned into ragu Bolognese which I sent to son's house), double batch of cornbread stuffing and cranberry sauce.   I realized I didn't have any orange or tangerine for the cranberry sauce so...Grand Marnier to the rescue!     And a few bottles of wine....

 

Sending warm greetings to all wherever you find yourselves today.

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eGullet member #80.

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1 hour ago, NadyaDuke said:

My SIL is bringing an appetizer and cranberry sauce (new recipe we found in O magazine that has Campari, so we were in), (snipped content)

 

 

Wow Campari in the cranberry sauce - genius. Tell us how went over

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2 hours ago, David Ross said:

I'm going to a dinner with about 12.  I've made two things, one new recipe, one old.

-The new recipe is a Huckleberry-Cranberry Compote served warm.  The compote starts with cooking the berries down with sugar, a bit of lemon juice and orange zest.  Then in goes some red wine and balsamic vinegar.  The spices are cinnamon and fresh-grated nutmeg.  Cook down to the consistency you like.  I prefer a thick compote, so may add some cornstarch blended with water.

 

Warm Cranberry-Huckleberry Compote.JPG

 

-and my "dressing."  My Father always made the dressing or stuffing when I was young.  He wasn't a great cook, but enjoyed food and did a great job with dressing.  His "secret" according to him was to add 2 eggs to keep the dressing moist.  And he always removed the cover the last few minutes of baking to get the top crusty.  I think he liked a big portion of stuffing doused with gravy more than the turkey. I start with Franz "croutons".  They've made them for years and it's still the best I think.  I also use the little spice packet that comes in the bag.  This year I used two bags so I'll have enough for the party and lots leftover for home.

To the croutons I add pork sausage, lots of onion and celery cooked in lots of butter, dried cranberries and chopped pecans.  I add poultry seasoning, lots of black pepper and a bit of salt.  I happen to love sage, and add some but I know it can be overpowering.  Bake one hour at 350, then crisp under the broiler a few minutes.  It's actually better the next day.

 00072220002966-5fXfBiyRiXMrJQ-0_s500.jpg

 

This is the Cranberry-Huckleberry Compote Recipe-

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup red wine Merlot or Zinfandel are best in this recipe
  • 1 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar
  • 1 cup wild huckleberries substitute blueberries
  • 1 cup fresh cranberries
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/4 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp. nutmeg
  • 1/8 tsp. ground cloves

Instructions

  1. Combine the red wine,  lemon juice, balsamic vinegar, huckleberries, cranberries, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves in a large saucepan over medium heat. Bring the mixture to a boil then reduce the heat to low. Cook the compote, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes or until the compote thickens. To thicken the compote, stir 1 tbsp. cornstarch into 3 tbsp. of water, then stir into the compote.

  2. Just before serving, heat the compote in a saucepan over low heat and serve on the side.

  3. The compote will keep covered in the fridge for up to 3 weeks.

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My Thanksgiving dinner (Cooked in my electric pressure cooker, 27 minutes on high pressure. Perfectly done.
Fresh pork loin "roast" 21 ounces.  On a 12 inch platter.  with Potatoes, Carrots, Celery.
Sliced tomatoes and a slice of the bread I baked yesterday.
Hot tea, a malty Assam with milk and just a hint of sugar.

I was going to make gravy but decided that can wait till tomorrow. I can make open-face sandwiches with gravy on a thick slice of my bread.

Note that I didn't show my plate. I cut my slice of roast up at the counter, also the tomatoes, so I would only need a fork while eating.

 

HPIM4228.jpg


Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Only going to list a couple of things.

 

Based upon a friend's recommendation I SVed halved Brussel Sprouts in butter, salt, pepper and thyme. Came out very well. The strange thing was my Anova Bluetooth. I set it for 185. It tried to hunt and peck for 185 and eventually settled for 180.5. I've never had it above 147 until today. Not sure what to make of it. When I do try it again I'll going for 178 and let it go a bit longer.

 

I decided to, for the first time, poach a 13 lb turkey. I under-seasoned the poaching broth but not badly. However, family was was late and the turkey ended up over-done. I had to quickly whip up a gravy to help it out.  I'll do it again sometime but with different timing. I didn't have a way to keep it warm if I'd pulled it out sooner.

 

Also, we completely missed making one veggie, bourbon carrots.

 

We had a good time as family sharing this meal together, which of course is the most important part.

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Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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21 hours ago, David Ross said:

 

This is the Cranberry-Huckleberry Compote Recipe-

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup red wine Merlot or Zinfandel are best in this recipe
  • 1 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar
  • 1 cup wild huckleberries substitute blueberries
  • 1 cup fresh cranberries
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/4 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp. nutmeg
  • 1/8 tsp. ground cloves

Instructions

  1. Combine the red wine,  lemon juice, balsamic vinegar, huckleberries, cranberries, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves in a large saucepan over medium heat. Bring the mixture to a boil then reduce the heat to low. Cook the compote, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes or until the compote thickens. To thicken the compote, stir 1 tbsp. cornstarch into 3 tbsp. of water, then stir into the compote.

  2. Just before serving, heat the compote in a saucepan over low heat and serve on the side.

  3. The compote will keep covered in the fridge for up to 3 weeks.

I'm part of a Huckleberry group on Facebook, mainly comprised of folks in the Pacific Northwest regions where the berries grow wild.  These are some serious pickers and cooks and a number of them made this compote for Thanksgiving.  Friends and families all loved it which makes me happy.  On man used a spiced wine in place of the red wine and said it turned out very good.

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A mixed bag at my house. The turkey was absolutely wonderful, both the smoked half and the dry-brined and roasted half. It was the first time I'd dry brined, and as it's SO much simpler, I think it's my new go-to. Both bird halves boasted plenty of juciness, and excellent flavor. My gluten free dressing was much better than I had anticipated. And the son-in-law LOVED @Kim Shook's fig-apple-mascarpone tart; I think he ate three pieces. Green beans were meh (just cooked in water with butter and salt, so the little people would eat them). I forgot the vanilla in the sweet potatoes, and forgot to take the foil off when I baked them, so they didn't get crispy on top. Ditto the corn casserole, also inadvertently baked with foil on. 

 

But we were all full, the wine was excellent, and I am eating leftover cranberry salad for breakfast. 

 

And the very best thing was having all my girls and their families here.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Steven Colbert hosted José Andrés recently on The Late Show and their cooking segment featured a couple of dishes using Thanksgiving leftovers - a cranberry cocktail and turkey croquetas.  

Here's a link in case anyone wants to try them - have your liquid nitrogen handy!

 

I usually find Colbert annoyingly silly in these segments but Andrés was in fine form and matched him at each step.  It's pretty funny.

 

Edited to add: Here's the first part of the interview where he talks a bit more about World Central Kitchen and Thanksgiving, too. 

 


Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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The best part of Thsnksgiving, and a photo that DID get taken:

 

FB_IMG_1575050866244.thumb.jpg.751c5334aa736abc9b6e096f84bbba9a.jpg

 

Me and my tribe. Sons-in-law were watching football.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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@heidih The cranberry sauce was good, though hard to tell how much of the bitterness  came from Campari and how much from the grapefruit. We really like the technique of cooking half the cranberries down and then barely cooking the rest so you had some whole.  Here’s the recipe https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/bobby-flay/grapefruit-campari-cranberry-relish-recipe-2120647

 

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1 hour ago, NadyaDuke said:

@heidih The cranberry sauce was good, though hard to tell how much of the bitterness  came from Campari and how much from the grapefruit. We really like the technique of cooking half the cranberries down and then barely cooking the rest so you had some whole.  Here’s the recipe https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/bobby-flay/grapefruit-campari-cranberry-relish-recipe-2120647

 

 

I am a bitter lover so might give it a go though none of my friends are- so it would be just me.

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Braised beef short ribs, green beans with bacon, creamed corn casserole, crash smashed potatoes.

 

20191129_202154.jpg

 

I quite forgot the carrots, which we had today along with leftovers,

 

20191129_183306.jpg

 

and we were too full for the persimmon panna cotta. The beauty of going to all that trouble yesterday

 

20191128_182737.jpg

 

is that there was no cookery needed today except simply reheating. The caramelized carrot "salad", incidentally, was done by this method and was good even without the bearnaise called for in the recipe, although I did dab some remoulade sauce after taking the photo. I liked the extra kick.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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