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Cooking With The Whole Okra By Chris Smith


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Thanks to @blue_dolphin, I was forced to buy this cookbook ;) and it was delivered today.  No matter how hard I try, I just don't super enjoy cookbooks on my Kindle.  Anyway, I'll most likely be alone on this thread due to low okra likability lol, but I'm an only child and I'm used to being alone 😁

 

 

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 First on the list will be the Kimchi Okra from page 100--as suggested by @blue_dolphin.

 

I'll be back on this thread soon :) 

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I love me some okra, as long as it's roasted or fried, and not boiled. Some of the best okra I ever ate was tiny pods, maybe two inches long, skewered and apparentely dipped in egg wash and then breaded in cornmeal mix and fried. Pretty wonderful.

 

I will eat as much fried okra as you will put in front of me. I like roasted okra. I will tolerate okra in gumbo, etc. But don't be serving me any okra boiled with anything.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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I’m with @kayb, I will eat as much fried okra as you can put in front of me .  Bought some at the farmer’s market on Sunday and am going to use the Deep Run Roots fried okra hash recipe tomorrow.  Seems easier and less messy than my granny’s method.

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3 hours ago, ElsieD said:

I wonder if Michael (not @blue_dolphin 's cat) is related to Conway?  Anyway, I'm interested in this.  Not enough to buy the book, I'm a Northerner after all, but I do like me some okra every now and again.

 

Maybe, but Conway Twitty is a stage name and Michael Twitty is Black, so probably not :)

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Per kayb, the tiny stuff rocks.   

 

Re this kind of judgment, I often stand next to another shopper while we each select produce.   Sometimes I am aware that there is a tension between us, as she/he tries to out-maneuver me, until I notice that one of us is picking out the largest of the produce while the other is snatching the tiny.    There's room for all!

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eGullet member #80.

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Another okra fan here. Would love to have a look at the book.

Dried okra makes a great snack.

Of course, pick out the smaller pods. The  people picking out the largest have no idea what they are doing. Large pods are the stringiest, most inedible vegetable on the planet. But those people serve the charitable purpose of removing the garbage so that I can get to the little'uns.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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16 hours ago, Shelby said:

Thanks to @blue_dolphin, I was forced to buy this cookbook ;) and it was delivered today.  No matter how hard I try, I just don't super enjoy cookbooks on my Kindle.  Anyway, I'll most likely be alone on this thread due to low okra likability lol, but I'm an only child and I'm used to being alone 😁

 

First on the list will be the Kimchi Okra from page 100--as suggested by @blue_dolphin.

 

I'll be back on this thread soon :) 

 

Yay!  I'm so glad I could help enable a cook book purchase 🙃.  It really sounded like a good book.  I'll be watching the post and maybe I'll be reverse-enabled into getting it myself!

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