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Myhrvold Modernist Cuisine Creme Anglaise


Luke
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I made the Creme Anglaise recipe from Myhrvold Modernist Cuisine - it did look curdled and lumpy coming out of the zip lock bag as described in the recipe.

 

I used my stick blender to smooth it out as instructed, but I think I blended it for too long, and it went from lumpy to smooth to watery. Did I make a fatal mistake of over blending the custard?

 

The recipe does not say how to blend or when to stop.

 

Hoping one of the gurus can give me guidance before I try this again.

 

Many Thanks

Luke

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I don't have my MC set here with me, so I can't check the original recipe (minor suggestion: in such cases please write the volume number and page number where the recipe is located, flipping through MC is time consuming).

I suppose it requires to cook the basic batter in a bag at around 82°C. Problem with this is that you are not stirring the batter while it cooks, so you end up with the creme brulee / creme caramel effect: if the batter is not stirred then it starts to set. There is a good explanation about this on "On food and cooking" by Harold McGee.

To break those lumps you need to blend them, but for the least time possible. The more you blend, the less viscous the end result. Blending a creme anglaise is used when you get a too thick result and you want it more runny.

Personally I don't see the point in using this method for creme anglaise. It's such a simple and quick recipe that there is no need to go sous vide. Standard method is quicker, requires less equipment and ends up with less things to clean.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Teo

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  • 2 months later...

I have done the creme anglaise recipe and it was a bit uneven (dare I say cellulite-like?) when it came out.  I mixed it very quickly with a whisk and  it was perfectly smooth after just a few quick strokes.  I didn't use a stick blender because they are a pain to clean and the whisk method has worked well for me in the past when making pot de creme and other custard things sous vide.  

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  • 1 month later...

Interesting, sous vide type slow cook was done in paris long before todays sous vide was invented.

the crème was not cooked on the stove but assembled, placed in a thick sided crock and left on the shelf above the range at the start of service.

A folded cloth placed underneath the pot regulated the temp. Occasional stir prevents clumping.

If it broke , just whip a blob of butter into it.

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On 1/8/2020 at 5:05 AM, retired baker said:

the crème was not cooked on the stove but assembled, placed in a thick sided crock and left on the shelf above the range at the start of service.

A folded cloth placed underneath the pot regulated the temp. Occasional stir prevents clumping.

 

 

so, scald the milk, whisk into your eggs/egg yolks sugar mixture then throw it in a container on a shelf above the stove and call it a day?

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Just adding, you'd have to know what the finished sauce should be, otherwise you'd just be guessing. But yeh, thats essentially how its done.

 

Well I can't post more than a couple times a day being a newcomer. Its not worth my time.

 

I'm not coming back, good luck with it.

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4 hours ago, retired baker said:

Just adding, you'd have to know what the finished sauce should be, otherwise you'd just be guessing. But yeh, thats essentially how its done.

 

Well I can't post more than a couple times a day being a newcomer. Its not worth my time.

 

I'm not coming back, good luck with it.

Don't leave please :)  I don't know exactly the number but I'm sure soon you'll have unlimited posting ability.   

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