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paynemj

KitchenAid Mixer differences

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Hi,

 

Aside from the wire guard and stop switch, what are the differences between these two models? The spec sheets are almost identical, outside of one having a wattage of 325W and the other being 500W... but what's the significance there? (One mentions a 4.7L bowl, but I think that's a typo as it's not mentioned in the contents...)

 

https://www.kitchenaid.co.uk/small-appliances/stand-mixer/6.9-l-heavy-duty-bowl-lift-stand-mixer-5ksm7591x/859701015390

 

https://www.kitchenaid.co.uk/small-appliances/stand-mixer/6.9-l-professional-stand-mixer-5ksm7990x/859701115390

 

Thanks!

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@paynemj I have a US KitchenAid model similar to these.  For my mixer the 4.7 liter/ 5 quart bowl was an extra cost accessory.  It is the bowl I regularly use.

 

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if you are going to do heavy work like bread dough kneading, get the 500 watt model.

if you're restricting it to light duty - cake mixes and souffle - the 350 watt model will do.

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

@paynemj I have a US KitchenAid model similar to these.  For my mixer the 4.7 liter/ 5 quart bowl was an extra cost accessory.  It is the bowl I regularly use.

 

 

Yeah, that's one of the additional things I'll buy for sure.

 

1 hour ago, AlaMoi said:

if you are going to do heavy work like bread dough kneading, get the 500 watt model.

if you're restricting it to light duty - cake mixes and souffle - the 350 watt model will do.

 

That's the thing, the lower wattage version is the cheaper one. Both are 1.3 horse power.

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I'd say their copy is seriously out of sync.

 

fwiw, one horsepower converts to 745 watts in real life.

the advertising departments use "peak power" in their fake lives.

 

if you read around, you will find people who have overloaded and burned up their mixers.

if you're going to do heavy dough mixing, get the 500 watt model.

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On 8/25/2019 at 4:27 PM, AlaMoi said:

I'd say their copy is seriously out of sync.

 

fwiw, one horsepower converts to 745 watts in real life.

the advertising departments use "peak power" in their fake lives.

 

if you read around, you will find people who have overloaded and burned up their mixers.

if you're going to do heavy dough mixing, get the 500 watt model.

 

Every consumer appliance company I've seen fudges their numbers. Even Vita-Mix's horsepower math doesn't add up.

 

The more honest companies (like Hobart) measure output horsepower. This is one reason a 5qt Hobart rated at 1/5 horsepower could whip any of these higher-rated consumer mixers into light, greasy mousse. 

 

Ignoring the dumb numbers, the newer 7qt KA models use a much heavier motor than previous generations, and a heavier transmission with planetary gears. These run quiet and should be better at bread than any previous versions. 

 

My older style Pro 600 has made a lot of bread and pasta and other abusive things. It's pretty loud, though, and I'm careful with it. I know what a straining motor sounds / feels / smells like, and I'm never far from the on-off switch. Using the new model should be more casual. 


Notes from the underbelly

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