Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

MetsFan5

What Proteins won’t you eat?

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

The tastiest of the "rats" isn't a rat, as such. That is the so-called bamboo rat. The local species, the Chinese bamboo rat, Rhizomys sinensis, as its Chinese* and English names suggest, lives in the bamboo groves and it lives on bamboo almost exclusively. It can grow up to 8½-15 inches long (plus tail) and is rather stout.

 

*竹鼠 (zhú shǔ, literally 'bamboo rat')

 

1457627291_bamboorat.thumb.jpg.41836946c5cb0aa746003c09a5a5479f.jpg

Rhizomys sinensis - Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology - Public Domain Image


Edited by liuzhou (log)
  • Like 3
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll try anything once.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another esoteric rat is the coypu or nutria.    I have seen nutria meat (as well s pelts and pelt products) for sale at farmer's markets in France.   


eGullet member #80.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently made a Kiva load to a chef in Peru to buy more cuys (guinea pigs).  She caters to the tourists that feel eating one of the rodents is a "must" on their trip to visit Machu Picchu.  She repaid the loan on time so I guess she knew her clients! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hey. i'm surprised no one said "human." 

 

It's a dark thought but, as everyone knows, this did happen during war and famine in many cultures. 

 

There was an article in Vanity Fair where a former war refugee was starving and he found a place where the shop owner had a lot of "sticks of meat." 

 

He tried it and he immediately recognized the taste and reported it to the police. The police was surprised that the refugee knew right away and found out that the refugee took part in the civl war in the country not too long ago and that he told the police he could recognize the meat as human bc it had a taste (like humans have some kind of unique taste in the way other animals do: pork, chicken, beef etc).

 

Ummm...if I had to guess..we are a species of monkey so...the taste he sensed out might be monkey meat??? 

 

I would like to try veal brains. Author James Peterson said it's cooked just like sweat bread and tastes the same but costs less and that it's just cultural prejudice that makes many people not want to buy or try it. But it has to be super fresh though. Never tried but maybe one day. 


"Hmmm....what would Don Quixote do?" 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, eugenep said:

hey. i'm surprised no one said "human." 

 

 

 

Just. Ewwwwwwww.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, eugenep said:

hey. i'm surprised no one said "human." 

 

It's a dark thought but, as everyone knows, this did happen during war and famine in many cultures. 

 

There was an article in Vanity Fair where a former war refugee was starving and he found a place where the shop owner had a lot of "sticks of meat." 

 

He tried it and he immediately recognized the taste and reported it to the police. The police was surprised that the refugee knew right away and found out that the refugee took part in the civl war in the country not too long ago and that he told the police he could recognize the meat as human bc it had a taste (like humans have some kind of unique taste in the way other animals do: pork, chicken, beef etc).

 

Ummm...if I had to guess..we are a species of monkey so...the taste he sensed out might be monkey meat??? 

 

I would like to try veal brains. Author James Peterson said it's cooked just like sweat bread and tastes the same but costs less and that it's just cultural prejudice that makes many people not want to buy or try it. But it has to be super fresh though. Never tried but maybe one day. 

@JoNorvelleWalker said long pork which is human.


Edited by demiglace forgot the @ it didn't help (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, eugenep said:

hey. i'm surprised no one said "human." 

 

@JoNorvelleWalker did as well ...

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why all the hate for people?  I was served brains once on an eastbound crossing.  Can't recall what species. Quite good, although I had some reservations with the thought.  A Dalmatian friend once said she could never stomach brains after seeing them splattered on a train station wall after a bombing in the war.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh. I guess humans were already mentioned. Lol. 

  • Haha 1

"Hmmm....what would Don Quixote do?" 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I gave up beef 11 years ago for religious reasons. I miss it occasionally, and this choice makes Argentina less attractive as a holiday destination.

I wouldn't like to eat monkeys.

I've tried tripe in Florence and andouilette in Paris. The first I couldn't swallow a second fork full. The second I couldn't quite make myself pull off the fork and into my mouth before spitting it out. Looks like a turd, smells like a turd, now I know what a turd tastes like. Are chitlins this bad?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Kerala said:

I gave up beef 11 years ago for religious reasons. I miss it occasionally, and this choice makes Argentina less attractive as a holiday destination.

I wouldn't like to eat monkeys.

I've tried tripe in Florence and andouilette in Paris. The first I couldn't swallow a second fork full. The second I couldn't quite make myself pull off the fork and into my mouth before spitting it out. Looks like a turd, smells like a turd, now I know what a turd tastes like. Are chitlins this bad?

I wish I could answer your question...I grew up in the Southern rural US and had a few occasions to enter places where chitlins were being boiled. My mom couldn't abide the smell of them so they weren't ever cooked at our house, nor did she ever encourage me to eat them.  I have no problem eating an intestine for what it is,  bit I can't get past the smell enough to want to try them. 

After having eaten squirrel brains as a child, and enjoying them at the time,  I have no desire to eat them as an adult.  

 

Edited to add; now after looking andouilette up,  and seeing what they are and how they are made, I feel assured I can add them to my list of things to not eat. Apparently the further down the intestinal tract you go, and the larger it is,  the more likely the colon has been used culminating in a stronger odor and flavor.


Edited by caroled (log)
  • Like 1

And this old porch is like a steaming greasy plate of enchiladas,With lots of cheese and onions and a guacamole salad ...This Old Porch...Lyle Lovett

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But natural sausage casing is innocuous .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/26/2019 at 7:12 PM, eugenep said:

hey. i'm surprised no one said "human." 

 

It's a dark thought but, as everyone knows, this did happen during war and famine in many cultures. 

 

There was an article in Vanity Fair where a former war refugee was starving and he found a place where the shop owner had a lot of "sticks of meat." 

 

He tried it and he immediately recognized the taste and reported it to the police. The police was surprised that the refugee knew right away and found out that the refugee took part in the civl war in the country not too long ago and that he told the police he could recognize the meat as human bc it had a taste (like humans have some kind of unique taste in the way other animals do: pork, chicken, beef etc).

 

Ummm...if I had to guess..we are a species of monkey so...the taste he sensed out might be monkey meat??? 

 

I would like to try veal brains. Author James Peterson said it's cooked just like sweat bread and tastes the same but costs less and that it's just cultural prejudice that makes many people not want to buy or try it. But it has to be super fresh though. Never tried but maybe one day. 

My mother used to cook brains every once in a while.    I never liked the consistency, which as a child I compared to scrambled eggs.     I have not encountered brains as an adult, but adore sweetbreads.    Perhaps support for my premise that there are no bad foods, only bad cooks.


eGullet member #80.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Kerala said:

I gave up beef 11 years ago for religious reasons. I miss it occasionally, and this choice makes Argentina less attractive as a holiday destination.

I wouldn't like to eat monkeys.

I've tried tripe in Florence and andouilette in Paris. The first I couldn't swallow a second fork full. The second I couldn't quite make myself pull off the fork and into my mouth before spitting it out. Looks like a turd, smells like a turd, now I know what a turd tastes like. Are chitlins this bad?

I totally agree about monkeys.   Tripe can be delightful, i.e., menudo, or various French preps.    Andouillette is, again, a favorite of mine.    Quality varies, as do cooks.    Again, my theory about no bad foods, only bad cooks.


eGullet member #80.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last week’s hot pot surprise ...

 

6BC975B5-9A5A-4445-B24A-380733DADB60.thumb.jpeg.2da9abdd4ef8a9de7107ee090ebaa859.jpeg

 

Only one way to describe it, once poached: Custardy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic really made me think 🤔. At first my answer was Offal. But then I remembered I have eaten Liver on a mixed grill in Majorca, just to try, and I love certain specific Patè. I would also do alot to be able to have my Nan's steak and kidney pudding again. So I can't say I would avoid offal. 

I am scared of Shellfish but last week I tried Scallops (loved em). And I adore Scampi (battered deepfried, pub style). 

I always say I'll never eat a Horse/Dog/Cat because of social norms, but I wouldn't have said I would eat crocodile before last week. 

I guess my answer depends on the day. Nothing is solid. Probably no bugs. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

My mother used to cook brains every once in a while.    I never liked the consistency, which as a child I compared to scrambled eggs.     I have not encountered brains as an adult, but adore sweetbreads.    Perhaps support for my premise that there are no bad foods, only bad cooks.

I agree -  I do wonder how veal brains might taste if it's cooked just like sweetbreads since the texture could be the same. 

 

I got to get brave enough to try next time I see them at shoprite (the ubiquitous grocery store in NJ)  


"Hmmm....what would Don Quixote do?" 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's hard to grasp how many ways that is impossible food. Sausage flavored sausage. Chicken processed to taste not like chicken. On purpose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well , at least they used ' edible salt '

  • Like 2
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...